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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  01:48:44  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello, all. Why Si, what a GREAT description of Cormyr’s intelligence operatives! I passed it on to Ed, who e-chortled.
Now, Ed makes reply to David Lázaro in the matter of festivities of Silverymoon. Heads up, all who love Silverymoon and are on the lookout for essential Silvaeren lore, because what follows definitely falls into that category! Ed begins by apologizing for the brevity of his replies, but we know what THAT means, don’t we?
Yes, I’ve had to split his reply into two, for fear of bumping into the post size limit. So here’s Part 1.
Ed speaks:



Hi, David. I’m afraid you’ve asked a question that is both way too big to answer properly AND runs into NDA troubles for me, but I’m going to sneak in a reply here that deals just with Midsummer, Shieldmeet, and the days leading up and immediately following them. I’m afraid (for NDA reasons) these entries are going to have to be very brief and “sketchy,” rather than properly detailed. In addition to these, many faiths hold various celebrations and rites (but only Moondown, listed hereafter, is observed city-wide). In the entries, “shops closed” never includes inns, taverns, festhalls, clubs, or dining-houses.

During the tenday preceding Midsummer, one festival is celebrated each day. Here are those ten, followed by Midsummer and Shieldmeet:

(snipping of much stuff)


So saith Ed. I’ve chopped his reply here, and accordingly will present Part Two on the morrow. Ed himself remains frantically busy with hush-hush Realms-related work, and can probably best be described as “happily exhausted.”
love to all,
THO



That ... was ... wonderful!!!!!!! My mask's off to you, Ed!

I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  01:55:00  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
“Mask’s off?”
Well, now . . .
(throaty purr): That’s MY job, Jamallo.
Ed just likes to watch.

love,
THO
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Gareth Yaztromo
Seeker

Australia
37 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  07:24:43  Show Profile  Visit Gareth Yaztromo's Homepage Send Gareth Yaztromo a Private Message
Ed will you ever write an autobiography? And also... are you going to watch Narnia this December? :)

Take care.

"Gereth Yaztromo is arguably the most famous wizard of Allansia due to his part in a number of the most well known sagas of that region from the third century AC. He is also known as one of the three Star Pupils of the Grand Wizard of Yore.."
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David Lázaro
Seeker

Spain
37 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  10:38:58  Show Profile  Visit David Lázaro's Homepage Send David Lázaro a Private Message
Wow! Incredible answer on Silverymoon festivities. Prismatically colourful. We're surely going to have lots of fun with those events. It also seems that the major Silvaeren festivities take place precisely before Shieldmeet, which makes sense for a city that's so far to the north.

I also hope that those NDA warnings that pop-up almost always that something about Silverymoon is asked means that there's more info coming. Who knows? Maybe an article in Dragon or another novel that's being written for the new cities series.

And as always, thanks for your hard work.
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David Lázaro
Seeker

Spain
37 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  19:05:11  Show Profile  Visit David Lázaro's Homepage Send David Lázaro a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One
Temples of Shar are closed during this day, and her worshippers by tradition pray only in private, not wearing any ceremonial garb, vestments, or symbols of that goddess.


I didn't notice this part on my first reading. Does it mean that there are open and public temples of Shar within Silverymoon gates? I'm a bit surprised.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  20:54:46  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Well spotted! No, worship of Shar in Silverymoon is done in cellars and behind the closed doors of private homes only. The notation was there because this is a Realms-wide rite of Selune, Ed tells me.
love,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  00:13:46  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, all. I present Part Two of Ed’s reply to David Lázaro about Shieldmeet-related festivities of Silverymoon. I ended Part One with the entry for Claws, and we rejoin Ed’s words with the festival held the next day, Glarth:



GLARTH: Colloquially known as “Fullbelly,” this is a day of widespread at-home feasting. Floral-decorated wagons are sent out from the Palace in the morning, piled high with smoked hams, loaves of bread, sausages, smoked fish, tiny drawstring-bags of spices, and fruit. The wagons head for the poorest streets of the city first, but circulate until emptied; anyone can reach down any food they want from the passing wagons (that they can personally carry, without benefit of a cart or wagon of their own) to augment whatever food they already have, so that none may know hunger on this day. Visitors to the city and those who live alone are invited to dine with families, or at inns and taverns with other loners, but no loud entertainment or organized revelry takes place (typically everyone eats too much and drowses in chairs and on beds and couches into the evening, talking lazily of divers matters).

OAMAURAE (“OH-more-ay”): After all the eating and drinking of the preceding day, few folk rise until after highsun on Oamaurae. Traditionally, this is a day when everyone goes out to a playhouse, acting-ground outside the walls, inn or tavern or private home where hired performances are being presented, or simply to a street performance, to see theater.
On Omaurae, new plays are presented for the first time, new ballads-with-dance-and-mime tales performed, and new drinks (fortified, doctored-with-herbs-and-spices wines and sherries) are sold to see what’ll catch on.
Returning home after enjoying performances, households take time during the evening to read aloud stirring passages of prose, or recite ballads and heroic tales from memory. Much rich dessert food is then consumed, and everyone goes to bed.

CLEARSIGHT: A half-day of work (shops open only until highsun). The rest of the day is devoted to planning ahead, on personal, household, and professional levels.
Everyone discusses politics and (if they’re involved in any) the wording of new agreements to be solemnized, or pacts to be renewed, on Shieldmeet. Business owners talk to their employees about the direction and aim of the business, commoners hoist tankards at taverns and discuss the latest news and the “way the world is sailing,” and everyone from adventurers to fashion-setting clothiers plots their planned doings in the seasons ahead. The shop closures make possible much “meeting with investors and merchants to plan future undertakings” (and to persuade would-be business partners by wining, dining, or even wenching them) - - if, of course, you can find the people you want to make contact with, among all the to-ing and fro-ing and gladhanding going on.

AMALREE’S PLEASURE: Amalree was a spectacular, affectionate, and much-loved dancer of Silverymoon, who died almost a century ago. In her honour, this day is devoted to lighthearted dancing and flirtation. Older folk (and those too injured or infirm to take part) gather to sip wine, watch the fun unfold around them, and play various elaborate board games. In recent years, wagering on these games has become very popular, and vast sums are won and lost by the evening of ‘the Pleasure.’

MIDSUMMER: The Feast of Love. No shops are open past highsun on this day. At highsun, small feasts (private meals) begin, and open public lovemaking begins. Many folk don’t take part, and stay home in their shuttered rooms, but the majority of citizens wander, watching or fondling or diving right in and participating in sex acts with those who beckon. Open doors are invitations to all, priests cast curative spells against diseases for free, orgies and public nudity and dalliance are commonplace, and even staid old Silvaeren tell off-colour jokes or make frank, lewd remarks or praisings they’d never dream of daring to utter on any other day (and to which those they are made to are supposed not to react, “forgetting” everything that happened on Midsummer after the next dawn). Traditionally, Alustriel makes love to all sorts of strangers of both genders and many races, and leads a “Hunt of Maidens” (which of course is nothing of the sort, but rather a hunt for a specific mask - - or rather, the person wearing it - - through various gardens) after the moon rises. Clergy of Loviatar and Ilmater give demonstrations involving lovemaking, and various wealthy folk with large homes host parties at which naughty games are held (eating various sweet desserts off the bared bodies of fellow revellers is a favourite tradition).

SHIELDMEET: Celebrated as it is everywhere in the Realms, this special day is devoted to open council between rulers and ruled, which really means: commoners can sit down and speak frankly with monarchs (who are typically protected against attack with ironguard, and various protective magics that mitigate the effects of missiles, particular sorts of spells, and so on) without being overheard by courtiers and without fear of reprisal. Commoners can communicate complaints, warnings, answer royal questions, pass on gossip, and so on; most rulers consider it the most valuable and informative day of their year, and often arrange to meet again soon with particular informants.
For rulers, guild members, merchants, masters and apprentices, and others engaged in renting or in transacting business, it’s a day of renewing agreements (often reviewed or drawn up earlier, during Clearsight).
It’s also a day of many contests, trials-of-arms, duels, contests-of-spells, and full-blown tournaments of horse-and-lance, with attendant wagering. These events are rarely undertaken in anger or to settle scores or legal disputes (though they can be, if Taern or Alustriel agree and the proceedings are overseen by Spellguard members), but serve as popular entertainment, with local merchants and wealthy notables sponsoring prizes for victorious contestants. Taking part in such trials has also become a very good way for adventurers and hedge-wizards seeking employment to attract the notice of potential patrons.
Silvaeren temples and visiting priests provide free healing magics and care to injured contestants, and the day ends with a “last revel” of theatrical performances and bardic and minstrel performances in various inns, taverns, clubs, and guild headquarters, at which mead and other sweetened wines are sipped and honey-cakes and other pastries and candies are consumed. (Because it’s “back to the everyday trudge and drudge on the morrow.”) Wise celebrants take to bed early and sober; foolish ones sing and carouse late into the night, and take surly hangovers to the shop the next day.


So saith Ed. Who hopes he’s been of some help, David, and apologizes again for the brevity of his reply. He also added this:

I’m pleased and honoured that you liked THE LONG ROAD HOME so much. I hope to have opportunities to tell many more such tales of the Realms in the years ahead. As for an autobiography: maybe. I’m really not that special a person. I have for years followed a personal philosophy of “try to forgive, try to understand, try to be kind - - and try to experience almost everything life offers, at least once,” but I can’t say that I’ve yet reached any deep philosophical insights by doing so, or made myself into a better person. However, I’m not going to stop trying.



And with that, Ed and I both bid you all adieu for another day. There are Realmslore promises in plenty to keep, and pages to pound out before Ed sleeps . . .
so love to all!
THO
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  02:56:14  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
Part three of Spin a Yarn 2004:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/spinayarn2004p3

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31688 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  03:04:52  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

Part three of Spin a Yarn 2004:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/spinayarn2004p3

Yes, I believe Wooly already provided an URL over in the 'Info on Volo' scroll in the General FR section.



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"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

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Edited by - The Sage on 12 Jul 2005 03:05:35
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  03:13:40  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

Part three of Spin a Yarn 2004:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/spinayarn2004p3

Yes, I believe Wooly already provided an URL over in the 'Info on Volo' scroll in the General FR section.






Didn't see it and the other two were in this thread.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  04:05:38  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Ed's original turnover version of the Spin A Yarn tale ran to 20,880 words or so, so there's probably more than one more part to come yet.
Which is great, because the tale is a hoot!
love,
THO
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31688 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  04:46:31  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Ed's original turnover version of the Spin A Yarn tale ran to 20,880 words or so, so there's probably more than one more part to come yet.
Which is great, because the tale is a hoot!
love,
THO

That's great! I'm enjoying this year's tale immensely.

Do I dare say that this one is shaping up to be better than last year's... ...

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 12 Jul 2005 :  09:30:19  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

The Shadowdale book in the 2e campaign box set has a small section on mills. :)



My humble thanks to thee, Kuje

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  00:07:03  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, fellow scribes.
Kuje, Ed hasn’t forgotten your Purple Lady queries, and will reply soon. In the meantime, however, he answers your divine spells question:


In 2nd Edition, 1st and 2nd level spells could be gained or renewed without direct connection to any deity (and so were obtainable during a Godswar, as I suggested in DRAGON #54, and we later all saw in the Time of Troubles). As a general rule, divine spells should be granted by deities (or their servant creatures) only as a result of direct prayer: in other words, yes, divine casters must worship a specific deity and not a cause or broad aspect.
However (weasel time), there will be exceptions, because in the endless game of one-up-god-ship that Faerűnian deities play, subtly struggling for supremacy over each other, dominance over intelligent races and events that affect their societies, and defense of personal portfolios, gods (and their loyal servant creatures) will often grant spells to mortals “out of the blue,” or under false pretenses, or whatever - - just to try to influence those events and achieve some unknown-to-mortals aim or temporary victory in the ongoing godly struggle. As I’ve said before, there are secrets about the gods I can’t yet reveal, but all of this boils down to: MOST divine casters get their spells by praying directly to a deity and serving that deity adequately (serve poorly, and your prayers may not be answered at all; serve superbly, and you may even receive extra magic), but A FEW divine casters may, for indefinite periods, receive spells when venerating only a cause, broad aspect, or even a dead or “the wrong” god.



So saith Ed. Exhibiting his usual love for compromise and all-inclusive attempts to please.
love to all,
THO
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  00:20:17  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello again, fellow scribes.
Kuje, Ed hasn’t forgotten your Purple Lady queries, and will reply soon. In the meantime, however, he answers your divine spells question:

So saith Ed. Exhibiting his usual love for compromise and all-inclusive attempts to please.
love to all,
THO


My thanks for both. I'm (im)patiently waiting for the Purple Lady answer because it's included in my tale that I'm working on for Candlekeep. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  00:20:18  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello again, fellow scribes.
Kuje, Ed hasn’t forgotten your Purple Lady queries, and will reply soon. In the meantime, however, he answers your divine spells question:


In 2nd Edition, 1st and 2nd level spells could be gained or renewed without direct connection to any deity (and so were obtainable during a Godswar, as I suggested in DRAGON #54, and we later all saw in the Time of Troubles). As a general rule, divine spells should be granted by deities (or their servant creatures) only as a result of direct prayer: in other words, yes, divine casters must worship a specific deity and not a cause or broad aspect.
However (weasel time), there will be exceptions, because in the endless game of one-up-god-ship that Faerűnian deities play, subtly struggling for supremacy over each other, dominance over intelligent races and events that affect their societies, and defense of personal portfolios, gods (and their loyal servant creatures) will often grant spells to mortals “out of the blue,” or under false pretenses, or whatever - - just to try to influence those events and achieve some unknown-to-mortals aim or temporary victory in the ongoing godly struggle. As I’ve said before, there are secrets about the gods I can’t yet reveal, but all of this boils down to: MOST divine casters get their spells by praying directly to a deity and serving that deity adequately (serve poorly, and your prayers may not be answered at all; serve superbly, and you may even receive extra magic), but A FEW divine casters may, for indefinite periods, receive spells when venerating only a cause, broad aspect, or even a dead or “the wrong” god.



So saith Ed. Exhibiting his usual love for compromise and all-inclusive attempts to please.
love to all,
THO



Which leads directly to a question which I had yesterday, but for which there was no entry point until now:

If a caster of "divine" spells comes from outside 3E Realmspace with a class or prestige class other than "cleric" which very specifically allows access to "divine" spells without prayer to a deity ("Favored Soul," for instance), are they ... ah ... stuff outta luck without a Torilian patron (as they were in 2E) unless one of the above-suggested flukes occurs?

What of spellcasters who rely on spirits for their spells but who come from outside Realmspace? Are there local spirits anxious to grant spells in order to add another worshipper/friend/whatever to their collection (not least because said mobile spellcaster can be a useful defender for them)? Or do the spirits of Toril arch their eyebrows at such types with an attitude of, "Why should we give spells to someone who would associate with Mount Watchmacallit on Planet Xyz?"

These fine distinctions may come perilously close to NDA terrain, but if they can be clarified, I am sure many would appreciate it.

I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  00:23:49  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message
So, I guess for those of us keeping score on the Eldreth Veluuthra divine help thread, Ed SEEMS to have said what many of us have guessed at, that if they are worshipping a "concept" it is likely some god granting them spells for one reason or another as part of a bigger plan.

Unless I am just hearing what I want to, lol.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
29906 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  02:20:51  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen


Which leads directly to a question which I had yesterday, but for which there was no entry point until now:

If a caster of "divine" spells comes from outside 3E Realmspace with a class or prestige class other than "cleric" which very specifically allows access to "divine" spells without prayer to a deity ("Favored Soul," for instance), are they ... ah ... stuff outta luck without a Torilian patron (as they were in 2E) unless one of the above-suggested flukes occurs?

What of spellcasters who rely on spirits for their spells but who come from outside Realmspace? Are there local spirits anxious to grant spells in order to add another worshipper/friend/whatever to their collection (not least because said mobile spellcaster can be a useful defender for them)? Or do the spirits of Toril arch their eyebrows at such types with an attitude of, "Why should we give spells to someone who would associate with Mount Watchmacallit on Planet Xyz?"

These fine distinctions may come perilously close to NDA terrain, but if they can be clarified, I am sure many would appreciate it.



It was 2E, but the Spelljammer setting had ways to do this.

Outside of your home sphere, you could only regain 1st and 2nd level spells.

In a sphere where your deity was worshipped, you were fine.

If your deity wasn't worshipped, you had a couple of options. You could hope that a local deity with a similar portfolio or alignment would grant your spells -- either out of a similarity to your deity, or an agreement with that deity. Failing that, there was a 2nd level spell called Contact Home Power that would allow you to "phone home" to renew your spells.

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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  02:26:27  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message
I think that even though they are "chosen" by their deity and have no formal training, a Favored Soul still need to pray to their god to receive spells. In fact, according to Complete Divine, even in "generic" D&D favored souls HAVE to have a deity as opposed to a concept, etc.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  04:25:30  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by KnightErrantJR

I think that even though they are "chosen" by their deity and have no formal training, a Favored Soul still need to pray to their god to receive spells. In fact, according to Complete Divine, even in "generic" D&D favored souls HAVE to have a deity as opposed to a concept, etc.

I am frightened that I had an easier time understanding your two sentence summary than I did the section in the book!

I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  12:39:33  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

If a caster of "divine" spells comes from outside 3E Realmspace with a class or prestige class other than "cleric" which very specifically allows access to "divine" spells without prayer to a deity ("Favored Soul," for instance), are they ... ah ... stuff outta luck without a Torilian patron (as they were in 2E) unless one of the above-suggested flukes occurs?



Perhaps one of the Toril's deities would actually grant this divine spellcaster his spells, while trying to subtly convert/manipulate this priest to worship him/her in the long run?

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  16:46:05  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
Guys,

Can we take the divine spell discussion to another thread. :) Thanks. And yes I realize I asked about it but if we are going to keep discussing it, this isn't the thread to do it in. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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Alaundo
Head Moderator
Admin

United Kingdom
5571 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2005 :  17:05:55  Show Profile  Visit Alaundo's Homepage  Click to see Alaundo's MSN Messenger address Send Alaundo a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

Guys,

Can we take the divine spell discussion to another thread. :) Thanks. And yes I realize I asked about it but if we are going to keep discussing it, this isn't the thread to do it in. :)



Well met

Indeed. As I mentioned earlier today in Elaine's scroll... could we please try to keep areas in the Chamber of Sages to questions only. If a response from an author\designer sparks of the need for in-depth discussion, please start a new thread elsewhere.

It just keeps things a little tider and helps the author locate new requests and questions too Thank ye.


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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2005 :  04:07:43  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello, fellow scribes. Ed of the Greenwood makes reply to two scribes in the matter of the daily disposal of the dead:



Borch and Asgetrion,
Things vary so much across the Realms that it’s difficult to give any valid overall answer to your questions. However, in general, burial matters in cities and large towns across Faerűn “work like this:”
Only noble or very wealthy or very old (long-established) families (or guilds) in an urban area have, and are allowed to keep, crypts within the city walls - - usually beneath the city proper. Everyone else must inter their dead (after allowing beasts to gnaw the bones clean, in some faiths, or after cremation in some faiths or in cases of disease, fungal growths, mummy rot, lycanthropy, suspected undeath, and so on) outside the city walls.
This is the case in Baldur’s Gate. Or to put it more correctly: aside from a few old, well-hidden old-family crypts in that city, the dead are disposed of in two ways: shipped out to an offshore isle for burning (a formerly-popular custom, now used only for sailors or shipowners), or far more often corpses are carted well inland, to a monastic community. Homeless and penniless folk make the journey in a common “dead cart” known as “the Vulture Run,” and most citizens have a simple walk-with-the-cart funeral.
In the case of Baldur’s Gate, the graveyard is about five miles northeast of the city walls, and (again to try to bring something of a “general rule across the Realms” into this answer) is consecrated ground surrounded by the claimed and farmed fields of a monastery, in an attempt to guard against undeath (or at least armies of shuffling undead rising out of graves unnoticed, until they pose a deadly threat to isolated steads and wayfarers). The Gate’s graveyard is called “the Field of Rest,” and consists of a vast burial hill surmounted by a simple chapel, in the heart of the mixed monastic community of Darfleet (named for its long-ago founding monk), temple-farms dedicated to the veneration of Chauntea. The monks bury all dead, using spells and fire-sticks to fight any undead who rise, and eventually till sections of the burial fields with plows, sewing edible crops that are harvested only for their seeds (sold and sent widely across the Realms). Other Darfleet fields do yield food that’s sold directly to folk in Baldur’s Gate and elsewhere, via city carters and passing caravan-merchants.
So that’s why you’ll find no graveyards on the FR ADVENTURES maps: the dead are either taken well outside a city, or are interred in underground crypts (guild members under a guild headquarters, for example, or members of a noble family under their own family mansion). After the Threat from the Sea, the mounded corpses of attacking sea-creatures were piled up on damaging, sinking vessels, towed out to sea, and incinerated with spells - - so the dryland defenders, to avoid any insult to their families, were all taken to a height (to the north) overlooking Baldur’s Gate, there burned, and carts full of the wetted-down ashes were taken to Darfleet for “tilling in.”
Borch, your earlier and longstanding questions haven’t been forgotten, and I WILL get to them in the fullness of time.



So saith Ed. Who is wearied with the weight of Realmslore work at the moment, yet loves crafting it as much as ever, after more than thirty-seven years of imagineering. What a guy.
love to all,
THO
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khorne
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1071 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2005 :  19:21:07  Show Profile  Visit khorne's Homepage  Click to see khorne's MSN Messenger address Send khorne a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello, fellow scribes. Ed of the Greenwood makes reply to two scribes in the matter of the daily disposal of the dead:



Borch and Asgetrion,
Things vary so much across the Realms that it’s difficult to give any valid overall answer to your questions. However, in general, burial matters in cities and large towns across Faerűn “work like this:”
Only noble or very wealthy or very old (long-established) families (or guilds) in an urban area have, and are allowed to keep, crypts within the city walls - - usually beneath the city proper. Everyone else must inter their dead (after allowing beasts to gnaw the bones clean, in some faiths, or after cremation in some faiths or in cases of disease, fungal growths, mummy rot, lycanthropy, suspected undeath, and so on) outside the city walls.
This is the case in Baldur’s Gate. Or to put it more correctly: aside from a few old, well-hidden old-family crypts in that city, the dead are disposed of in two ways: shipped out to an offshore isle for burning (a formerly-popular custom, now used only for sailors or shipowners), or far more often corpses are carted well inland, to a monastic community. Homeless and penniless folk make the journey in a common “dead cart” known as “the Vulture Run,” and most citizens have a simple walk-with-the-cart funeral.
In the case of Baldur’s Gate, the graveyard is about five miles northeast of the city walls, and (again to try to bring something of a “general rule across the Realms” into this answer) is consecrated ground surrounded by the claimed and farmed fields of a monastery, in an attempt to guard against undeath (or at least armies of shuffling undead rising out of graves unnoticed, until they pose a deadly threat to isolated steads and wayfarers). The Gate’s graveyard is called “the Field of Rest,” and consists of a vast burial hill surmounted by a simple chapel, in the heart of the mixed monastic community of Darfleet (named for its long-ago founding monk), temple-farms dedicated to the veneration of Chauntea. The monks bury all dead, using spells and fire-sticks to fight any undead who rise, and eventually till sections of the burial fields with plows, sewing edible crops that are harvested only for their seeds (sold and sent widely across the Realms). Other Darfleet fields do yield food that’s sold directly to folk in Baldur’s Gate and elsewhere, via city carters and passing caravan-merchants.
So that’s why you’ll find no graveyards on the FR ADVENTURES maps: the dead are either taken well outside a city, or are interred in underground crypts (guild members under a guild headquarters, for example, or members of a noble family under their own family mansion). After the Threat from the Sea, the mounded corpses of attacking sea-creatures were piled up on damaging, sinking vessels, towed out to sea, and incinerated with spells - - so the dryland defenders, to avoid any insult to their families, were all taken to a height (to the north) overlooking Baldur’s Gate, there burned, and carts full of the wetted-down ashes were taken to Darfleet for “tilling in.”
Borch, your earlier and longstanding questions haven’t been forgotten, and I WILL get to them in the fullness of time.



So saith Ed. Who is wearied with the weight of Realmslore work at the moment, yet loves crafting it as much as ever, after more than thirty-seven years of imagineering. What a guy.
love to all,
THO


What about Waterdeeps city of the dead? Why do the dead there not rise up and swarm the city?

If I were a ranger, I would pick NDA for my favorite enemy
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