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SiriusBlack
Great Reader

USA
5517 Posts

Posted - 03 May 2005 :  20:53:23  Show Profile  Visit SiriusBlack's Homepage Send SiriusBlack a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Xysma

quote:
Originally posted by Lord Rad
Also, I have just read The Silverfish from Dragon magazine:


Rad, what issue of Dragon?



Dragon Magazine #327.
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Lauzoril
Seeker

Finland
71 Posts

Posted - 05 May 2005 :  07:33:52  Show Profile  Visit Lauzoril's Homepage Send Lauzoril a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Greetings, Richard

I've enjoyed the Rite a lot, especially how the banter between Pavel and Will keeps on going. Despite that, there's one thing with Will which has puzzled me. Maybe I'm confusing it with some other setting but while Pavel was imprisoned by the ogres and Will had to stumble through the dark temple, I wondered why he couldn't see in the dark since I recall reading from somewhere that halflings can see in the dark like elves and orcs can.

"Death to the enemies of Bane."
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monch9
Seeker

Poland
67 Posts

Posted - 05 May 2005 :  08:19:25  Show Profile  Visit monch9's Homepage Send monch9 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Lauzoril


Maybe I'm confusing it with some other setting but while Pavel was imprisoned by the ogres and Will had to stumble through the dark temple, I wondered why he couldn't see in the dark since I recall reading from somewhere that halflings can see in the dark like elves and orcs can.




I'll take this one.

Halflings in DnD (at least in the 3rd edition) don't have darkvision (or even low-light vision). Ogres have darkvision up to 60 ft.

Monch
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
4788 Posts

Posted - 10 May 2005 :  08:28:30  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I just finished The Rite and found it an enjoyable read in terms of its 'closeness' to the published Realms. More so than The Rage. I enjoyed the portrayal of Damara and its leaders, and loved the look at the Monastery of the Yellow Rose (although I would have liked a bit more info on the monks there, what they do, etc.).

That said, like most middle books of a trilogy, I found myself metaphorically treading water for much of it, wishing to find out more about the Rage, the elven role in its creation and more on Sammaster. On all three topics I got practically no information of substance - and what I did get was crammed into a couple of paragraphs at the end.

A good read but I didn't feel that the trilogy plot unfolded enough during the course of the novel. You could conceivably skip The Rite and read The Ruin and not miss much in terms of what's going on, although there was some decent character development - a bit like a long-running soap opera.

Looking forward to The Ruin so I can get some answers!

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 23 Jun 2005 :  18:35:11  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have just started 'the Rage', and thus far I have been very impressed with its difference from all the other Realms novels I have read. I like the way that it is written, for example, the chapter about Dorn's background, and also the following chapter where Kara is introduced to the story in a very intriguing way.

What really fascinated me was the way that the text reflects on the rules, feats, templates, races and magic of the D&D Forgotten Realms. For the first time I could really see the action in "game terms", which was very refreshing for a change (The battle with the ooze drake, for example). I really felt that the author not only knew the "rules of the game", but also the relevant accessories (Races of Faerun, Magic of Faerun, FRCS, etcetera), and had used a lot of the information from those tomes. In all the FR novels I have read so far, the action and the characters are usually described in "real world" terms, with each encounter and sword stroke being potentially lethal, even to the largest monsters and the stoutest warrior.

IMHO if a novel is based on fantasy world using a distinct set of game rules, the novel should reflect and utilise those rules in the text. This novel seems to do it very well.

So I have been impressed with your text, Richard. My thanks for this very different and exciting novel - keep up the good work!

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 23 Jun 2005 :  22:01:51  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the kind words. Glad you're enjoying it.
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Krafus
Learned Scribe

246 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2005 :  14:03:50  Show Profile  Visit Krafus's Homepage  Send Krafus an AOL message Send Krafus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mr. Byers, I'm reading and enjoying The Rite for the third time, and a question has come to me: of what age category was Ishenalyr? (Pity about his death, too. He was an interesting villain, one who used his brain.)
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2005 :  17:36:50  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
To be completely honest, Krafus, at this late date I don't even recall if I actually assigned Ishenalyr to a specifc age category a la the Monster Manual. All I can tell you is, he's supposed to be an old and powerful wyrm, and if you statted him out for gaming, he would also have levels in the Hidecarved dragon Prestige Class from Draconomicon.
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2005 :  17:59:20  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Richard Lee Byers

To be completely honest, Krafus, at this late date I don't even recall if I actually assigned Ishenalyr to a specifc age category a la the Monster Manual. All I can tell you is, he's supposed to be an old and powerful wyrm, and if you statted him out for gaming, he would also have levels in the Hidecarved dragon Prestige Class from Draconomicon.



Richard,

Can I quote that in my Ed Greenwood and misc replies from various authors/game designers file? I want to make sure it's okay before I do so. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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Krafus
Learned Scribe

246 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2005 :  21:50:33  Show Profile  Visit Krafus's Homepage  Send Krafus an AOL message Send Krafus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Richard Lee Byers

To be completely honest, Krafus, at this late date I don't even recall if I actually assigned Ishenalyr to a specifc age category a la the Monster Manual. All I can tell you is, he's supposed to be an old and powerful wyrm, and if you statted him out for gaming, he would also have levels in the Hidecarved dragon Prestige Class from Draconomicon.



All right. I've put him in the Ancient age size category, which gives him Gargantuan size. I believe that's appropriate, since he was the biggest dragon at the siege next to Malazan (who I would put as a Colossal Great Wyrm), and among the twoscore or so dragons at the siege, there must have been at least a few who were of the Huge size category (which is the size category immediately preceding Gargantuan). I unfortunately don't own the Draconomicon, a situation I intend to correct as soon as money allows, but to compensate I've given Ishenalyr the caster level of a green dragon one age category above Ancient (15th level). Does that sound realistic?
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2005 :  16:40:06  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kuje: Sure you can quote that.
Krafus: Yep, that sounds fine.
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Jindael
Senior Scribe

USA
357 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  19:57:45  Show Profile  Visit Jindael's Homepage Send Jindael a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I just finished reading The Black Bouquet (but not this entire thread, so I apologise if I repeat something that's already been said) and I really enjoyed it. I absolutly loved how the Bouquet itself wasn't some artifact of world destroying power, but, rather...well, what it was. I also really enjoyed the small twists on cliche in each characters ending.

I found all the characters likable and believable in their roles, which is fantastic on a book about theives. And the writing about the Monk was just great fun to read.

In another interesting discovery, I could throw a rock from where I am and hit your house.

Well, if I could throw a rock about 35 miles. What? I could roll a 20.

"You don't have a Soul. You are a Soul. You have a body."
-- C.S. Lewis
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2005 :  22:17:40  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Glad you enjoyed it, Jindael.
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Sir Vengeance
Seeker

42 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2005 :  00:44:08  Show Profile  Visit Sir Vengeance's Homepage Send Sir Vengeance a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I had read the Rage and the Rite and I am certainly very impressed with the plot and character development, it genuinely looks like an real RSE to me. Still, I am a bit confused, if the author does not mind my asking, I have some questions:

1) Strange that wryms of both metal and non-metal wrym variety value treasure hoards more than anything, how is it that they so covet such treasure like dwarves when they had no needs to spend the treasure on.

2) How did the metal wryms came to distinguish themselves from the non-metal variety, what drove the metal wryms to differentiate themselves from the non-metal wryms?

3) Does wryms such as magma drakes, swamp drakes and shadow wryms fall under the categories of red, blue, black , green and white as they possess colour characteristics such as black or red scales while being known as magma or swamp drakes.

4) Does the shadow wryms fall under the black wrym category? But the shadow wryms seemed to be part of the shadow, so do they come under the black wrym category or a different category?

Vengeance is justified on righteous grounds, for righteous vengeance cannot be denied by anybody.
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2005 :  06:10:01  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sir Vengeance: Glad you're enjoying the trilogy. I'm not sure I can give complete answers to all your questions, but I'll give it a try.

1. Why do dragons covet treasure? Well, this is a basic fact of dragon psychology as defined by the rules of D&D and the lore of the Forgotten Realms, which is to say, I didn't make it up or work out the underlying logic. I would speculate that dragons prize their hoards in part for their beauty, in part because they know that wealth is a source of power and status among other sentient beings, and in part because they can turn many of the magic items contained in such hoards to practical use.

2. Why do the metallics distinguish themselves from the chromatics, and vice versa? Again, this is in the source material, not something I made up myself. But I would speculate that aside from the obvious cosmetic differences, there are basic and essentially irreconcilable psychological differences between the two families of dragons. To fall into gamespeak, metallics tend toward Good alignment, and chromatics toward Evil.

3. The drake species are distinct from their larger and more powerful cousins, the true dragons. In my opinion, a drake whose fundamental nature partakes of fire (like a magma drake) is closely related to the red dragons, a drake with ties to cold is closely related to the white dragons, etc.

4. Shadow dragons are not the same thing as black dragons. Shadow dragons are wyrms linked to the Plane of Shadow, where they are often encountered (as they were in my story.) Black dragons are purely and simply creatures of the mortal, physical plane.
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Shadovar
Senior Scribe

785 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2005 :  06:15:52  Show Profile  Visit Shadovar's Homepage Send Shadovar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The first two books of the year of the rogue dragons are wondrous and much to my admiration, which I had been reading for more than 7 times already.

Excuse my asking, i have noted that wryms breath weapons need to "reload" their breath weapons and do they need food like undead wryms to "reload" their breath weapons and how do they infuse their breath weapons with essences like shadow or lightning?

We have fostered trust, recruited loyalty, and gathered the faithful. We have trained thousands. Our legions can cover the land, fill the sky and travel through the darkness. We can hunt any and all that would deny our heritage. Now is our time, now is the time of the Dark Reign(Rain) of the Empire of Shadows.
- High Prince Telemont Tanthul, Lord Shadow
In a speech given to the citizens of Shade Enclave
At the celebration of the Shinantra Battle victory when he revealed that he was THE Lord Shadow of legend.
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2005 :  19:35:48  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Shadovar: Glad you're enjoying the trilogy.
The D&D rules tell us that dragons can't use their breath weapons every single "round" (in other words, constantly), and that's why you see the power needing to recharge in my story.
If we take the long view, they would ultimately need to eat to renew this biological function just as they would need sustenance to keep all their other physical systems working. But that's not a requirement that they would need to address in the middle of a fight.
When you see a dragon in the story alter the basic nature of its breath weapon, or infuse it with some additional power, it's accomplishing that with a spell.
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Shadovar
Senior Scribe

785 Posts

Posted - 20 Jul 2005 :  13:28:01  Show Profile  Visit Shadovar's Homepage Send Shadovar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Richard Lee Byers

Shadovar: Glad you're enjoying the trilogy.
The D&D rules tell us that dragons can't use their breath weapons every single "round" (in other words, constantly), and that's why you see the power needing to recharge in my story.
If we take the long view, they would ultimately need to eat to renew this biological function just as they would need sustenance to keep all their other physical systems working. But that's not a requirement that they would need to address in the middle of a fight.
When you see a dragon in the story alter the basic nature of its breath weapon, or infuse it with some additional power, it's accomplishing that with a spell.



I understand now, Thank you.

We have fostered trust, recruited loyalty, and gathered the faithful. We have trained thousands. Our legions can cover the land, fill the sky and travel through the darkness. We can hunt any and all that would deny our heritage. Now is our time, now is the time of the Dark Reign(Rain) of the Empire of Shadows.
- High Prince Telemont Tanthul, Lord Shadow
In a speech given to the citizens of Shade Enclave
At the celebration of the Shinantra Battle victory when he revealed that he was THE Lord Shadow of legend.
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2005 :  02:07:26  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here there be Dragons

In the 3.0 FR DM Screen it included a booklet for generating Wandering Monster encounters (including Dragons) The booklet is several years old so the Dragon frequency is set for "regular years" given that Faeruns Dragons are more "active" in the Year of Rogue Dragons how much more common do you think they should be on the Tables?

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2005 :  02:49:30  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yikes, Dargoth, that's more a question for a game designer than a mere novelist.
But I guess we can look at the variables. As you note, dragons in the throes of Rage are active. Real active. But there are factors that might counterbalance that. One is that

(here's a SPOILER WARNING for those who haven't read the stories)

for much of the year, most of the metallic dragons are sleeping, and most of the gem dragons have decamped to the Elemental Planes, where the Rage can't get them. Also, the chromatics have for the most part gathered into Flights.
So just off the top of my head, I'd say that the chances of some sort of dragon encounter might be just about the same as usual. But if you're unlucky enough to have one, it's likely to be very, very ugly.
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2005 :  06:25:59  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
(Im assuming youve got the booklet from the FR Dungeon Masters screen to refer to)

How about this for a rule

If a drgaon of any sort is rolled on tables 23-61 1d4 should then be rolled to determined the number of Dragons appearing.

For example while tavelling through Northern Hills (Table 23) the DM roles a 23 for a wandering monster encounter) this signifies a Dragon. The DM then rolls 1d4 and gets 3. He moves on to Table 23A Northern Hills Dragons and rolls percentiles 3 times

He gets

57
35
21

The party have encountered a Flight of Dragons made up of a Very Young Red Dragon Dracolich, a Young Shadow Dragon and Juvenile White Dragon.

If on any of the rolls a Metalic Dragon is indicated then the DM can choose to either roll on the table again or the Metalic Dragon they encounter was not put to sleep and has been affected by the Rage.


“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2005 :  16:47:08  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sounds okay to me, except that you're not going to encounter a dracolich among a Flight of dragons experiencing the Rage. Dracoliches are immune to the Rage.
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2005 :  20:20:00  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Richard,



When reading the first book of the WOTSQ I immediately though of Fafhrd and Mouser whenever I read about Ryld and Pharaun. I know the characters overall where kind of made up in comitee, but did you have any influence from Leiber in mind when writing those two?

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2005 :  20:31:18  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
KnightErrant: I didn't consciously have Fafhrd and the Mouser in mind, but since Leiber is my favorite fantasy writer, my fond memories of those characters may well have influenced me even so.
By the way, Ryld and Pharaun weren't "made up in committee" beyond the committee deciding that we would have one Master of Sorcere and one Master of Melee-Magthere as core characters in the series. I took it from there, so I think I can validly claim much of the credit for creating these two guys (just as the other authors deserve the credit for creating any characters who first appeared in the installments they wrote.)
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2005 :  20:37:07  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good, then you can accept the praise that I absolutely loved those two characters . . . and while the other writers made them enjoyable, they truly shined when you wrote them in the first book. Sorry about the misunderstanding about the creation process, and thanks for the answer.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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