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Garen Thal
Master of Realmslore

USA
1081 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  00:24:34  Show Profile  Visit Garen Thal's Homepage Send Garen Thal a Private Message
Whistling innocently and staring at the ceiling, Garen winked. When Krashos the Sage finished his speculation, he turned on his heels, threw his hands up, and fled.

One could see Garen's sleeves rolling down to his elbows as he ran, cackling madly, down one of the halls of Candlekeep and disappeared.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  01:11:33  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello, all.

Krash, Ed tells me he’ll be sending an “elder runes” reply for you soon.
As for the matter of who’s head of the War Wizards: Caladnei certainly is (post-ELMINSTER’S DAUGHTER). Chairing “The College of” the War Wizards is a different thing than leading them. To put it in Australian (and Canadian) terms, it’s like having a Governor-General and a Prime Minister. The first has the formal, heraldic, empty power, and the latter runs the country (or pretends to).

Ed’s unfolding reply to Capn Charlie continues, as our march through a year reaches the hot months:



Flamerule 9 Fists
This is a day of jousting in Cormyr and Sembia and unarmed wrestling in Aglarond, Thay, Turmish and the Vilhon Reach in general, Westgate, the Dales, and among forest-dwellers across the Heartlands (yes, Wild Elves, too). In Thay, slave ‘champions’ are used in contests.
Much betting takes place, and there are usually some matches (‘frolics’) that involve unclad wrestlers of both genders, and/or oiled bodies to make everyone slippery, and/or wrestling in food (often the last mouldy ‘larder jellies’ [sugared fruit concoctions] left from the previous winter). Formally this was a day when real scores would be settled, sometimes to the death, under cover of these mock combats, but in almost all places this has been outlawed, and fierce punishments are enacted on those who try to harm foes or cause ‘accidents’ to befall rivals or enemies.
No real work takes place during Fists, except in taverns and among food-sellers at the various combat venues. In Cormyr, two days before Fists and four days after Fists are allowed ‘off work’ for traveling to and from events, and recovery from participation in them. A lot of games of skill (which are gambled upon enthusiastically) with cards, dice, thrown darts, and the like now take place on Fists, so the unathletic can participate by some means other than howling support and placing bets. Local wealthy merchants, officials, and rulers often ‘put up’ prizes for such contests, and for exhibitions of martial skill such as archery and ‘down-the-horse’ (wherein strongfolk strive to knock a full-sized horse off its hooves faster than rivals).

Eleasias 22 Misrule
Formerly a day when children could give their parents orders, apprentices could do the same to their masters, underpriests instruct and command their superiors, and so on, this “celebration” has been marred by much violence and repercussions down the years, and has evolved into a day when the apprentices of rival guilds clash in street brawls (in cities) for the title of “King of the Streets’ (usually trying to bring an actual high-backed wooden seat or ‘Throne’ to a central spot, and keep it there, whilst preventing other bands of brawlers from installing their thrones).
In rural areas, rather than battling over thrones, large mobs of youths gather for violent, landscape-spanning games of ‘Claim the Crown’ that last until sunset (when local rulers or temples provide meals and much drink, the latter usually laced with sleep-inducing substances to quell trouble).
Claim the Crown is a sport akin to Capture the Flag, involving two teams trying to outscore each other. A point is scored by bringing the Crown (who is usually a beautiful woman clad in polished-bright chainmail who must not be harmed, and who can choose to hide, flee, or cooperate), to established ‘goal’ spots, one for each team.
The Crown can be physically restrained (and is usually carried) by participants, but must not be rendered unconscious, bound, or confined within anything (in some local variants, the Crown is carried in an open coffin, or seeks to remove her armour and toss it away whilst the team possessing her seeks to prevent this; if she’s wearing less than half the pieces when she reaches the scoring spot, no point can be scored until she’s clad again).
Sometimes several Crowns take part in a Misrule match, one succeeding another as each becomes weary or overly battered. Local clergy and wizards heal participants, officiate the scoring, and magically teleport the Crown to various (usually random) spots so play can resume after each ‘claim.’ Claim the Crown is usually played in terrain affording cover, often rolling pastureland, woodlots, and forest - - but the scoring spots are usually hills or other easily-seen places.

Eleint 28 Brightswords
A day when guards and soldiers parade in glittering array, give demonstrations of martial skill (archery and bombardment are popular) or stage mock battles, and persons desiring to join their ranks are given chances to demonstrate their prowess (usually with wooden practise weapons, in contests against veteran soldiers). Weaponmakers and vendors sell their wares openly in the markets, experts who can hurl or juggle weapons show off their skills, and there are horse races open to all (including wagon races, and archery-from-the-saddle races). Wealthy merchants, local officials, and rulers give prizes (usually a trophy full of coins) to the winners of such contests - - and spies employed by most governments watch for promising recruits, known villains sneaking in to steal or purchase weapons, and sources of good weapons or well-trained mounts.



So saith Ed. Yes, there’ll be more to come tomorrow.
love to all,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  02:18:45  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
In case any scribes may have missed it, Wizards has posted an updated profile for Ed (well worth a read), that can be found at:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/greenwoodap2005


and a Silverfall (the novel, finally in print as a mass market paperback) “character profile,” a little bit of whimsical fun fiction by Ed that made me laugh at loud:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/silverfallcp


Enjoy, fellow Realms fans!
love to all,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 05 Jan 2005 02:20:43
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Jerryd
Seeker

USA
33 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  02:30:52  Show Profile  Visit Jerryd's Homepage Send Jerryd a Private Message
Sigh... ask for a simple (a) or (b) answer, and get (c) Both, plus further lore muddying the issue!

Then Scribe Krash spake thusly...
quote:
Originally posted by George Krashos

So one assumes, going by the above, that Caladnei is simply Mage Royal of Cormyr and NOT head of the War Wizards per se. Interesting ...

Then Ed replied...
quote:
Originally posted by Ed via THO

As for the matter of who’s head of the War Wizards: Caladnei certainly is (post-ELMINSTER’S DAUGHTER). Chairing “The College of” the War Wizards is a different thing than leading them. To put it in Australian (and Canadian) terms, it’s like having a Governor-General and a Prime Minister. The first has the formal, heraldic, empty power, and the latter runs the country (or pretends to).

So the title "Chairman Emperius" is a figurehead title and has no necessary connection to the person who actually leads the War Wizards.

The very title "chairman" implies to me that there is some "board" or "assembly" of a small number of leading war wizards for the "chairman" to be a chairman of. It seems a little odd to call someone a "chairman" of an entire institution of a thousand-plus war wizards; the title doesn't really fit any grouping larger than could be comfortably seated around a table together.

This "board" may or may not be the quartet of senior (and aging) War Wizards that Vangerdahast turned the daily operations over to upon becoming "Chairman Emeritus". THO's words (from Ed's notes, as follows)
quote:
Originally posted by THO

Vangey officially became “Chairman Emeritus” when he got too busy to personally direct the daily operations of this College, and turned it over to a quartet of senior (and aging) War Wizards (yes, as “reward jobs”for their declining years).

can be interpreted two ways that I can see. Either (a) this quartet is the "board" that Vangey was chairman of before he assumed the Emeritus title and simply handed daily control to them, or (b) this quartet was assembled and given power when Vangey took the Emeritus title and not before and there is a separate body that is the "board". The way THO worded that as the quartet being "reward jobs" for declining years, my own inclination is that option (b) is the more likely of the two.

So, what do we know?

Well, we know that Vangerdahast really led the War wizards and also had the titles Chairman Emperius and Chairman Emeritus, but the former (real leadership) and latter (official titles) aren't inherently connected.

We know that Caladnei really leads the War Wizards and has the "Mage Royal" or "Royal Magician" titles (which seem to be anonymous and interchangeable), but as far as I've seen possesses neither Chairman title.

We know (at least I think we know) that Court Wizard is a title that is distinct from both "Royal Magician" and either type of Chairman, but I'm not clear at all about how it's distinct.

We know that Laspeera was the "second-in-command" to Vangey and is still the "second-in-command" to Caladnei, but as far as I've seen there are no formal job titles that accrue to the "second-in-command". It appears to be an appointed position of real authority but no formal recognition or title.

We know that there is at least one "board" (this quartet if nothing else) and perhaps two.

What we don't know from Canon is whether anyone at all in the current Caladnei era has the Chairman title, or whether there is currently any "board". Ed, THO, in muddying the waters like this you know that you only prompt further questions!

Putting this together with what I've come up with so far in my War Wizard chapter, right now I'm leaning towards two: an "executive" board (this quartet) that oversees day-to-day operations, and an "administrative or advisory board" (pre-existing the Emeritus title) of senior wizards each responsible for a different function or aspect of War Wizard operations (Purple Dragon attachments, Imperial Navy attachments, investigative teams, border outpost assignments, etc.)

Ed, for the sake of this scribe's sanity, can you provide any clarification?

As Scribe Garen flees cackling madly, Scribe Jerry senses the impending thunderhead of a significant and time-consuming rewrite coming on (pushing delivery date back yet again), and utters a brief primal scream as his cranium distorts and warps into a transdimensional shape reminiscent of what's known on Earth as a Klein bottle...

Edit: Oh, and another question... if the Chairman title is in itself a figurehead title, is there a title for the person who really runs the War Wizards?

Edited by - Jerryd on 05 Jan 2005 02:37:03
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Garen Thal
Master of Realmslore

USA
1081 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  03:09:23  Show Profile  Visit Garen Thal's Homepage Send Garen Thal a Private Message
To very briefly explain the various roles possessed by Vangerdahast (inherited by Caladnei), I'll detail how things work, to the best of my knowledge, understanding, and conversations with Ed:

There is Mage Royal, who is simply and only the Royal Magician, Lord High Wizard, and other divers titles that acts as personal wizard to the king.

Second there is the Court Wizard, who chairs meetings of the Council of Mages, approves new members to that body, and delivers its recommendations to the Crown.

Next, there is the commander of the War Wizards, who serves as the ultimate authority and top of the hierarchy in the field. Earlier in Cormyr's history, this post was known as High Castellan, but since the treachery of Luthax (see Cormyr: A Novel), the commander of the War Wizards has also and only been the Mage Royal.

Last, there is the Chairman of the College of War Wizards. The College of War Wizards is not a school or "college" in the modern sense, but the group of senior War Wizards--and, yes, a few alarphons--that confers membership in that organization; the college is the "board" of which Vangerdahast was chair. The College of War Wizards is extremely secretive (even more than the larger War Wizards group), and their membership is not entirely public. They are part admissions board, part internal affairs, and part something else entirely. The Chairman directs meetings of the College, and reports any decisions it makes to the commander of the War Wizards (who would then report anything important to the Royal Magician; conveniently, all are one in the same).

The muddling of all these posts is part of why Vangey grew so tired so quickly: he created a massive, multi-branched bureaucray, with himself as the key link between them. Thus, Laspeera took over some of the duties of Court Wizard from time to time (one assumes she continues to do so), and Caladnei may indeed be searching for a permanent official to fill one or more of these roles. Time alone will tell.
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Jerryd
Seeker

USA
33 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  04:36:17  Show Profile  Visit Jerryd's Homepage Send Jerryd a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Garen Thal
High Castellan, but since the treachery of Luthax (see Cormyr: A Novel), the commander of the War Wizards has also and only been the Mage Royal.

I took this into account and had written up the abolition of the High Castellan post myself.
quote:
Originally posted by Garen Thal
Last, there is the Chairman of the College of War Wizards. The College of War Wizards is not a school or "college" in the modern sense, but the group of senior War Wizards--and, yes, a few alarphons--that confers membership in that organization; the college is the "board" of which Vangerdahast was chair. The College of War Wizards is extremely secretive (even more than the larger War Wizards group), and their membership is not entirely public. They are part admissions board, part internal affairs, and part something else entirely. The Chairman directs meetings of the College, and reports any decisions it makes to the commander of the War Wizards (who would then report anything important to the Royal Magician; conveniently, all are one in the same).

Yes, the "Chairman of the College of War Wizards" also known as the Chairman Emperius or Emeritus. I already knew that the College of War Wizards is not a school in the modern sense, but what I had always figured was that the "College of War Wizards" was the entire body of all war wizards; that is, the "College of War Wizards" was the name of the entire institution of War Wizards. I had already written up that the entire body of all war wizards is secretive to start with; outsiders can identify many of them by the robes they wear, fear the power they have, and know little to nothing more than that about the details of how they're organized or how they work. What you are calling the "College of War Wizards", though, is sorta-kinda what I had envisioned as just the "administrative or advisory board".

Jerry Davis
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Ulrik Wolfsbane
Seeker

New Zealand
27 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  05:58:04  Show Profile  Visit Ulrik Wolfsbane's Homepage  Click to see Ulrik Wolfsbane's MSN Messenger address Send Ulrik Wolfsbane a Private Message
Oh this one is a question for Ed if he or Elminster come nosing around in this dark corner of Candlekeep. What are the inspirations for the Uthgardt? Given their black hair and blue eyes I would suspect R.E Howard's Cimmerians, but is there more? Cimmerian culture, what little of it Howard described, seemed fairly Celtic in flavour, whereas Uthgardt, in their current incarnation at least, seem more like the Scandinavian Illuskans. Did you intend them to be friends or foes of your adventuring bands, or a more unpredictable force, likely to heal as to harm? Please refer to All Forums/Realmslore/Realms Events/The Uthgardt if you'd like to see where this came from.

Oh yeah, while I'm asking these things, do they have ginger beer in the realms, and where does all the lamp oil come from (in the North at least. I've never heard of oil wells so do they use tallow or flammable sap or something else)? There, I'm done. Thanks!

Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!
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Beowulf
Learned Scribe

Canada
322 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  06:28:45  Show Profile  Visit Beowulf's Homepage Send Beowulf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane

Oh this one is a question for Ed if he or Elminster come nosing around in this dark corner of Candlekeep. What are the inspirations for the Uthgardt? Given their black hair and blue eyes I would suspect R.E Howard's Cimmerians, but is there more? Cimmerian culture, what little of it Howard described, seemed fairly Celtic in flavour, whereas Uthgardt, in their current incarnation at least, seem more like the Scandinavian Illuskans.



The name and the placement of the tribes would suggest something Teutonic -- Utgard is a Norse-Teutonic word meaning "outside" -- possibly inspired by the migrating German tribes of the early/cusp Teutonic Iron Age (200 BCE to 200 CE).

The Romans often confused these early Teutonic tribes with the Celtic. And not without good cause.

There would probably be a few influences all wrapped up in there.


"Ill tempered the wretch, who laughs at everyone. He cannot recognize, as he should, that he is not without faults." the High One, Poetic Edda
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Ulrik Wolfsbane
Seeker

New Zealand
27 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  06:42:46  Show Profile  Visit Ulrik Wolfsbane's Homepage  Click to see Ulrik Wolfsbane's MSN Messenger address Send Ulrik Wolfsbane a Private Message
Cheers Beowulf!

'One of Hygelac's thanes, Beowulf by name,
renowned among the Geats for his great bravery,
heard in his own country of Grendel's crimes;
he was the strongest man alive,
princely and powerful.'

Do you match up?

Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!
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RevJest
Learned Scribe

USA
115 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  09:21:47  Show Profile  Visit RevJest's Homepage Send RevJest a Private Message
The Hooded One,

Yet another question for Ed.

Ed,

Since THO just mentioned your novel "Silverfall", here are a few Silverfall/Eilistraee related question.

First, are the Drow who worship in Ardeep residents of the Promenade? Or, do they live in Ardeep?

Second, why are the Drow of Ardeep so seemingly hostile towards humans? Their behavior seems out of place to me, considering the creed of their goddess.

- S
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Ulrik Wolfsbane
Seeker

New Zealand
27 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  10:00:29  Show Profile  Visit Ulrik Wolfsbane's Homepage  Click to see Ulrik Wolfsbane's MSN Messenger address Send Ulrik Wolfsbane a Private Message
Simontrinity, what prompted you to ask this question? What sources have you looked at/not looked at? Ed did write at some length about Ardeep forest in Dragon #270, and in his 'The New Adventures of Volo' therein he said some few things about the Drow of Ardeep. They ARE led, in worship, on occasion by Qilue. I don't think this means that they are from the Promenade. The Promenade is very rare for a temple of Elistraee in that it is underground and that it's priestesses don't seek out the light of the moon to worship her. They worship in the cavern of song instead. I can't remember if 'Skullport' by Steven Schend has anything on the Promenade, the information I use is from the original Dragon magazine article by Steve and Ed. I can't remember what number, sorry. I suppose they could use portals to travel to Ardeep to worship, but I would put my money on the Ardeep drow being a separate group. As for their viciousness in defending the Dancing Dell? Well, I'm sure being a drow on the surface would lead to an extraordinary amount of anxiety about the intent of strangers, which may well lead to unprovoked attacks. Oh, enough of my speculation, lets hear what Ed has to say...

Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!

Edited by - Ulrik Wolfsbane on 05 Jan 2005 10:06:01
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SiriusBlack
Great Reader

USA
5517 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  14:22:33  Show Profile  Visit SiriusBlack's Homepage Send SiriusBlack a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane
the information I use is from the original Dragon magazine article by Steve and Ed. I can't remember what number, sorry.



Dragon #176 had "If You Need Help -- Ask the Drow!"

by Greenwood & Schend
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Beowulf
Learned Scribe

Canada
322 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  16:41:52  Show Profile  Visit Beowulf's Homepage Send Beowulf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane

Cheers Beowulf!

'One of Hygelac's thanes, Beowulf by name,
renowned among the Geats for his great bravery,
heard in his own country of Grendel's crimes;
he was the strongest man alive,
princely and powerful.'

Do you match up?



Never had much of a problem with boldness or the (other) aetheling thews, ie. "princeliness".

Power? Nope. Strong? For a kraki, yep, definitely. Strongest? Not even.

"Ill tempered the wretch, who laughs at everyone. He cannot recognize, as he should, that he is not without faults." the High One, Poetic Edda
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  19:43:52  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
Hi Ed,

I have a question about Serpent Kingdoms. On page 55 in the creator races colored box of text the plane of Limbo is mentioned. However the new planes, that are in the FRCS and the Player's Guide to Faerun, this plane doesn't exist. So this has caused confusion with a few of us on the boards, the mailing list, and other places.

Now with that in mind does Limbo exist as a seperate plane in FR's Tree now or it is a plane that has falling into decay and gone away like a few of the other planes from the dead deities? Or did it split apart and form into the Supreme Throne with the rise of Cyric?

The confusion mostly lies because of the slaadi. The Player's Guide says they live in the Supreme Throne while Serpent Kingdoms says they fled to Limbo.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium

Edited by - Kuje on 05 Jan 2005 23:55:19
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
29992 Posts

Posted - 05 Jan 2005 :  23:47:39  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by SiriusBlack

quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane
the information I use is from the original Dragon magazine article by Steve and Ed. I can't remember what number, sorry.



Dragon #176 had "If You Need Help -- Ask the Drow!"

by Greenwood & Schend



That's one of the few Dragon articles that I took the time to copy over to Word...

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Ulrik Wolfsbane
Seeker

New Zealand
27 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  00:24:38  Show Profile  Visit Ulrik Wolfsbane's Homepage  Click to see Ulrik Wolfsbane's MSN Messenger address Send Ulrik Wolfsbane a Private Message
Cheers Rupert! That article RAWKS! I still refer to it often. Is there anything in 'Skullport' on the Promenade?

Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  01:41:51  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Ed’s reply to Capn Charlie about annual festivals and holidays concludes, thus:

Marpenoth 7 Stoneshar
On this day, ceremonial building is begun. It’s seen as the best day of the year for the construction of a building to begin (with the digging out of cellars and the laying of at least one foundation-stone), because such an act is thought to confer the favour of all the gods not just on the place where the act of construction is commenced, but on the building that results.
However, even if no buildings are needed or will be built, prayers are offered to the gods as two stones are placed, one sited in the earth or on bedrock, and the other placed atop the first, in a ritual representing building.
Stoneshar is seen as a good day for beginning business ventures, making deals, signing contracts, and constructing small items (from pots to tools). Temples of Lathander, Gond, and Grumbar charge no fees during Stoneshar, and throw open their doors to all for priests to give advice, render aid, and demonstrate building methods, skills, and tools.
“The gods help those who help themselves” is a saying heard often during Stoneshar, an all-faiths festival in which all priesthoods refrain from punishment and destruction of any sort. There are no executions on Stoneshar, and it is not a day for idleness. Even children at play are encouraged to make things, even if their constructions are merely holes, sandcastles, or crude models: the industry is what’s holy on this day, for by their exertions and the projects they begin, folk attract the favour of all the gods down upon them and where they dwell, until next Stoneshar. Conversely, sloth and laziness risks the displeasure of the gods (and all manner of misfortune, as “Beshaba dances unchained”) on the individuals and their dwelling-place, for the year ahead.
Communal feasts (wherein all participants bring food, in what we modern real-world folk would call “potluck”) are common in most places; in cities, these are often held at local temples or usually-private clubs (and yes, some clubs put on entertainments and ‘dress the place up’ in order to entice gawking visitors into joining, or to enhance their fearsome local reputations).

Uktar 20 Last Sheaf
Regardless of the actual end of harvest (usually at least a tenday or more earlier, though Turmish can be warm far later into the year than latitudes north of, say, the Lake of Dragons), this day of feasting is held in celebration of the year’s bounty. Small gifts (traditionally, handkegs of ale, jars of preserves, and smoked fish and meats) are exchanged among neighbours, and “last letters” are gathered for carriage by ship captains and caravan merchants to points south (most points north are already inaccessible, thanks to coastal ice and inland snows). Many rulers send out clerks, envoys, and heralds to gather the last news, pleas, and requests from remote subjects before winter really closes in. In more mountainous parts of Turmish, hunt are held for stags and other big game; if successful, a second day of feasting follows.

Nightal 11 Howldown
Wolf hunts (and hunts of all other sorts of predators, from owlbears and trolls to brigands and orc bands) are held, with all able-bodied folk (mercenaries and adventurers are expected to take part, too, without thought of payment or gain) gathering into large hunting parties, and local spellcasters aiding in ‘flushing out’ prey. The intent is to eliminate predators who will endanger citizens and their livestock when food grows scarce in the worst depths of the winter.
Regardless of the success of the hunts, the night ends with large bonfires and much drinking and the telling of hunting tales. Elders who were great hunters in their day are toasted, and trophies (claws, horns, teeth, and heads of slain monsters) are distributed to be boiled clean and hung on walls and over mantels.



So saith Ed, who adds his hopes that Capn Charlie will enjoy these, as we all embark on another year of great gaming.
love to all,
THO
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Kentinal
Great Reader

4276 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  01:50:14  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Ed’s reply to Capn Charlie about annual festivals and holidays concludes, thus:

...

Nightal 11 Howldown
Wolf hunts (and hunts of all other sorts of predators, from owlbears and trolls to brigands and orc bands) are held, with all able-bodied folk (mercenaries and adventurers are expected to take part, too, without thought of payment or gain) gathering into large hunting parties, and local spellcasters aiding in ‘flushing out’ prey. The intent is to eliminate predators who will endanger citizens and their livestock when food grows scarce in the worst depths of the winter.
Regardless of the success of the hunts, the night ends with large bonfires and much drinking and the telling of hunting tales. Elders who were great hunters in their day are toasted, and trophies (claws, horns, teeth, and heads of slain monsters) are distributed to be boiled clean and hung on walls and over mantels.





This one appears known though not on all four points, how many hunts are there in the Realms?
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
29992 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  02:01:44  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane

Cheers Rupert! That article RAWKS! I still refer to it often. Is there anything in 'Skullport' on the Promenade?



No, it appears that the article mentioned above is the best source of info on the Promenade. I just scanned over the other articles I had lifted from Dragon (the ones that pertained to Undermountain, that is), and none of them offered any additional info on the Promenade. Nor did the Skullport supplement of the same name give any info on the Promenade.

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Kentinal
Great Reader

4276 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  02:51:48  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Ulrik Wolfsbane

Cheers Rupert! That article RAWKS! I still refer to it often. Is there anything in 'Skullport' on the Promenade?



No, it appears that the article mentioned above is the best source of info on the Promenade. I just scanned over the other articles I had lifted from Dragon (the ones that pertained to Undermountain, that is), and none of them offered any additional info on the Promenade. Nor did the Skullport supplement of the same name give any info on the Promenade.



That is the one that describes the four sections of the Promenade?

As you might be able to tell I can not lay my hands on the article at this time.
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SirUrza
Master of Realmslore

USA
1280 Posts

Posted - 06 Jan 2005 :  06:15:05  Show Profile  Send SirUrza an AOL message  Send SirUrza an ICQ Message Send SirUrza a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

and a Silverfall (the novel, finally in print as a mass market paperback) “character profile,” a little bit of whimsical fun fiction by Ed that made me laugh at loud:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=books/fr/silverfallcp



Now that was truely an enjoyable read, suddenly, I have an urge to read a certain Harper novel. :)

"Evil prevails when good men fail to act."
The original and unapologetic Arilyn, Aribeth, Seoni Fanboy.
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ShayneT
Acolyte

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Posted - 07 Jan 2005 :  01:22:36  Show Profile  Visit ShayneT's Homepage Send ShayneT a Private Message
I have a question for Ed.

There have been reports in numerous sources of huge sums of money begin transferred during business dealings- two million gold pieces in Amn for the purchase of a shipload of silks, the purchase of the throne of Estagun in 1026 Dr by a merchant for "almost a million gold pieces" worth in diamonds, and in one Realms novel, there is mention of Mirt the moneylender making a ten million gold piece loan to a crime lord, when Tymora's luck caused his lottery system to go awry.

Just how much money does the average noble have control of anyway? I realize that most businessmen have most of their assets invested in property and businesses rather than easily carried wealth. How much wealth does someone have to have to impress the average waterdhavian?
Is a thousand thousand coins considered a huge sum?

One of the d20 modern books suggests that gold pieces are worth approximately $20. It occurs to me that the wealthiest businessman in Faerun might then be worth around 50 million gold. This would put him in the same league as a Rockefeller. I doubt it would be easy to own amounts much larger than that due to transportation and communications difficulties. Administrative costs of a business empire alone would eat up profits, along with the monsters, bandits, thieves and unscrupulous competing businesses who are out to steal your latest caravan load of silks.

Does that sound reasonable? Kings might have more money, but for a private individual, how much wealth makes him considered a financial power in the realms?
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

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Posted - 07 Jan 2005 :  02:09:51  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Kentinal, herewith Ed of the Greenwood makes reply to your fortified manors queries:



Long before the formal idea of what has become the Silver Marches was first raised, Everlund saw the wisdom of nestling under the protection of Silverymoon, and so positioned itself in all ways as a friend and ally. Having rooted inhabitants dwelling on both sides of the Rauvin was seen as wise strategy by the rulers of both cities, and patrolling the lands between them so as to forge a (relatively) ‘safe’ slice of the wilderlands of the North as a welcome goal.
If folk settle in this forested region of gently rolling hills and carve out small farms or build dwellings (necessarily fortified for protection against owlbears, brigands, and wandering foraging bands of goblins, orcs, and bugbears), that’s seen as highly desirable to further ‘anchor’ the region.
Most such landowners build in the lands between Silverymoon and Everlund so as to live in seclusion (they may be wizards wanting solitude for study, various folk who want privacy because they don’t adhere to comfortable societal norms or fit into the ‘sort of folk accepted by most others’ [such as lycanthropes, drow, members of various cults, and so on]), but within reach of the services, goods, and customers or sources of recruits offered by the generally tolerant, ‘good’ folk of Everlund and Silverymoon. Few of these landowners (who are known locally as “forestholders”) are stupid enough to dispute the authority of the armed patrols sent out by either Silverymoon or Everlund.
In short, yes, the forestholders are independent of the authority of either city, but they see the value of being able to rely on the patrols to ‘keep down’ the perils outside their walls, and when REAL trouble knocks at their gates (orc hordes, fell armies on the march; that sort of thing), the opportunity to run to the protection of walled Silverymoon, or the numbers afforded by the population of Everlund, so as to be able to reach Silverymoon alive or take barge down the Rauvin and out of the area.
As a result, it’s rare indeed for any forestholder to argue with a patrol in any way, providing water, food, shelter and stabling at short notice, and for low fees - - but in return, the patrols always DO pay for what they need, treat the forestholders with polite respect, and even volunteer their muscle for timber-lifting (for fence and building repairs, extrication of mired wagons, and so on).
Most of these fortified manors are little more than a stables, a pantry/granary, a springhouse (most of them are sited where springs of drinkable water come to the surface, in this area of many such springs), a kitchen garden, a carriage house or workshed, and a dwelling [however small or large and elaborate - - and most start small, and are added to by wings and towers, as needs dictate over the passing years]. Building stone is plentiful and easily gathered, and most buildings are of stone, with roofs of wood and wood shingles, and encircling walls of a timber palisade reinforced by courses of stone blocks on the inside, and steep banks of earth on the outside (planted with creepers to hold the soil). Over the seasons, as the palisade rots, the place where it has been is “fired” [small fires built in the cavities] to bake the mud on one side, and the cement-like mortar of the stone walls on the other side, hard - - and the cavities are then filled in with stone rubble and refuse.
Most holds can’t support themselves unless growing conditions can be aided with spells (they haven’t the space and enough days of warmth to grow enough vegetables to feed many mouths). Few have enough long-term residents to gather enough wild food, or do enough hunting, to keep tables spread throughout an entire year (especially the long, overly harsh winters, which has led to some of the more formidable forestholders abandoning their holds every fall for warmer dwellings in Tethyr and parts south, and returning in spring to, if necessary, re-conquer their own holds from whoever’s moved in during the cold months).
Though such holdings tend to cluster together along trails (especially close to Everlund), there are no hamlets: the authorities in both Everlund and Silverymoon discourage such forming, because they know such places will inevitably spring up around guardposts established by their patrols - - making the guardposts more inviting targets and endangering the patrols because potential attackers will be able to dwell in, or hide among, the buildings, paddocks, sheds, and side-alleys that are a part of every settlement.
Kentinal, I’m guessing you’re seeing this region of the Realms a little too much like real-world Eruope, where no matter how “wild” the terrain is, there’s always a defined border and someone claiming the lands on both sides of it.
Even in the most-heavily-settled part of the inland Sword Coast North that we’re discussing, we have a frontier situation where boundaries are ill-defined and even the extent of patrolled areas change with seasons, resources, and perceived danger. True authority tends to end at about the point of your drawn sword, if you see what I mean. In real-world terms, this is SOMEWHAT like the Hollywood (i.e. endless) version of the American ‘Wild West,’ only a lot colder and so more dictated by sheer survival needs.
However, your question about borders elsewhere in the Realms is a good one. There are “a number of small, private fortified manor houses that serve as rather exclusive inns (often patronized by caravan companies, adventuring bands, and parties of envoys),” to use my own earlier words, in easternmost Amn and Tethyr, northernmost Sembia, in the southeasternmost Tashalar, throughout the Border Kingdoms, and around Hillsfar - - not to mention many other areas I haven’t really thought about in any detail.
Prime adventuring country, in other words. Go for it! :}



So saith Ed. Whose last few sentences remind me of the Ghost Holds nigh Battledale, wherein we Knights have spent many a hair-raising day. An isolated hold would be a great setting for a Clue-style murder mystery, too.
love to all,
THO
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Kentinal
Great Reader

4276 Posts

Posted - 07 Jan 2005 :  03:11:23  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Kentinal, herewith Ed of the Greenwood makes reply to your fortified manors queries:




I thank for the reply, in part much as I expected.

quote:


Though such holdings tend to cluster together along trails (especially close to Everlund), there are no hamlets: the authorities in both Everlund and Silverymoon discourage such forming, because they know such places will inevitably spring up around guardposts established by their patrols - - making the guardposts more inviting targets and endangering the patrols because potential attackers will be able to dwell in, or hide among, the buildings, paddocks, sheds, and side-alleys that are a part of every settlement.
(/quote]

As expected to be permitted.

quote:

Kentinal, I’m guessing you’re seeing this region of the Realms a little too much like real-world Eruope, where no matter how “wild” the terrain is, there’s always a defined border and someone claiming the lands on both sides of it.



I was not looking for artificial borders as such, though did wonder about nactrual borders. Rivers, ranges and the like. I do understand the ill defined borders well.

[quote]

However, your question about borders elsewhere in the Realms is a good one. There are “a number of small, private fortified manor houses that serve as rather exclusive inns (often patronized by caravan companies, adventuring bands, and parties of envoys),” to use my own earlier words, in easternmost Amn and Tethyr, northernmost Sembia, in the southeasternmost Tashalar, throughout the Border Kingdoms, and around Hillsfar - - not to mention many other areas I haven’t really thought about in any detail.
Prime adventuring country, in other words. Go for it! :}



I do thank you for a detailed reply. Now to think up harder questions. Blessings be with you and the Hooded one that provides your words.


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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 07 Jan 2005 :  22:12:03  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message
A question for Ed

The PGTF assigned regions to the FR races including Aasimars and Tieflings, it did not however include regions for the Chaond and Zenythri (The Chaos and Law equivlents to Aasimars an Tieflings). We know that Chaond at the very least are present in the FR (Rich Baker used one in his Dungeon module Prison of the Flamebringer)

Have the Lawful and Chaos outsiders had an impact on Faeruns history and if so where?

Thanks in advance


“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks

Edited by - Dargoth on 07 Jan 2005 22:27:30
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