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sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
9896 Posts

Posted - 27 Dec 2020 :  17:00:56  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Returnip

quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Were they inclined to justify their practices, they may choose to use such reasoning. As it stands, they probably liken humans and/or comparable species to cattle (in explicit role) or insects (in intellect); they wouldn't bother with the "courtesy" of cushioning their actions with an explanation.



Even in a society where that is the norm there will exist outliers who will reflect upon the norms and possibly question them. I would argue that this is even more true among highly intelligent species, such as Mindflayers.



Vegan illithids! They only eat myconids!



<frightened camprestris huddle in the corner and quiver>

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 30 Dec 2020 :  20:49:17  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Returnip

quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Were they inclined to justify their practices, they may choose to use such reasoning. As it stands, they probably liken humans and/or comparable species to cattle (in explicit role) or insects (in intellect); they wouldn't bother with the "courtesy" of cushioning their actions with an explanation.



Even in a society where that is the norm there will exist outliers who will reflect upon the norms and possibly question them. I would argue that this is even more true among highly intelligent species, such as Mindflayers.



There may be outliers in Illithid society, but they are exceedingly rare (as is the case with most Aberrations). As for intelligence...there is no shortage of intelligent sociopaths. I'd argue that wisdom and its attendant benefits (e.g., greater perception, empathy and understanding of consequences) are more likely to produce individuals less likely to torture others, but even that is no guarantee; there is no shortage of entities with high Wisdom scores and Evil Alignments.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  11:19:02  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Azar

quote:
Originally posted by Returnip

quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Were they inclined to justify their practices, they may choose to use such reasoning. As it stands, they probably liken humans and/or comparable species to cattle (in explicit role) or insects (in intellect); they wouldn't bother with the "courtesy" of cushioning their actions with an explanation.



Even in a society where that is the norm there will exist outliers who will reflect upon the norms and possibly question them. I would argue that this is even more true among highly intelligent species, such as Mindflayers.



There may be outliers in Illithid society, but they are exceedingly rare (as is the case with most Aberrations). As for intelligence...there is no shortage of intelligent sociopaths. I'd argue that wisdom and its attendant benefits (e.g., greater perception, empathy and understanding of consequences) are more likely to produce individuals less likely to torture others, but even that is no guarantee; there is no shortage of entities with high Wisdom scores and Evil Alignments.



Your choice of diet could be linked to lawful-chaotic axis rather than good-evil in my opinion. People eating meat usually have nothing to do with being evil rather than just tradition.

EDIT: To elaborate, if eating sentient, intelligent creatures was evil it would mean the majority of all humans are evil. This is because we are omnivores and can sustain ourselves on a vegetarian diet, needing only a fish a week or so to get some Omega 3. If we live in a warm, sunny climate even that might be superfluous. But most humans choose to eat meat anyway.

On that subject we can look at how we're biologically built. The aforementioned Illithids need sustenance from intelligent creatures to function normally. I recall reading somewhere about an Illithid that was trapped in some way and had to survive on animals like rats and such. This eventually led to it becoming more and more feral in nature because when feeding they absorb the victim's memories and personality. I would argue that this kind of deficiency disease would also be a result of farming beholders for food. While beholders have a high mental capacity, farmed beholders don't acquire a wide variety of memories, and the amount of experience needed to shape a nutritious personality.

Therefor I would argue that assuming someone eat what they need to function normally, the choice of diet is a matter of tradition or personal values and principle. An Illithid that is lazy enough to farm beholders for convenient food is basically eating junk food. It sustains them and keeps them alive, but over time the nourishment they need to thrive is lacking and they'll become lethargic.

Humans can benefit equally from a mostly vegetarian diet as they can from an omnivorous one assuming they know how to get all the nutrients they need which in turn assumes a familiarity with the diet in question, and that in turn suggests tradition which is connected to lawful alignment.

An Illithid that wants to eat healthy but doesn't want to go hunting themself would perhaps have others hunt and capture wild creatures for them to feed on.

On the other hand you have different fingers.

Edited by - Returnip on 31 Dec 2020 14:42:46
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  14:55:45  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Returnip, my previous comment was addressing the morality of Illithid practices that go beyond the consumption of intelligent brains: slavery and mind-rape. That said, there isn't much condemnation of regular meat-eating in Dungeons & Dragons. Elves - typically "Big Goods" in most settings - hunt animals for sustenance (carefully, but they do) and some inhabitants of the Good-aligned outer planes hunt for their food without losing their celestial status. Adamantite Dragons are arguably the noblest a dragon can get short of possessing actual divine heritage, but they too consume flesh.

quote:
AD&D Monstrous Compendium Outer Planes MC8 - Dragon, Adamantite

Climate/Terrain: Twin Paradises (Bytopia)
Diet: Carnivore
Intelligence: Genius (17-18)
Alignment: Neutral good

Adamantite dragons are perhaps the mightiest of dragonkind. They are the epitome of good, sacrificing whatever is necessary for the common good of intelligent creatures everywhere.

...

The adamantite dragons are the sell-appointed guardians of the Twin Paradises. These great creatures are extremely powerful and will come to the aid of any intelligent creature. It should be noted, however, that they are unconcerned with law or chaos, but only the protection of sentient lifeforms.

...

Adamantite dragons have little place in the ecosystem of the Twin Paradises. They can, however, be avaricious hunters with huge appetites. Adamantite dragons have no moral objection to hunting unintelligent lifeforms for food.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  15:08:11  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Returnip, my previous comment was addressing the morality of Illithid practices that go beyond the consumption of intelligent brains: slavery and mind-rape.


I see. I read you wrong then.

EDIT: I should add that I find this discussion incredibly stimulating and it's given me a lot of ideas that I'll implement in my next campaign.

Perhaps the players are hired by someone to capture alive a certain creature, and bring it to their employer for a big reward. They have to build a holding cage and come up with a plan. If they question the employer they might learn that he or she is just an intermediary for someone with certain "exotic tastes".

On the other hand you have different fingers.

Edited by - Returnip on 31 Dec 2020 15:13:42
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  15:34:51  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Returnip

quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Returnip, my previous comment was addressing the morality of Illithid practices that go beyond the consumption of intelligent brains: slavery and mind-rape.


I see. I read you wrong then.

EDIT: I should add that I find this discussion incredibly stimulating and it's given me a lot of ideas that I'll implement in my next campaign.

Perhaps the players are hired by someone to capture alive a certain creature, and bring it to their employer for a big reward. They have to build a holding cage and come up with a plan. If they question the employer they might learn that he or she is just an intermediary for someone with certain "exotic tastes".



Here is an example of a Good-aligned Illithid. Curiously, she doesn't rely on a Ring of Sustenance.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  15:44:37  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Azar

quote:
Originally posted by Returnip

quote:
Originally posted by Azar

Returnip, my previous comment was addressing the morality of Illithid practices that go beyond the consumption of intelligent brains: slavery and mind-rape.


I see. I read you wrong then.

EDIT: I should add that I find this discussion incredibly stimulating and it's given me a lot of ideas that I'll implement in my next campaign.

Perhaps the players are hired by someone to capture alive a certain creature, and bring it to their employer for a big reward. They have to build a holding cage and come up with a plan. If they question the employer they might learn that he or she is just an intermediary for someone with certain "exotic tastes".



Here is an example of a Good-aligned Illithid. Curiously, she doesn't rely on a Ring of Sustenance.



Hm. I wonder if Illithids actually need to eat brains at all or if it's just chocolate mousse with whipped cream for them? It is said to be a euphoric experience for them. Maybe they don't require intelligent brains for sustenance? Is that explicitly stated anywhere? Perhaps it's fully possible for them to survive as vegetarians or at least with some sort of more ascetic diet?

On the other hand you have different fingers.

Edited by - Returnip on 31 Dec 2020 15:45:58
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
34467 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  19:15:58  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Returnip


Perhaps the players are hired by someone to capture alive a certain creature, and bring it to their employer for a big reward. They have to build a holding cage and come up with a plan. If they question the employer they might learn that he or she is just an intermediary for someone with certain "exotic tastes".



The capture and return idea is always a more challenging one for the PCs... And it doesn't have to be for food. Maybe the person that wants the critter has their own menagerie. Maybe they intend to release it in a specific area and hunt it themselves, under more controlled (and favorable to them) circumstances than would occur in the wild. Maybe a wizard needs to harvest the critter's adrenal glands, but they have to be fresh when used....

This is all part of why I will always lament the move away from the 2E style of monster write-ups. In the 2E Monstrous Compendiums, each critter got at least a full page. Half the page was stats and art, but the other half was combat, organization, habitat/lair, preferred treasure, ecology -- and what you could use the critter for, whole or in pieces. Monster write-ups since then have lacked that information, turning the monsters into a bag of XP and GP.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

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Ayrik
Great Reader

Canada
7356 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  19:19:25  Show Profile Send Ayrik a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The Illithiad explained that illithids can survive, if necessary, by consuming the brains (tissues, fluids, thoughts) of "lesser" species. Presumably meaning the unintelligent, animal, or monstrous creatures they would never normally consume. But it's not a healthy diet for them, it causes starvation of mind and body, they grow physically weak and they lose psionic abilities. They go insane - no details are given about exactly what this means or how it's expressed - although the ones which show signs of "reverting" or "resonating" to the cognitive patterns of their host are relentlessly hunted by their brethren. (They use physical and psychic surgeries to excise the troublesome thoughts and memories, some of their subjects live, some die, some are too damaged for the process or become too damaged by the process and must be destroyed. They are not eaten and they are not returned to the brainpool because of possible taint or contagion.)

[/Ayrik]

Edited by - Ayrik on 31 Dec 2020 19:20:45
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  19:57:08  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ayrik

The Illithiad explained that illithids can survive, if necessary, by consuming the brains (tissues, fluids, thoughts) of "lesser" species. Presumably meaning the unintelligent, animal, or monstrous creatures they would never normally consume. But it's not a healthy diet for them, it causes starvation of mind and body, they grow physically weak and they lose psionic abilities. They go insane - no details are given about exactly what this means or how it's expressed - although the ones which show signs of "reverting" or "resonating" to the cognitive patterns of their host are relentlessly hunted by their brethren. (They use physical and psychic surgeries to excise the troublesome thoughts and memories, some of their subjects live, some die, some are too damaged for the process or become too damaged by the process and must be destroyed. They are not eaten and they are not returned to the brainpool because of possible taint or contagion.)



So that's a no then. Thanks for the clarification. What do you mean by brainpool? What is that and what purpose does it serve?

On the other hand you have different fingers.
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Ayrik
Great Reader

Canada
7356 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  20:53:49  Show Profile Send Ayrik a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The brainpool is the center of an illithid settlement. It holds the collective consciousness of all living and dead illithids from the community. It's the nursery for their tadpoles. It's conscious, intelligent, telepathic, it links them all. If it has absorbed enough illithids, enough lifetimes, enough experiences, then it can project formidable psychic powers over a large radius.

It's explained in every monster manual entry for illithids (mind flayers).

[/Ayrik]
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  21:11:24  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ayrik

The brainpool is the center of an illithid settlement. It holds the collective consciousness of all living and dead illithids from the community. It's the nursery for their tadpoles. It's conscious, intelligent, telepathic, it links them all. If it has absorbed enough illithids, enough lifetimes, enough experiences, then it can project formidable psychic powers over a large radius.

It's explained in every monster manual entry for illithids (mind flayers).



I had completely forgotten about that. Are there any stats for these elder brains somewhere?

On the other hand you have different fingers.
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 31 Dec 2020 :  22:39:11  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert


This is all part of why I will always lament the move away from the 2E style of monster write-ups. In the 2E Monstrous Compendiums, each critter got at least a full page. Half the page was stats and art, but the other half was combat, organization, habitat/lair, preferred treasure, ecology -- and what you could use the critter for, whole or in pieces. Monster write-ups since then have lacked that information, turning the monsters into a bag of XP and GP.



Wooly, you are so right it isn't funny.

--- --- ---
--- --- ---
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quote:
AD&D 2e - Ankheg

The ankheg is a burrowing monster usually found in forests or choice agricultural land. Because of its fondness for fresh meat, the ankheg is a threat to any creature unfortunate enough to encounter it.

The ankheg resembles an enormous many-legged worm. Its six legs end in sharp hooks suitable for burrowing and grasping, and its powerful mandibles are capable of snapping a small tree in half with a single bite. A tough chitinous shell, usually brown or yellow, covers its entire body except for its soft pink belly. The ankheg has glistening black eyes, a small mouth lined with tiny rows of chitinous teeth, and two sensitive antennae that can detect movement of man-sized creatures up to 300 feet away.

Combat: The ankheg’s preferred attack method is to lie 5 to 10 feet below the surface of the ground until its antennae detect the approach of a victim. It then burrows up beneath the victim and attempts to grab him in its mandibles, crushing and grinding for 3d6 points of damage per round while secreting acidic digestive enzymes to cause an additional 1d4 points of damage per round until the victim is dissolved. The ankheg can squirt a stream of acidic enzymes once every six hours to a distance of 30 feet. However, since it is unable to digest food for six hours after it squirts enzymes, it uses this attack technique only when desperate. A victim struck by the stream of acidic enzymes suffers 8d4 points of damage (half damage if the victim rolls a successful saving throw vs. poison).

Habitat/Society: The ankheg uses its mandibles to continuously dig winding tunnels 30-40 feet deep in the rich soil of forests or farmlands. The hollowed end of a tunnel serves as a temporary lair for sleeping, eating, or hibernating. When an ankheg exhausts the food supply in a particular forest or field, it moves on to another.

Autumn is mating season for ankhegs. After the male fertilizes the female, the female kills him and deposits 2d6 fertilized eggs in his body. Within a few weeks, about 75% of the eggs hatch and begin feeding. In a year, the young ankhegs resemble adults and can function independently. Young ankhegs have 2 Hit Dice and an AC 2 overall and an AC 4 for their undersides; they bite for 1d4 points of damage (with an additional 1d4 points of damage from enzyme secretions), and spit for 4d4 points of damage to a distance of 30 feet. In every year thereafter, the ankheg functions with full adult capabilities and gains an additional Hit Die until it reaches 8 Hit Dice. Beginning in its second year of life, the ankheg sheds its chitinous shell just before the onset of winter. It takes the ankheg two days to shed its old shell and two weeks to grow a new one. During this time, the sluggish ankheg is exceptionally vulnerable. Its overall AC is reduced to 5 and its underside AC is reduced to 7. Additionally, it moves at only half its normal speed, its mandible attack inflicts only 1d10 points of damage, and it is unable to squirt acidic enzymes. While growing a new shell, it protects itself by hiding in a deep tunnel and secreting a repulsive fluid that smells like rotten fruit. Though the aroma discourages most creatures, it can also pinpoint the ankheg’s location for human hunters and desperately hungry predators.

Ankhegs living in cold climates hibernate during the winter. Within a month after the first snowfall, the ankheg fashions a lair deep within the warm earth where it remains dormant until spring. The hibernating ankheg requires no food, subsisting instead on nutrients stored in its shell. The ankheg does not secrete aromatic fluid during this time and is thus relatively safe from detection. Though the ankheg’s metabolism is reduced, its antennae remain functional, able to alert it to the approach of an intruder. A disturbed ankheg fully awakens in 1d4 rounds, after which time it can attack and move normally.

The ankheg does not hoard treasure. Items that were not dissolved by the acidic enzymes fall where they drop from the ankheg’s mandibles and can be found scattered throughout its tunnel system.

Ecology: Though a hungry ankheg can be fatal to a farmer, it can be quite beneficial to the farmland. Its tunnel system laces the soil with passages for air and water, while the ankheg’s waste products add rich nutrients. The ankheg will eat decayed organic matter in the earth, but it prefers fresh meat. All but the fiercest predators avoid ankhegs. Dried and cured ankheg shells can be made into armor with an AC of 2, and its digestive enzymes can be used as regular acid.



quote:
D&D 3.5 - Ankheg

A huge segmented insect with slender legs, each ending in a sharp claw, emerges from the ground in a burst of rock and dirt. A tough chitinous brown shell covers its entire body, and glistening black eyes stare out from above powerful mandibles.

The ankheg is a burrowing monster with a taste for fresh meat. An ankheg has six legs, and some specimens are yellow rather than brown. It is about 10 feet long and weighs about 800 pounds.

An ankheg burrows with legs and mandibles. A burrowing ankheg usually does not make a usable tunnel, but can construct a tunnel; it burrows at half speed when it does so. It often digs a winding tunnel up to 40 feet below the surface in the rich soil of forests or farmlands. The tunnel is 5 feet tall and wide, and from 60to 150 feet long ([1d10 + 5] ×10). The hollowed ends of the tunnel serve as temporary lairs for sleeping, eating, or hibernating.

An ankheg can eat decayed organic matter but prefers fresh meat. Though a hungry ankheg might kill a farmer, the creature is quite beneficial to farmland. Its tunnel system laces the soil with passages for air and water, while its wastes add rich nutrients.


---

quote:
AD&D 2E - Red Dragon

Red dragons are the most covetous and greedy of all dragons, forever seeking to increase their treasure hoards. They are obsessed with their wealth and memorize an inventory accurate to the last copper. They are exceptionally vain and self confident, considering themselves superior not only to other dragons, but to all other life in general.

When red dragons hatch, their small scales are a bright glossy scarlet. Because of this, they can be quickly spotted by predators and men hunting for skins, so they are hidden in deep underground lairs and not permitted to venture outside until toward the end of their young stage when their scales become turned a deeper red, the glossy texture has been replaced by a smooth, dull finish, and they are more able to take care of themselves. As the dragon continues to age, the scales become large thick, and as strong as metal.

Red dragons speak their own tongue, a tongue common to all evil dragons, and 16% of hatchling red dragons have an ability to communicate with any intelligent creature. The chance to possess this ability increases 5% per age category of the dragon.

Combat: Because red dragons are so confident, they never pause to appraise an adversary. When they notice a target they make a snap decision whether to attack, using one of many “perfect” strategies worked out ahead of time in the solitude of their lairs. If the creature appears small and insignificant, such as an unarmored man, the dragon will land to attack with its claws and bite, not wanting to obliterate the creature with its breath weapon, as any treasure might be consumed by the flames. However, if a red dragon encounters a group of armored men, it will use its breath weapon, special abilities, and spells (if it is old enough to have them) before landing.

Breath Weapon/Special Abilities: A red dragon’s breath weapon is a searing cone of fire 90’ long, 5’ wide at the dragon’s mouth and 30’ at the base. Creatures struck by the flames must save versus breath weapon for half damage. Red dragons cast spells at 9th level, adjusted by their combat modifiers.

Red dragons are born immune to fire. As they age, they gain the following additional powers:

Young: affect normal fires three times per day. Juvenile: pyrotechnics three times per day. Adult: heat metal once per day. Old: suggestion once per day. Very old: hypnotism once per day. Venerable: detect gems, kind and number in a 100’ radius three times a day.

Habitat/Society: Red dragons can be found on great hills or on soaring mountains. From a high perch they haughtily survey their territory, which they consider to be everything that can be seen from their position. They prefer to lair in large caves that extend deep into the earth.

A red dragon enjoys its own company, not associating with other creatures, or even other red dragons, unless the dragon’s aims can be furthered. For example, some red dragons who have charm spells will order men to act as the dragon’s eyes and ears, gathering information about nearby settlements and sources of treasure. When a red dragon’s offspring reach the young adult stage, they are ordered form the lair and the surrounding territory, as they are viewed as competition.

Red dragons are quick to fight all creatures which encroach on their territory, especially copper and silver dragons which sometimes share the same environment. The hate gold dragons above all else because they believe gold dragons are “nearly” as powerful as themselves.

Ecology: Red dragons are meat eaters, although they are capable of digesting almost anything. Their favorite food is a maiden of any human or demi-human race. Sometimes the dragons are able to charm key villagers into regularly sacrificing maidens to them.


quote:
D&D 3.5 - Red Dragon

The dragon has horns extending back over the neck, frilled ears, and smaller horns at the cheeks and chin, with rows of horns over the brows. The nose is beak like and sports a small horn. A frill begins behind the head and runs to the tip of the tail. The dragon reeks of smoke and sulfur, and its scales shine with shades of crimson and scarlet.

Red dragons are the most covetous of all dragons, forever seeking to increase their treasure hoards. They are exceptionally vain, which is reflected in their proud bearing and disdainful expression. The small scales of a wyrmling red dragon are a bright glossy scarlet, making the dragon easily spotted by predators and hunters, so it stays under ground and does not venture outside until it is more able to take care of itself. Toward the end of young age, the scales turn a deeper red, and the glossy texture is replaced by a smooth, dull finish. As the dragon grows older, the scales become large, thick, and as strong as metal. The neck frill and wings are an ash blue or purple-gray toward the edges, becoming darker with age. The pupils of a red dragon fade as it ages; the oldest red dragons have eyes that resemble molten lava orbs.

Red dragons lair in large caves that extend deep into the earth, which shimmer with the heat of their bodies and are marked by a sulfurous, smoky odor. However, they always have a high perch nearby from which to haughtily survey their territory, which they consider to be everything in sight. This high perch sometimes intrudes upon the territory of a silver dragon, and for this reason red dragons and silver dragons are often enemies.

Red dragons are meat eaters by preference, and their favorite food is a human or elven youth. Sometimes they charm villagers into regularly sacrificing townsfolk to them.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
9896 Posts

Posted - 01 Jan 2021 :  14:01:29  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
sadly, part of the reason I believe for the shorter monster manual entries was because people would have decried "We're just paying for reprints, I already have this info".... and I don't think they'd be wrong in predicting that. It is why so many of us hold to our old 2nd edition religion guides and such though.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 01 Jan 2021 :  16:44:33  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sleyvas

sadly, part of the reason I believe for the shorter monster manual entries was because people would have decried "We're just paying for reprints, I already have this info".... and I don't think they'd be wrong in predicting that. It is why so many of us hold to our old 2nd edition religion guides and such though.



If the entries were the same length but different, I would agree. However, much information not required for combat was straight-up cut out...removed. 3e D&D was the first edition of the tabletop RPG predominately influenced by video games from the outset; 4e was likewise molded by MMORPGs.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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mastermustard
Seeker

USA
68 Posts

Posted - 01 Jan 2021 :  16:56:37  Show Profile Send mastermustard a Private Message  Reply with Quote
This is frequently glossed over by writers and DM's but the reality is that FR is a brutal setting where the strong do as they please with the weak. Many, many people are starving, many are desperate. Unlike us with the privilege of a modern first-world lifestyle, I doubt many/most in the Realms have the luxury of caring where their meat comes from.
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Azar
Learned Scribe

184 Posts

Posted - 01 Jan 2021 :  17:19:51  Show Profile Send Azar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mastermustard

This is frequently glossed over by writers and DM's but the reality is that FR is a brutal setting where the strong do as they please with the weak. Many, many people are starving, many are desperate. Unlike us with the privilege of a modern first-world lifestyle, I doubt many/most in the Realms have the luxury of caring where their meat comes from.



The Realms can be that rough/grim if you want them to be, but, overall, the setting is not as brutal as, say, Dark Sun or Ravenloft. One advantage that inhabitants of that world have over us is magic; this advantage frequently manifests itself during the topic of medicine, but I imagine it is also easier to feed yourself when there are more options for growing/obtaining food compared to our Middle Ages.

Stand with anybody that stands right. Stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.
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Stones Finder
Acolyte

Canada
14 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2021 :  04:15:00  Show Profile Send Stones Finder a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Anybody remember the scene in Azure Bonds where Alias says that you aren't an adventurer until you've eaten something that tried to eat you? I always wondered if that was meant to include sentient "monsters..."

On a related note, Elaine's last(?) Liriel story includes an adventurer wearing armor made out of the red dragon his party killed. Liriel's response was - interesting...

Those who do not learn from the past are doomed to repeat it - Advice for the 5e design team
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Returnip
Learned Scribe

208 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2021 :  11:04:33  Show Profile Send Returnip a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Stones Finder

On a related note, Elaine's last(?) Liriel story includes an adventurer wearing armor made out of the red dragon his party killed. Liriel's response was - interesting...



Can you quote it?

On the other hand you have different fingers.
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Stones Finder
Acolyte

Canada
14 Posts

Posted - 07 Jan 2021 :  05:18:50  Show Profile Send Stones Finder a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Not in detail. IIRC, Liriel got annoyed with the guy, and cast Raise Dead on his armor, leaving the party to fight the dragon a second time - in a tavern, I believe...

Those who do not learn from the past are doomed to repeat it - Advice for the 5e design team
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