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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 08 Feb 2007 :  22:25:20  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

Well, we pretty much are a single pool of designers these days -- no one is specifically dedicated to FR, or Eberron, or Core D&D. We try to take lessons from all of our lines and spread 'em around. For example, the new FR adventures coming out this year make use of the adventure format of "Expedition to Castle Ravenloft."



And I, for one, truly appreciate that we are going to get so many great FR adventures and tomes this year!

Anything you can reveal about the first (Cormyr) adventure? I know it takes place in the Vast Swamp, and hopefully there will be links to Minauros (which is the source of the 'evil nature' of the swamp) and the kingdom of Orva (apparently mentioned in 'Four from Cormyr').

There are also references to old elven ruins in the center of the swamp ("as vast as Myth Drannor") and I was hoping that they will also be featured in the module in some way...


"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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latharast
Acolyte

Poland
4 Posts

Posted - 16 Feb 2007 :  18:21:20  Show Profile  Visit latharast's Homepage Send latharast a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Greetings Mr. Baker

My question (which is in fact a big request):
-can you tell me anything more about war-mythals, beside that, what you had written in TLM trilogy?

PS. Good luck with you're new trilogy :)
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 24 Feb 2007 :  12:25:27  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

I created the Pale Sybil for the story; she isn't mentioned anywhere else. However, a couple of the key components behind the Sybil appear in the FR sourcebook "Underdark," which I worked on extensively. For example, the abyss known as Lorosfyr is a place I created for that book. Bruce Cordell invented the Deep Imaskari, and I riffed on that by positing that a Deep Imaskari "sister city" might have been the cause of the mysterious ruins and terrible stairs found in the abyss.

When working on that part of Final Gate, I decided to put on my "A. Merritt" hat. Merritt wrote a number of stories about people going into fantastic hidden lands and worlds and confronting horrendous, inhuman evil; for example, "The Moon Pool," "The Metal Monster," "Dwellers in the Mirage," or "The People of the Pit." I like to pay homage to the Golden Age masters when I can. Lorosfyr and the Pale Sybil didn't fall far from the tree.



What I really loved about the book was the atmosphere... and the fact that this book felt like it was written as an adventure (I think you could easily adapt it into a "super-sized" adventure :) and all the main characters felt like MY characters in a campaign.

The part in Lorosfyr was especially superbly written, and it felt like Araevin and co. were sticking their noses into a place that held something primordial/ancient, horribly patient and evil... I almost had goose-bumps many times as I poured through the pages. Lorosfyr really felt like a mythical, terrible place, and you did a GREAT job in portraying the place as such.
If I had played Araevin, I would have been scared out of my wits and instantly teleported out of there! :D

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2007 :  19:53:31  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well met, Goodsir! I recently made a ruling in my campaign that wizards who use the Shadow Weave cannot learn spells from the spellbooks of Weave users, and vice versa. The question particularly concerned someone who started as a Weave user and then turned to the Shadow Weave.

Ed having declared you the ultimate authority on Shadow Weavery, Mr. Baker, I ask your opinion: can Weave and Shadow Weave users learn spells from the other's spellbooks? I know it's my campaign and all that, but I have promised my players that I will always seek out the opinions of the authors and designers when I have a doubt about something. Your answer, therefore, will be taken strongly into consideration.

I thank you for all of your wonderful contributtions to the game, and to the Realms in particular.


I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 02 Mar 2007 :  23:04:04  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, Jamallo, nice to meet you --

Well, I hate to say it, but I think I would go the other way. To my mind casting a spell consists of two steps: 1) gather the energy, and 2) say the words and perform the actions that make it happen. I believe that step 2 is largely independent of the exact method used to gather the energy for the spell. However, there's no reason you can't go the other way in your campaign. It reduces the value of "enemy" spellbooks the PCs capture, but other than that it shouldn't make much difference in the game.


quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

Well met, Goodsir! I recently made a ruling in my campaign that wizards who use the Shadow Weave cannot learn spells from the spellbooks of Weave users, and vice versa. The question particularly concerned someone who started as a Weave user and then turned to the Shadow Weave.

Ed having declared you the ultimate authority on Shadow Weavery, Mr. Baker, I ask your opinion: can Weave and Shadow Weave users learn spells from the other's spellbooks? I know it's my campaign and all that, but I have promised my players that I will always seek out the opinions of the authors and designers when I have a doubt about something. Your answer, therefore, will be taken strongly into consideration.

I thank you for all of your wonderful contributtions to the game, and to the Realms in particular.




Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 07 Mar 2007 :  19:12:25  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

Hi, Jamallo, nice to meet you --

Well, I hate to say it, but I think I would go the other way. To my mind casting a spell consists of two steps: 1) gather the energy, and 2) say the words and perform the actions that make it happen. I believe that step 2 is largely independent of the exact method used to gather the energy for the spell. However, there's no reason you can't go the other way in your campaign. It reduces the value of "enemy" spellbooks the PCs capture, but other than that it shouldn't make much difference in the game.


quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

Well met, Goodsir! I recently made a ruling in my campaign that wizards who use the Shadow Weave cannot learn spells from the spellbooks of Weave users, and vice versa. The question particularly concerned someone who started as a Weave user and then turned to the Shadow Weave.

Ed having declared you the ultimate authority on Shadow Weavery, Mr. Baker, I ask your opinion: can Weave and Shadow Weave users learn spells from the other's spellbooks? I know it's my campaign and all that, but I have promised my players that I will always seek out the opinions of the authors and designers when I have a doubt about something. Your answer, therefore, will be taken strongly into consideration.

I thank you for all of your wonderful contributtions to the game, and to the Realms in particular.







Well, thank you! I may go part way and rule that 0 and 1st level spells would be learnable by the renegade, but that anything above the level she could cast when she "made the switch" would be blocked from her mind by Mystra. It is (I hope) a happy compromise. In my campaign there is, indeed, a serious question of who is accessing whose spellbooks, so I think this compromise may help to nip that in the bud -- after a certain point there would be no advantage to sneeking a peek at another party member's spellbook.

I shall proceed to my Yahoo group and spread the (revised) word.

Also, shall I take your comments to indicate that arcane spellcasters who do not prepare spells (bards, sorcerers, etc.) can learn to cast a spell from observing either its Weave or Shadow Weave counterpart? Their mojo is inherently different from wizardry, so I would be inclined to put fewer limitations on their ability to learn from either Weave or Shadow Weave users. Do you concur?





I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Delzounblood
Senior Scribe

United Kingdom
578 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2007 :  10:14:41  Show Profile Send Delzounblood a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Richard,

I just wanted to say I have just read The Shadow Stone, What an Excellent Book!

Now this is one of those books that lends itself to a sequel.

So is it part of a trilogy or series? and if so What are the other titles?

Again a really good book!

interesting use of wood for spell storage.

Delz

I'm Back!
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 08 Mar 2007 :  21:03:43  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delzounblood

Richard,

I just wanted to say I have just read The Shadow Stone, What an Excellent Book!

Now this is one of those books that lends itself to a sequel.

So is it part of a trilogy or series? and if so What are the other titles?

Again a really good book!

interesting use of wood for spell storage.

Delz



Lest you think that I am only interested in you because Ed said you were the man on Shadow Weave matters, permit me to echo all of the above.

I'd like to learn a lot more about pre-modern Shadow Weave magic and Shadow Mages (ones who use Weave magic to manipulate shadows). Ebenfar and the Shadowking were rooted in Weave magic, weren't they?



I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.


Edited by - Jamallo Kreen on 08 Mar 2007 21:05:47
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 19 Mar 2007 :  03:31:09  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Any chance you can tell us what levels characters need to be do go through Expedition to Undermountain?

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 20 Mar 2007 :  20:57:26  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well met, Mr. Baker!

I have some questions about the article on the Far Side ... er ... Far Realm, which Bruce R. Cordell wrote about for Dragon 330 (April 2005). However, since I haven't yet figured out how to quickly post a message to him on his web site, I refer them to you, as lead author for Lords of Madness. Given the possibly broad application of the answers, you are certainly just as qualified to voice your learned opinion as are the other sages to whom we defer.

The first question, a two-parter, is this: First, "if there is a level of the Intelligence or Wisdom abilities so high as to render a living (or undead) being mentally immune to the mind-shattering effects of poking about in the Far Realm or having its inhabitants poke about in one's body and mind, what would you consider that level to be?"

There is a Realms angle to this. The big problem with the spell Karsus's Avatar was that Karsus himself didn't have the mental capacity to grok Mystryl's knowledge and he cracked under the pressure, necessitating her sacrifice. This suggests that a deity's knowledge and understanding are vastly superior to that of even top-notch Archwizards/Netherese Arcanists. However, repeated examples show that some humans can cope with deific amounts of knowledge (and not just Chosen or proxies). Presumably, anyone who had the mental chops to deal with god-level knowledge could survive the shock of realizing its immensities. (Pace, Vaarsuvius!) Bane can clearly handle it, and Cyric obviously can't. Both were once mortals, and Cyric went insane, whereas Bane merely developed a bad attitude. (Oh, to see Bane's childhood report card comments! -- "The boy doesn't play well with others. Instead of asking teachers proper questions, he shouts at them them to, 'Tremble and obey!' He runs while carrying scissors. He will doubtless come to a bad end")

Ahem. Please pardon the digression. I return to my sheep: question the first, part the second: "if most mortals cannot handle god-knowledge, but some can, may we safely infer that some deities can handle Far Realm experiences and some can't? Would that be a reflection of their Intelligence, Wisdom, Divine Rank, class levels, or portfolios and domains?"

The second question is, I trust, simpler: "are aberrations, and those who have monstrous feats which muddle their minds with an alien mind-set when they are probed by other beings, immune to the mind-shattering effects of the Far Realm?" Its corollary: "if some monstrous beings are immune to the insanity caused by the Far Realm, which are they?"

The second question has implications for all D&D campaigns which incorporate intrusions from the Far Realm, but for those following the Age of Worms adventure path, my questions are particularly relevant to the show-down with Kyuss. He is immune to mind-effecting magics (as are many deities), and he is an aberration himself. The thrust of my questions is this: "Is the Far Realm so unspeakably awful that it supersedes normal D&D rules, affecting those who are 'normally' immune to mind-affecting magic or effects, and are Cerebrotic spells so horrendously abnormal that they can effect those who would 'normally' be immune to all magic less than Epic? Might an Alienist with Cerebrotic spells, for example, prevail against mighty beings who would be otherwise immune to the magic of 'normal' space-time?"

If Cthulhu calls, are 'normal' gods unafraid to pick up the white courtesy telephone and take his call? Are his most powerful minions (or those of other eldritch, capital-"E" Evils) able to scorn the gods themselves because of the magic of madness which they wield?

I have noticed that Toril's EEEs (Elder Elemental Evils) and some deities from other pantheons are so abominable that it requires many deities (and sometimes whole pantheons) to subdue or imprison them, and trickery must often be used to trap them. Such entities include the Dragonking (Marco Volo's buddy), Kezef the Chaos Hound, the Fenris Wolf, Ksarul (from Tekumel/Empire of the Petal Throne), the historical Tiamat of Earth, and the historical Sekhmet of Earth (whose subdual turned out to be relatively simple, although only one god could figure it out: She had to be plied with blood-colored beer -- something those folk who were recently partying on Saint Paddy's Day might want to think about: if Sekhmet needed blood-colored beer to get Her stupefied, what abominable, soul-rending horror might need to be subdued with green beer?!).

I realize that much of this ultimately devolves upon individual DMs, but I'd like Faerun's premier Lord of Madness to weigh in on this. Having read Monte Cook's When the Sky Falls, I have already ruled that the plasma "element" can harm gods (it is presumably "thaumaturgic meteorites," loaded with raw plasma energy, which they chuck at each other during their God Wars), and I am using the 3E Unearthed Arcana sanity rules, so ruling that the Far Realm and its nightmarish entities and their magics can effect aberrations and even gods is not a stretch for my campaign, but I don't want to go completely off the deep end and veer too far from the standard rules, so I'm very interested in reading whether or not you think that the Far Realm is so far out that it and its denizens can alter the norms of a game, especially one set in a world as well thought-out as Toril.

Elsewhere I have asked people what they consider to be "Forbidden Lore" -- the stuff so bad that even gods of knowledge such as Oghma and Oerth's Delleb forbid access to it or possibly destroy it and all records of it. Given the heavy-duty magic which Oghma permitted Cyric to read in Prince of Lies (a spell personally written by Gargauth!), real "Forbidden Lore" must be so extreme that it blows even the minds of greater gods (or reveals their deepest weaknesses). We know that this lore is "out there," so do you, Mr. Baker, think that the Far Realm and that which is associated with it would/should fall under the "Forbidden Lore" heading because it is baleful to the gods themselves? Or are they made of sterner stuff? If the latter, which quality or qualities permit them to stand against the Far Realm?

Please forgive the great length of this post, but it's difficult to express oneself succinctly when writing about matters which can melt the brain of a 41st level Netherese Mentalist with a 22 Intelligence and a 19 Wisdom!



I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 22 Mar 2007 :  21:10:41  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sorry for the slow response, I've been super-busy lately. I'm glad you liked the book!

The Shadow Stone is a stand-alone book, although the Shadow Weave concept obviously was picked up for 3rd Edition. I suggested a sequel to our Book Department (basically "Aeron Goes to Thay") but nothing ever came of it.


quote:
Originally posted by Delzounblood

Richard,

I just wanted to say I have just read The Shadow Stone, What an Excellent Book!

Now this is one of those books that lends itself to a sequel.

So is it part of a trilogy or series? and if so What are the other titles?

Again a really good book!

interesting use of wood for spell storage.

Delz


Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 22 Mar 2007 :  21:12:47  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Again, my apologies for the slow response.

You should start with 1st level characters. I believe the adventure will take you up to about 9th level by the time you finish.


quote:
Originally posted by Dargoth

Any chance you can tell us what levels characters need to be do go through Expedition to Undermountain?


Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 22 Mar 2007 :  21:22:21  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, RAW (rules as written) simply say that you make a DC 20 Will save when you enter the Far Realm, and another save each hour you remain. So if your Will save bonus is +19, presumably you're pretty safe. You can still fail on a roll of 1. However, deities of divine rank 1 or higher no longer auto-fail on 1. So any deity with a Will save of +19 or better is effectively immune to Far Realms madness, but any mortal creature not native to the Far Realm is still at some small risk no matter how good their Will saves are.

It might be reasonable to "house rule" that aberrations count as natives of the Far Realm and therefore aren't subject to the plane's madness, but nothing in the rules supports that. It seems like a okay use of Rule Zero to me, though.

* Snipped quote *

quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

Well met, Mr. Baker!


The first question, a two-parter, is this: First, "if there is a level of the Intelligence or Wisdom abilities so high as to render a living (or undead) being mentally immune to the mind-shattering effects of poking about in the Far Realm or having its inhabitants poke about in one's body and mind, what would you consider that level to be?"


The second question is, I trust, simpler: "are aberrations, and those who have monstrous feats which muddle their minds with an alien mind-set when they are probed by other beings, immune to the mind-shattering effects of the Far Realm?" Its corollary: "if some monstrous beings are immune to the insanity caused by the Far Realm, which are they?"

The second question has implications for all D&D campaigns which incorporate intrusions from the Far Realm, but for those following the Age of Worms adventure path, my questions are particularly relevant to the show-down with Kyuss. He is immune to mind-effecting magics (as are many deities), and he is an aberration himself. The thrust of my questions is this: "Is the Far Realm so unspeakably awful that it supersedes normal D&D rules, affecting those who are 'normally' immune to mind-affecting magic or effects, and are Cerebrotic spells so horrendously abnormal that they can effect those who would 'normally' be immune to all magic less than Epic? Might an Alienist with Cerebrotic spells, for example, prevail against mighty beings who would be otherwise immune to the magic of 'normal' space-time?"

If Cthulhu calls, are 'normal' gods unafraid to pick up the white courtesy telephone and take his call? Are his most powerful minions (or those of other eldritch, capital-"E" Evils) able to scorn the gods themselves because of the magic of madness which they wield?

I have noticed that Toril's EEEs (Elder Elemental Evils) and some deities from other pantheons are so abominable that it requires many deities (and sometimes whole pantheons) to subdue or imprison them, and trickery must often be used to trap them. Such entities include the Dragonking (Marco Volo's buddy), Kezef the Chaos Hound, the Fenris Wolf, Ksarul (from Tekumel/Empire of the Petal Throne), the historical Tiamat of Earth, and the historical Sekhmet of Earth (whose subdual turned out to be relatively simple, although only one god could figure it out: She had to be plied with blood-colored beer -- something those folk who were recently partying on Saint Paddy's Day might want to think about: if Sekhmet needed blood-colored beer to get Her stupefied, what abominable, soul-rending horror might need to be subdued with green beer?!).

I realize that much of this ultimately devolves upon individual DMs, but I'd like Faerun's premier Lord of Madness to weigh in on this. Having read Monte Cook's When the Sky Falls, I have already ruled that the plasma "element" can harm gods (it is presumably "thaumaturgic meteorites," loaded with raw plasma energy, which they chuck at each other during their God Wars), and I am using the 3E Unearthed Arcana sanity rules, so ruling that the Far Realm and its nightmarish entities and their magics can effect aberrations and even gods is not a stretch for my campaign, but I don't want to go completely off the deep end and veer too far from the standard rules, so I'm very interested in reading whether or not you think that the Far Realm is so far out that it and its denizens can alter the norms of a game, especially one set in a world as well thought-out as Toril.

Elsewhere I have asked people what they consider to be "Forbidden Lore" -- the stuff so bad that even gods of knowledge such as Oghma and Oerth's Delleb forbid access to it or possibly destroy it and all records of it. Given the heavy-duty magic which Oghma permitted Cyric to read in Prince of Lies (a spell personally written by Gargauth!), real "Forbidden Lore" must be so extreme that it blows even the minds of greater gods (or reveals their deepest weaknesses). We know that this lore is "out there," so do you, Mr. Baker, think that the Far Realm and that which is associated with it would/should fall under the "Forbidden Lore" heading because it is baleful to the gods themselves? Or are they made of sterner stuff? If the latter, which quality or qualities permit them to stand against the Far Realm?

Please forgive the great length of this post, but it's difficult to express oneself succinctly when writing about matters which can melt the brain of a 41st level Netherese Mentalist with a 22 Intelligence and a 19 Wisdom!





Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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Delzounblood
Senior Scribe

United Kingdom
578 Posts

Posted - 23 Mar 2007 :  10:30:04  Show Profile Send Delzounblood a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

Sorry for the slow response, I've been super-busy lately. I'm glad you liked the book!

The Shadow Stone is a stand-alone book, although the Shadow Weave concept obviously was picked up for 3rd Edition. I suggested a sequel to our Book Department (basically "Aeron Goes to Thay") but nothing ever came of it.


quote:
Originally posted by Delzounblood

Richard,

I just wanted to say I have just read The Shadow Stone, What an Excellent Book!

Now this is one of those books that lends itself to a sequel.

So is it part of a trilogy or series? and if so What are the other titles?

Again a really good book!

interesting use of wood for spell storage.

Delz






Arrrgh!!!!

A stand alone!


*incohearant gibberings*


Please could you, would you try Wotc again!

Delz

I'm Back!
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 24 Mar 2007 :  18:31:15  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

Well, RAW (rules as written) simply say that you make a DC 20 Will save when you enter the Far Realm, and another save each hour you remain. So if your Will save bonus is +19, presumably you're pretty safe. You can still fail on a roll of 1. However, deities of divine rank 1 or higher no longer auto-fail on 1. So any deity with a Will save of +19 or better is effectively immune to Far Realms madness, but any mortal creature not native to the Far Realm is still at some small risk no matter how good their Will saves are.

It might be reasonable to "house rule" that aberrations count as natives of the Far Realm and therefore aren't subject to the plane's madness, but nothing in the rules supports that. It seems like a okay use of Rule Zero to me, though.

* Snipped quote *

quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

Well met, Mr. Baker!


(snip)

Please forgive the great length of this post, but it's difficult to express oneself succinctly when writing about matters which can melt the brain of a 41st level Netherese Mentalist with a 22 Intelligence and a 19 Wisdom!







That's why you write the rules and I just buy them. A few minutes of thoughtful study would have revealed those (obvious to everyone but me!) answers and saved you me the trouble of writing that post and you the trouble of reading it.

I am enlightened. Thank you. I will now go ask my dog about his Buddha nature....



I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 30 Mar 2007 :  18:40:59  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My enlightenment now lapses.

I got Dungeons & Dragons for Dummies yesterday (hey! -- it was well-reviewed in Dragon!) and ran across the following sentence on pp 344-345 which left me totally confused: {Re:sleep} "In fact, many players with sorcerer characters use their 4th-level spell swap to chuck sleep and learn something else." I don't understand that at all. I can't find a reference anywhere to 4th-level sorcerers being able to abandon one spell and take up another. Admittedly my players and I run wizards and not sorcerers, but I don't think I'd miss something as (seemingly) obvious as a caster being able to unlearn a spell and learn a new one. Or would I?

Richard, sir, what, pray, didst thou mean? (If it's just a rule I've overlooked, a simple reference to the appropriate page will suffice.)




I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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TomCosta
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
419 Posts

Posted - 30 Mar 2007 :  20:58:01  Show Profile Send TomCosta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Reread the sorcerer's spellcasting section in the 3.5E PH. They can swap out their spells known as they get more powerful, so sleep, which is great for a low level character but almost useless for a higher level one, is an easy choice to drop.
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Purple Dragon Knight
Master of Realmslore

Canada
1792 Posts

Posted - 31 Mar 2007 :  00:02:26  Show Profile  Click to see Purple Dragon Knight's MSN Messenger address Send Purple Dragon Knight a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Jamallo: click on the link on my sig; from there, select "Classes 2" and look under "Spells" in the Sorcerer section. Bards also have a similar feature by the way.
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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 04 Apr 2007 :  01:56:39  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This is a rule that changed between 3rd Edition and 3.5. Sorcerers gained a limited "swap-out" feature that allowed them to retire spells obsoleted at later levels. When you're a 1st-level sorcerer, sleep looks like a critically important choice. At 10th level, you never cast it anymore, but something like charm person or shield is a spell you might still occasionally use.


quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

My enlightenment now lapses.

I got Dungeons & Dragons for Dummies yesterday (hey! -- it was well-reviewed in Dragon!) and ran across the following sentence on pp 344-345 which left me totally confused: {Re:sleep} "In fact, many players with sorcerer characters use their 4th-level spell swap to chuck sleep and learn something else." I don't understand that at all. I can't find a reference anywhere to 4th-level sorcerers being able to abandon one spell and take up another. Admittedly my players and I run wizards and not sorcerers, but I don't think I'd miss something as (seemingly) obvious as a caster being able to unlearn a spell and learn a new one. Or would I?

Richard, sir, what, pray, didst thou mean? (If it's just a rule I've overlooked, a simple reference to the appropriate page will suffice.)






Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 06 Apr 2007 :  21:07:41  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

This is a rule that changed between 3rd Edition and 3.5. Sorcerers gained a limited "swap-out" feature that allowed them to retire spells obsoleted at later levels. When you're a 1st-level sorcerer, sleep looks like a critically important choice. At 10th level, you never cast it anymore, but something like charm person or shield is a spell you might still occasionally use.



Thanks!

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Kaladorm
Master of Realmslore

United Kingdom
1176 Posts

Posted - 17 Apr 2007 :  23:55:35  Show Profile  Visit Kaladorm's Homepage Send Kaladorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Rich, sorry to press a point, but I'd just like to know if you have an answer at all for my previous question? Just asking as it's on the previous page and I thought you may have missed it
Thanks
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RichardBaker
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

129 Posts

Posted - 24 Apr 2007 :  22:43:07  Show Profile  Visit RichardBaker's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Darn it, should have caught that sooner. My bad, it's a good question.

First, Valas was pretty reliable in drow terms. I think it was a sense of mercenary professionalism--he wants to demonstrate that he's competent and reliable in order to maintain his "rep."

Second, I think the others recognized that there might be unpleasant consequences if they returned to Menzoberranzan and somehow their fearless Baenre leader just hadn't managed to survive the trip. If nothing else, the draegloth would pose an immediate problem if he thought the others had let Quenthel die.





quote:
Originally posted by Kaladorm

Rich, sorry to press a point, but I'd just like to know if you have an answer at all for my previous question? Just asking as it's on the previous page and I thought you may have missed it
Thanks


Rich Baker
Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
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Phoebus
Seeker

18 Posts

Posted - 28 Apr 2007 :  15:22:44  Show Profile  Visit Phoebus's Homepage  Send Phoebus a Yahoo! Message Send Phoebus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hello Rich,

I was hoping you might be able to share some background information about some of the elven folk during the Crown Wars. Lost Empires of Faerun does an excellent job (in my humble opinion) of casting some light on that series of conflicts, but I (and others, I would imagine) was left with some questions about "how things were" back then.

When reading the Crown Wars chapter, the timeline, accompanying text, and additional items (such as the description of the Iron Pit) gave me what I felt was a clear enough view into Ilythiir so as to plausibly identify them with a society "worthy" of becoming the Drow so feared in the Realms today. I also understood the role the Vyshaan clan played in that grand game, and that of their infernal patron as well.

What about the Aryvandaaran sun elves as a whole, though? How do they reconcile with their rulers' attempts and actions? Were they debased and decadent enough to merit being called "evil" in their own way as many of the Ilythiiri were? Or were they dupes in a grand power play? I'm very curious to know what their society thought about the Crown Wars and their rulers as the conflicts broiled on--especially after the Elven Court's verdict was laid down.

I ask because, as you mentioned in an earlier post, there is a negative label often attached to the Sun/Gold Elves... and I'm curious to know if they merited it at that time. Think of all of the titanic debates you could settle if only you would answer the above 3-4 questions!!!

/R
Phoebus

Edited by - Phoebus on 28 Apr 2007 15:25:05
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Kaladorm
Master of Realmslore

United Kingdom
1176 Posts

Posted - 29 Apr 2007 :  00:31:46  Show Profile  Visit Kaladorm's Homepage Send Kaladorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RichardBaker

Darn it, should have caught that sooner. My bad, it's a good question.

First, Valas was pretty reliable in drow terms. I think it was a sense of mercenary professionalism--he wants to demonstrate that he's competent and reliable in order to maintain his "rep."

Second, I think the others recognized that there might be unpleasant consequences if they returned to Menzoberranzan and somehow their fearless Baenre leader just hadn't managed to survive the trip. If nothing else, the draegloth would pose an immediate problem if he thought the others had let Quenthel die.

quote:
Originally posted by Kaladorm

Rich, sorry to press a point, but I'd just like to know if you have an answer at all for my previous question? Just asking as it's on the previous page and I thought you may have missed it
Thanks





Thanks for shedding some light on that , I figured that would be the reason but its nice to have it clarified. I'd also like to say thanks for writing it, it was a very enjoyable book, amongst all the others of the series as well.

Whilst we're on the topic, and I'm not sure it happened in Condemnation but sadly I can't remember which, do you happen to know how Nimor escaped when Gromph trapped him in the plane of shadow? I couldn't remember and neither could Reefy who's just read the series, and no one on candlekeep has offered a solution yet.

If you don't know the answer then I understand but I thought I'd try. Oh and I realise it's a long time ago but I read city of Ravens recently and I 'loved' all the intrigue of the balls. I've started reading Masquerades and deep down I was hoping it would offer something close to City of Ravens
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Zanan
Senior Scribe

Germany
942 Posts

Posted - 29 Apr 2007 :  10:31:58  Show Profile  Visit Zanan's Homepage Send Zanan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hello Mr. Baker!

Some people over at the German boards mentioned with surprise that the cambion template included in Expedition to the Demonweb Pits shows uneven ability modifiers, e.g. +5 for STR. Given that this goes against the traditional usage of such bonuses, are we going to see more of this in the future?
I for one would not have any problems, as "monster" ability scores start off with 10 or 11 anyway, yet some concerns were raised with regards to min-maxing and future products (i.e., not necessarily cambion characters).

Speaking of which, do designers tend to double-check on such possibilities, i.e. min/maxing? While I accept that this style of play is an popular option for some, I hope that for the sake of flair and background, classes/races/etc. are not toned down because of this.

Thanks in advance, Zanan!

Cave quid dicis, quando et cui!

Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel!

In memory of Alura Durshavin.

Visit my "Homepage" to find A Guide to the Drow NPCs of Faerûn, Drow and non-Drow PrC and much more.

Edited by - Zanan on 29 Apr 2007 10:32:49
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