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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2005 :  23:09:57  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by khorne

What about Waterdeeps city of the dead? Why do the dead there not rise up and swarm the city?



Actually, not all of Waterdeep's dead sleep quietly. The City of the Dead is closed off at night, precisely because some of its residents are prone to wandering...

As I recall, both the Watch and local priests do what they can to keep the City's "locals" from getting out.

Plus, not all of Waterdeep's dead are actually *in* the City of the Dead. Some of the crypts there are portals to other dimensions, where the dead are interred.

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Ladejarl
Seeker

Norway
55 Posts

Posted - 14 Jul 2005 :  23:23:55  Show Profile  Visit Ladejarl's Homepage Send Ladejarl a Private Message
Well met Lady Hooded One,

Pray ask the Bearded One if he are free to share any lore on which faiths are represented among the druids of the Misty Forest. Allso the names of some the druids of importance in the forest would be much appreciated.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2005 :  03:45:59  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all. khorne, Wooly’s reply to you is well said. Ed can’t say more on this for NDA reasons, but I’ll spill a LITTLE of the beans by saying: Interested in the dead not sleeping in the City of the Dead? Then you MUST read CITY OF SPLENDORS, a novel by Elaine Cunningham and Ed Greenwood!

This time Ed tackles Jamallo Kreen’s queries: “Is there a Torilian deity who has diplomacy as a portfolio? Do the gods have any divinity who travels amongst them as neutral messenger and herald, as Hermes served the Olympians, Hades, and Poseidon?
Does much diplomacy occur among the sentient races on Toril? It seems to me that every little squabble and disagreement quickly turns to guerilla warfare, assassination, terrorism, or full-scale invasion. . . . I suppose that a lot of diplomacy occurs within the Lords' Alliance, but I rarely see overt evidence of it in the novels or sourcebooks. Does it take place via portal travel? Do diplomats otherwise travel with trade caravans or do they travel only with their own entourages?”
Ed replies:


No deity has diplomacy as a portfolio, because diplomacy is a large part of what all priesthoods do (if you’re trying to influence matters in Faerûn involving other intelligent beings, without using weapons, you’re practising diplomacy whether you call it that or not). In other words, no deity will be allowed by the others to “own” a portfolio of diplomacy, even if certain divine beings are very eloquent, persuasive, or successfully manipulative.
The gods aren’t monolithic, but rather a number of pantheons. Among the human deities worshipped most widely across the Realms (in other words, those not grouped in FAITHS & PANTHEONS under a “Pantheon” heading in the “Other Deities” section), Helm once did a lot of shuttling “amongst them as neutral messenger and herald” before the Time of Troubles, but his actions during that time of crisis earned him such dislike that he’s abandoned that role after being so often spurned, since. In most of the other pantheons, deities employed their servants (archons, et al) as emissaries more often than one of their number performed heraldic duties.
Your impression that “every little squabble and disagreement quickly turns to guerilla warfare, assassination, terrorism, or full-scale invasion” is a function of the D&D game and commercial fiction demands, I’m afraid: a LOT of diplomacy (successful and otherwise) goes on daily among and between settlements of sentient races on Toril. If it did not, no stable, widespread trade would occur. You just don’t get shown it all that much in game adventures, novels, or Realms sourcebooks (although there’s an upcoming [NDA] that may help in a small way to change that) - - certainly not as much as such publications address open armed conflict. Remember that all the tense argument and confrontation scenes in royal courts (as seen in the various Cormyr novels, among the elves on Evermeet in Rich Baker’s current Last Mythal series, and so on) ARE diplomacy, even if they often end disastrously. You’ll see a lot of informal, one-on-one diplomacy in CITY OF SPLENDORS. The Zhentarim and the Red Wizard enclaves make daily coin through the sort of diplomacy known as trade negotiations - - it’s just that printed Realmslore rarely focuses on that.
(As to why the Zhentarim are widely feared or disliked: it’s due to most peoples’ aversion to suffering violence at the hands of powerful wizards who are known to be allied with priests of Cyric [murder, lies, intrigue, deception, illusion] or Bane [strife, hatred, tyranny, fear] AND beholders - - and the Zhents have so often struck at anyone who disagreed with them that others now expect them to do so. “From whom one buys one’s pots and pans shouldn’t be a matter of cosmic significance, in my opinion, but the people of Faerûn make it so,” you post, but I’ve never seen that as true in any of my writings: folk mistrust the Zhents and the Red Wizards for their violent tendencies and out of mistrust of their magic, not for the goods they trade - - and in general DON’T refuse to trade with them, or buy goods from caravan wagons that have travelled under Zhent protection, so I see no attachment of “cosmic significance” occurring, on the part of most folk of Faerûn.)
In general, diplomacy across the Realms is done daily by the Heralds (as revealed in the 2nd Edition CODE OF THE HARPERS and in the upcoming [NDA]), but also by “factors” (trade agents) and by the envoys (diplomats) of kingdoms and city-states treating directly with each other. Such delegations always travel with scribes and bodyguards (and usually trained spies, too). In very dangerous wilderland areas, when overland travel is extended, they may travel as part of a large caravan for safety, yes, but up and down the Sword Coast or within the Dragonreach lands they generally travel as a large, well-armed band flying the banners of the realm they represent and “peace and parley” banners depicting open hands. Such groups can expect to be stopped and searched by local authorities, but not imprisoned, attacked, harrassed, or to suffer confiscations unless they’ve openly done violence or thefts or arson, or are suspected of being something other than envoys (transporting slaves or poisons is not ‘legitimate’ behaviour for any trade envoy, for example).
Within the Lords’ Alliance, a lot of key diplomacy does occur via portal travel, yes, generally involving Silverymoon (or certain secluded Everlund mansions) as “common meeting-grounds.” Alustriel is so widely beloved that grumblings about her dominating affairs in the North are generally seen as just that: grumblings emitted as bargaining ploys. She’s the key counterweight to the natural dominance of Waterdeep within the Alliance - - yet there are also the “quiet voices” heard by few outside the Alliance, notably Tolgar Anuvien of Goldenfields, whose ability to feed (or starve) many Alliance members carries great weight.
And yes, international diplomacy has grown since the “Crusade” against the Tuigan Horde, because it brought many rulers together in common cause for the first time. Some have “lapsed back into their old ways,” yes, but most are more aware of, and place more value in, knowing what’s going on farther and farther away from their own patrol-outposts or borders.
So the diplomacy happens constantly, Jamallo Kreen, and can easily dominate your campaign if you want it to; don’t be misled by the natural tendency of Realms fiction and game offerings to concentrate on open combat.



So saith Ed. Whom I can back up on this, as one of his longtime players: most “home” Realmsplay sessions, with Ed as DM, are intrigue (diplomacy) and not combat at all (on many nights, we never draw weapons). Ed’s Realms are a proverbial hotbed of intrigue.
love,
THO
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2005 :  05:21:01  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Cyric [murder, lies, intrigue, deception, illusion] or Bane [STRIFE, hatred, tyranny, fear]



Oh dear Ed not you to!

The writers and proof readers that worked on the FRC and Faithes and pantheons have much to answer for!

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2005 :  05:32:38  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all. khorne, Wooly’s reply to you is well said. Ed can’t say more on this for NDA reasons, but I’ll spill a LITTLE of the beans by saying: Interested in the dead not sleeping in the City of the Dead? Then you MUST read CITY OF SPLENDORS, a novel by Elaine Cunningham and Ed Greenwood!

This time Ed tackles Jamallo Kreen’s queries: “Is there a Torilian deity who has diplomacy as a portfolio? Do the gods have any divinity who travels amongst them as neutral messenger and herald, as Hermes served the Olympians, Hades, and Poseidon?
Does much diplomacy occur among the sentient races on Toril? It seems to me that every little squabble and disagreement quickly turns to guerilla warfare, assassination, terrorism, or full-scale invasion. . . . I suppose that a lot of diplomacy occurs within the Lords' Alliance, but I rarely see overt evidence of it in the novels or sourcebooks. Does it take place via portal travel? Do diplomats otherwise travel with trade caravans or do they travel only with their own entourages?”
Ed replies:

(at length and well)



Thank you very much! I have read Cormyr since I posted my question, and I have a better grasp of the sort of negotiations you mention. (I hadn't read The Parched Sea until last week, either, and what can I say now but ... "Gosh, those Zhents are naughty people!")

I was aware that Goldenfields wields subtle power, but it didn't occur to me until I read your answer that winning Goldenfields to their side in a negotiation might be a way for some smaller communities to leverage Waterdeep or Silverymoon.

I look forward to (NDA).


_

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Smyther
Learned Scribe

Canada
121 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  01:02:21  Show Profile  Visit Smyther's Homepage Send Smyther a Private Message
I've a question for Ed regarding Netheril. Specifically, their floating cities.
I'm under the understanding that the cities of Netheril were created from the lopped-off mountain tops inverted, created to float, and then had cities built on them.
Unfortunately, this leaves the questions of the chopped-off mountains. Where are they and how many people know about them? Was there a favored ranged of mountains used by the Netherese that might still remain today as the 'flat top range' or such? It's just that I find no mention in lore of flat topped mountains and I'd think that people would have noticed the occasional one and noted it. That said, I can't recall how many flying cities there were, so I don't know how prevalent these headless mountains would be.
Many thanks to Ed if he knows the answer.

So sayeth the Smyther, the Dark Bard of Amn.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  01:23:24  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, all. Ed replies to Si in the matter of Realms terms for a troubleshooter:



Si, in Faerûn such a person is usually called a “ready hand” (meaning someone who can deal with, or will try to deal with [with a fair amount of competence or success], a wide variety of problems and tasks without a lot of fuss). The closest real-world translation would probably be “jack-of-all-trades.”
Someone who’s skilled at several sorts of craftwork (such as a person who can function well as a carpenter, locksmith, blacksmith, woodcarver, and tool-maker and -maintainer) is usually referred to a “guildscrafter” (meaning they could probably qualify for membership in multiple goods, not that they’re necessarily a member of any guild at all).
Someone trained and assigned (by the local governing authority) to “deal with problems” in any area, particularly if this involves occasional violence or “taking the law into their own hands” is sometimes called a “watchsword” even if they don’t carry a sword at all (as distinct from “guard” or “sentinel;” the possible confusion between the three terms is why the term is only employed “sometimes” and isn’t more widely popular).



So saith Ed, tirelessly revealing Realmslore wherever he goes. (And yes, Si, he agrees that “adventurer” is a pretty good answer, too.)
love to all,
THO
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Foxhelm
Senior Scribe

Canada
592 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  02:10:39  Show Profile  Click to see Foxhelm's MSN Messenger address  Send Foxhelm a Yahoo! Message Send Foxhelm a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Smyther

I've a question for Ed regarding Netheril. Specifically, their floating cities.
I'm under the understanding that the cities of Netheril were created from the lopped-off mountain tops inverted, created to float, and then had cities built on them.
Unfortunately, this leaves the questions of the chopped-off mountains. Where are they and how many people know about them? Was there a favored ranged of mountains used by the Netherese that might still remain today as the 'flat top range' or such? It's just that I find no mention in lore of flat topped mountains and I'd think that people would have noticed the occasional one and noted it. That said, I can't recall how many flying cities there were, so I don't know how prevalent these headless mountains would be.
Many thanks to Ed if he knows the answer.



I believe it has been stated that during the Fall of High Netheril, the magic chaos warped some of the mountains in the area that the Cities were cut from. This repointed them... well, perhaps most of them.

Ed Greenwood! The Solution... and Cause of all the Realms Problems!
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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  02:20:37  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message
Perhaps some of them are buried beneath the High Ice.

--Eric

--
http://www.ericlboyd.com/dnd/
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tauster
Senior Scribe

Germany
399 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  09:44:16  Show Profile  Visit tauster's Homepage Send tauster a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Smyther

I've a question for Ed regarding Netheril. Specifically, their floating cities.
I'm under the understanding that the cities of Netheril were created from the lopped-off mountain tops inverted, created to float, and then had cities built on them.
Unfortunately, this leaves the questions of the chopped-off mountains. Where are they and how many people know about them? Was there a favored ranged of mountains used by the Netherese that might still remain today as the 'flat top range' or such? It's just that I find no mention in lore of flat topped mountains and I'd think that people would have noticed the occasional one and noted it. That said, I can't recall how many flying cities there were, so I don't know how prevalent these headless mountains would be.
Many thanks to Ed if he knows the answer.


i placed a small number of "flat-top-mountains" in the central area of the desertsmouth mountains. many of those mountains might have lakes on their flat top, which could in turn be utilized by the dwarves of tethyamar: just build a dungeon/mine/underground settlement under the lake, drill it from below and voilá: instant source of water power! dwarves are known for their advanced engeneering skills, so water-powered forges aren´t too much of a stretch, imo.

matching adventure-idea for such dungeons (i.e. "what i did in my game" ):

a clan of dwarves from tethyamar had centuries ago built such a "hydropower-forge" under a flat-topped mountain with two lakes. after their realm crumbled, orogs occupied the dungeon and when the zhents discovered the mine, they quickly dominated the clan with the help of a beholder. a zhentarim mage settled in (guarded by the beholder and the orogs) and used the outpost as a handy laboratory and workshop for constructing golems. when he needed more space, he ordered the orogs to clean out the junk of a few more rooms, which they obediently did: all wooden scrap was piled in a room which had an small tunnel to the upside for air-ventilation (so the smoke wouldn´t fill the living rooms) and set afire. ...just bad that a rather large number of crates was thrown on the pile, full of an weird black powder!
the resulting explosion caused the lake to break through, completely filling the dungeon. of course, the players were trying to find some old dwarven stuff just when the pile was ignited. happy running!
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Si
Seeker

United Kingdom
18 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  10:12:16  Show Profile  Visit Si's Homepage Send Si a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello again, all. Ed replies to Si in the matter of Realms terms for a troubleshooter:
<brevity snip>




Yet another answer and a smile from the lady, my mug runneth over.
Many thanks for the answers you posted on the Realms list about the Red Sashes & Skullport this week also-I'll post them here soon if Alaundo will indulge me, now if only the new Waterdeep material would hurry up and come out. I read the sample chapter of the novel on Elaine Cunningham's website and enjoyed it a lot, is it going to be set in one time period or is it going to flit around in time like Cormyr, or Evermeet?

'Only the little people suffer at the hands of Justice; The creatures of power slide out from under with a wink and a grin.'
Quellcrist Falconer
Things I Should Have Learnt by Now
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  16:24:14  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Si
Many thanks for the answers you posted on the Realms list about the Red Sashes & Skullport this week also-I'll post them here soon if Alaundo will indulge me, now if only the new Waterdeep material would hurry up and come out. I read the sample chapter of the novel on Elaine Cunningham's website and enjoyed it a lot, is it going to be set in one time period or is it going to flit around in time like Cormyr, or Evermeet?




I snagged it already for my file for this site as well, so it'll be in Monday's update. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

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Llah
Acolyte

Ukraine
6 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  16:47:11  Show Profile  Visit Llah's Homepage Send Llah a Private Message
Some time ago I've read accessory "Fall of Myth Drannor" and after that was "Elminster in Myth Drannor". These books impressed me a lot, so I want to write some fan-fiction collection of essays about the Fall. But when the first three stories were ready, I run into some problems. And these problems are in the following questions:
1. The main theme of collection is the story of Iolas Eyriendor, Arykerym of Ak'Velahr, whose name was mentioned in the "Fall of Myth Drannor". He was described, as traitor, but I'd think a lot about his deeds…and asked myself: "And what if this man only executed a command?". So I read this book again and thought: "Hmm, the Fall was very bad event for all…except Noble Houses. They regain Old Elven Court, closed it for all non-elves, unruly commanders (such as Captain Selorn and Major Olortynaal) were dead, and the N'Tel'Quess-members of Council also were killed. This is very interesting". And after two days, when I sat at the table with pencil and paper, I suddenly stop writing and thought: "And what, if the Houses decided to surrender Myth Drannor with all its N'Tel'Quess?" So the first question to Ed is - "Could Houses decide to do this, or not? Could they decide to destroy the whole city for the restoration of elven glory?"
2. Second question. During the Twilight's Falling Lady Steel and a lot of Harpers at Twilight died. But what role did they play in Myth Drannor? Was their death important or nor? And could the Houses decide to kill her for the best of all golden elves?
3. In the description of the battle, which was named Dawn at Erolith's Knoll, the name of Erolith was mentioned. Is there any information about this "noted sylvan elf scout and warrior."
4. Human-mage Nezras, who later was named, as Traitor? Played some role in the Fall. There is no information about him, except notes about his participations in battles and his wedding with elven wizardress Raejiisa Sicafei. There are two questions - Is there anything about his life? - and - Could the family Sicafei agree with this wedding for the future use of Nezras during the War?
5. During the Silvergate Battle? Elminster Aumar detonated the portal between Silverymoon and Myth Drannon from within. Here is the citation from the rulebook - "Elminster was lost among the planes for a time, due to his task of destroying the gate from within". Is any information about El's traveling between planes?
6. During The Third Court Crusade 2/3 of Captain Selorn's forces were leaved in the restored Elven Court. He was a good commander and had to understood, that with 1/3 of army he couldn't do nothing in Myth Drannor - only die. So the question is: What was more important for Selorn, as a Captain of Ak'Velahr and also the son of the House Selorn - the order of Houses, representatives which formed the Council of Elven Court, or his duty before Myth Drannor?
7. And the last question. The Bane Duel. The last hope of Myth Drannor…or no? Or may be the hope was dead long ago? The last question is: IF Captain Fflar defeated Aulmpiter and stay alive, could he save the City of Song, or not?
That's all. I'll be very grateful for answers.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  17:26:08  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
Llah, The Fall of Myth Drannor was written by Steven Schend. You might want to ask him these questions, as well. His thread is here.

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Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 16 Jul 2005 17:26:50
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Alaundo
Head Moderator
Admin

United Kingdom
5584 Posts

Posted - 16 Jul 2005 :  19:20:24  Show Profile  Visit Alaundo's Homepage  Click to see Alaundo's MSN Messenger address Send Alaundo a Private Message
Well met

Ahhhh another scroll found drifting around the Chamber of Sages. This one, from Grayequus:

quote:
Originally posted by Grayequus

Well met Lady Hooded, Ed and all,
At the risk of venturing too sweeping a question: What can Ed reveal about 'table magic', and the 'gult' and 'vedarren' items used to craft the networks of 'waiting spells' alluded to the the novel? Are there other such devices and methods besides Cormanthyn spellwebs? Is 'table magic' Halruaan <as the pieces seen in Silverfall were looted from a tower there> or older?

While I'm asking about elder magics, what can be disclosed about 'wraithwizards' and El's life-draining sorceress foe in 'Last Tempation of Elminster' 's unique form of undeath and the processes that raise a mage into such forms of unlife? Are such states still achievable by wizards of the current Realms or is lichdom their only chance of eternal existance <short of being Chosen> ?

While I'm thinking of LToE and Silverfall, am I right to think that Shar in general, and perhaps most evil dieties of Aber-Toril have a rather cruel, sadistic relationship with their worshippers? Between the nameless novice being told to show her faith by consecrating an alter to the Mistress of Loss in her own blood as the temple's owlbear feasted on her living body, and the more psychological torment of Meira, the homely old priestess of Shar in Silverfall <who as much as said 'no one has ever loved me for what I am'> and who Shar 'kindly' gave the gift of the ability to seem like a lovely woman to lure men to her bed, it seems as though Faerun's darker gods find the suffering of their servants and laity as appealing as that of their sacrificial offerings..in whichever sense. Is this just a perception? It seems they'd find it hard to win faithful even among the bitter and vengeful if all of them end up suffering like a pimp's 'stable' does at his hands in our real world. Less so in fact, given that their eternal reward is subsumption by thier tormenting diety.

Sory to ramble on so, but these questions rise to the top as I reread my favorite of Ed's wonderful works..so I thought I'd lay them before him and see what came of it. Pray pardon if I've strained any rules or ettiquette..its my first time seeking answers here.

Alaundo
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  03:13:40  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello, all. Ed makes swift reply to Smyther about those inverted floating Netherese mountaintops:



Smyther, very few of the floating cities of Netheril were severed mountaintops. I know of only four, out of almost two score floating cities and castles (some floating constructs were little more than a single fortress).
Mountaintops are rarely “solid” rock, but rather the exposed and weathered “pointy ends” of fissured and cracked rock that’s either volcanic (and therefore of different consistencies, from the former outer cone ash to the onetime magma shaft), folded layers of rock thrust up “on end,” or even different tectonic plates. They don’t “hang together,” and thus there’s no benefit to lopping off mountaintops except impressing the observer. Most of the mountains (edge of Anauroch, in Thar, and areas now under the High Ice) that were mined or quarried or sculpted by various Netherese were consumed down to a rocky plain or plateau, and so have “left no trace” to modern mappers and explorers.
Many Netherese archwizards experimented with melting stone and sculpting it (to form honeycombed-with-passages “bases” that they then built up into soaring-spired palaces somewhat as a modern master confectioner “builds” an ornate wedding-cake), and they usually found it easiest to quarry boulders (cottage-sized and smaller) and magically bind them to other boulders of the same size, slowly building the result into a platform of about the size they wanted (constructed lying atop bare rock plateaus on the ground, not in the air).
Most Netherese cities looked like a series of palaces set among terraced gardens, with a few “viewing rooms” or griffon-steed landing ports visible around the “lower curve” edges. The creative competition turned in the direction of changing gravity, “sky” hue, and other local physical conditions by means of layers upon layers of spells.



So saith Ed. Ever onward into Realmslore!
love to all,
THO

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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  04:32:09  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
This is mostly a, hey Ed, give us your thoughts type of question.

Are paladins of Faerun allowed to have slaves? :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

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Edited by - Kuje on 17 Jul 2005 08:14:58
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  06:59:27  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

This is mostly a, hey Ed, give us your thoughts type of question.

Are paladins allowed to have slaves? :)



Id imagine a Paladin whose deity was from the Mulhorndi panthon could

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

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"Its good to be the King!"

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Llah
Acolyte

Ukraine
6 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  07:04:41  Show Profile  Visit Llah's Homepage Send Llah a Private Message
Thank you, Wolly, I'll try.
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  07:08:38  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Dargoth

quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

This is mostly a, hey Ed, give us your thoughts type of question.

Are paladins allowed to have slaves? :)



Id imagine a Paladin whose deity was from the Mulhorndi panthon could



I was just pointed to that, and I'll concede that but the main arguement was about Faerun mostly. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
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Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  07:09:58  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message
In the interests of not derailing Eds thread Ive posted a longer answer in your thread in FR chat

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Smyther
Learned Scribe

Canada
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Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  21:28:08  Show Profile  Visit Smyther's Homepage Send Smyther a Private Message
Thanks for the information. You know, I probably should have realized the impracticality of having mountain tops for bases, considering I'm an avid hiker of mountains and such. I was under the impression that all Netherese cities were constructed as such, but I stand corrected. I like both tauster's and Eric Boyd's ideas about the mountains, though this somewhat conflicts with the wild magic theory. I'll just have to go with Ed's (considering he is the master) explanation of complete destruction of mountains to build the cities (though there may be a few half-mountains in the High Ice...)

So sayeth the Smyther, the Dark Bard of Amn.
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
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Posted - 17 Jul 2005 :  23:28:59  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
I asked this elsewhere, but several sages were curious to know Ed's answer. Many are particularly interested in what the Waterdhavian chapbook printers have added. (I postulated that there is some Waterdhavian Aldus printing authoritative scholarly editions even as we write, but who knows of that besides you, Ed?)

quote:
I have seen a few lists of books held in various libraries in Faerûn, including books written as recently as 1370 DR, and I have even written out some of the quotes from plays and books which have appeared as epigraphs in Ed's writings, but what are "the Classics" of Torilian literature -- the books with which every educated person is expected to be familiar? What are Toril's answers to the Iliad, Tao te ching, Euclid's Elements, Aristotle's Poetics, their 1000 Nights and a Night, Canterbury Tales and Paradise Lost, Epic of Gilgamesh, and so on? Since the Mazticans still have much of their literature intact, what are their "great books"? What's Kara-Tur's "five foot shelf"?




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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

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Posted - 18 Jul 2005 :  01:53:53  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Kuje, your Purple Lady lore arrives at last!

First, to Si: yes, please repost Ed’s Red Sashes and Waterdeep replies in this thread. Ed informs me that the already-posted Prologue of CITY OF SPLENDORS is set back at the time of the Threat From The Sea, but the rest of the book is current Realms time, jumping from group of characters to group of characters, but never “back and forth” in time.

Second, Ed deals with Kuje’s paladins keeping slaves query:


In theory, a paladin born, raised, and temple-trained in a slave-keeping culture (like the Mulhorandi example already mentioned) could keep slaves if the paladin’s deity saw nothing wrong in that (if they did, the dream-vision commandments to “do something” about it would be pretty firm). Otherwise, no. The more familiar Faerûnian cultures already presented in print don’t equate slavekeeping with enough “this is the just and right way of doing things” for a paladin to stomach it. If a paladin ventures into slave-keeping lands and cities, the individual character of the paladin and the views of his or her deity, divine servitors, and priests the paladin has contact with will determine how the paladin reacts to other individuals keeping slaves. In the already-published CITY OF SPLENDORS prologue, Elaine and I show you a paladin of Waterdeep’s reaction to indenture-bondage (slavery by any other name) practised in Luskan.



So saith Ed. Who then passes on gleefully to speak at far more length with your desired festhall details:



Ah, the Purple Lady . . .
Picture a steep-slate-shingled, many-gabled four-storey wooden, whitewashed house whose upper two floors cantilever out (not only with ornate balconies, side-screened and solid-roofed against pigeons, where aromatic flowers are grown and intimate laundry is hung to dry, but also with floors that are larger than the floors below, the fourth jutting even more than the third) over the street. It descends for two cellars below street level, the lowest being damp and moldly and used for storage of things intended to be forgotten, and the “close cellar” (uppermost) being entered from the house above and from the street (via a locked-metal doors-covered delivery ramp) and used for storage: firewood storage, beer in casks, potatoes, turnips, and apples in bins, old furniture, and, yes, a “dungeon” for holding drunkards, unruly guests, and those who like to give and receive pain or stage “mock sacrifices on altars” as part of their sex play.
Above the cellar is the ground floor, having two open-only-from-inside, double-barred alley doors, and one public entrance: a double-width, massive door with an ornate brass-barrel handle like a steward’s rod of office. It bears a faintly-glowing (magic paint) image of a cowl-cloaked (in purple, of course) lady, seen side-on, facing to the right (the shape of the figure bespeaks the femininity).
Inside the door is a thick-carpeted forehall, apparently walled in tapestries. At least four armed bodyguards stand ready behind them at all times, ready to be summoned by the visible hostess and doorlar (doorman). Firequench magics govern this room: NOTHING will burn or ignite. Light comes down through three circular glass ‘portholes’ in the ceiling, from lamps in a room above.
To the visitor’s left, the tapestries will part to reveal a magnificent stair ascending to “the Rest.” The hostess awaits a visitor’s request; those desiring sex with one of the twelve ladies of the house know to ask for “purple for coin.” Some guests really just want a room for the night, either to sleep or for shady business or party revelry of their own, and require nothing more than the discretion of the house (soundproofing is magically augmented, and very good).
The topmost or fourth floor (which has nothing above it but a few rooftop rainwater-cisterns for gathering wash-water) is where the staff sleep; the floor below it has six to eight bedchambers that can be rented out to guests who desire nothing more than a place to sleep (though the Lady entirely lacks stabling facilities), as well as three “pleasure chambers” (lushly-furnished bedchambers for sex fun), the floor beneath that is given over to ten pleasure chambers, and the lowest of the upper floors has two private meeting-rooms (one with a kitchen antechamber connected to the main kitchens below via a dumbwaiter), an office, a bathing-chamber with a large, deep multi-person “sit in” bath, and a suite of three joined bedchambers with their own garderobes and robing-rooms, that can be rented for private parties. These floors are linked by the main stair (curving from landing to landing; there’s a guard sitting on a chair at each landing, with alarm-gongs) and by a back stair; the latter goes down via the kitchen pantries into the cellars.
The ground floor of the Purple Lady is devoted to the kitchen and its pantries, along the back, and (through the tapestries on a visitor’s right, from the forehall) a dimly-lit dining-hall (we moderns would call it a restaurant), called The Lady’s Pleasure.



So saith Ed. I know you’ll snarl at this, Kuje, but I’ve split up Ed’s reply to avoid running into the post-size-limit. I’ll send along the second part tomorrow (because, she breathed, tortured anticipation is good for any man).
love,
THO
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
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Posted - 18 Jul 2005 :  02:06:40  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
My thanks Ed, for the slavery issue and the Purple Lady. Bah on the 2 parts though! But more lore for me! :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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