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Baltas
Senior Scribe

Poland
669 Posts

Posted - 08 Nov 2019 :  13:53:35  Show Profile Send Baltas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Ed,

It's not 100% Realmslore, but I wonder, are Batna and Lilith the same she-devil, under two names and forms? (With Batna somehow surviving her apparent oblideration?) All I found about the real life Batna, is that is her name is another name for Lilith, similarly how Beherit is the Syraic name for Satan, seeing Beherit is also named Lucifer. And seeing both are connected to Malbolge.

The Dragon #76 article also wrote Lilith is "feels largely powerless in the current regime", possibly suggesting she once held more power.

Edited by - Baltas on 08 Nov 2019 22:26:17
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Turtleking
Acolyte

Finland
2 Posts

Posted - 13 Nov 2019 :  00:12:54  Show Profile Send Turtleking a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Greetings oh mighty sage.

This humble acolyte is interested in the current (5th edition) state of Cormyr nobility. More closely: any ideas on the history and current political standing of house Alsevir?
Forgotten Realms wiki has info, perhaps not much but enough for me to get a start. I was just interested in opinions and ideas on this matter since references in wiki are 4 years old.
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CorellonsDevout
Great Reader

USA
2402 Posts

Posted - 13 Nov 2019 :  01:20:35  Show Profile  Send CorellonsDevout an AOL message Send CorellonsDevout a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Turtleking

Greetings oh mighty sage.

This humble acolyte is interested in the current (5th edition) state of Cormyr nobility. More closely: any ideas on the history and current political standing of house Alsevir?
Forgotten Realms wiki has info, perhaps not much but enough for me to get a start. I was just interested in opinions and ideas on this matter since references in wiki are 4 years old.



The Brimstone Angels series by ERIN m Evans starts in 4e era, but carries over into 5e (book 3, The Adversary is part of the Sundering series as well, and the next books are all 5e. Fire in the Blood and Ashes of the Tyrant in particular have scenes in and info on 5e Cormyr.

Sweet water and light laughter
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althen artren
Senior Scribe

USA
779 Posts

Posted - 26 Nov 2019 :  18:05:15  Show Profile Send althen artren a Private Message  Reply with Quote
All,

I returning to the Realms after a long hiatus and would to map out some adventuring locations. Can info be provided on the Keening Woods in Cormanthor, the Realm of Wailing Fog in between the Hullack Forest and the Thunderpeaks (specifically, are there elven ruins within the Realm?), and the Starym Properties in the Hullack Forest?
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Aureus
Learned Scribe

Luxembourg
124 Posts

Posted - 29 Nov 2019 :  23:45:02  Show Profile  Send Aureus an ICQ Message Send Aureus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
What is a typical burial mound arrangement for the elves of Cormanthyr? (If they had burial mounds)

My players are going into the Cormanthor forest soon and I would like to be consistent with the lore^^

That is not the weirdest thing that happened to me
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AJA
Senior Scribe

USA
427 Posts

Posted - 07 Dec 2019 :  00:29:22  Show Profile Send AJA a Private Message  Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Ed Greenwood, @TheEdVerse, 06 Dec 2019
Volo's true father was a (still secret! NDA!!) Waterdhavian noble, who needed a blood heir but had a barren wife he loved and didn't want to set aside.


Boy, I hope his true father wasn't a Silmerhelve, Ed, otherwise that thing with Ravithara Silmerhelve got all "Greek tragedy" in a hurry


AJA
YAFRP
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JEThetford
Seeker

USA
42 Posts

Posted - 14 Dec 2019 :  15:27:06  Show Profile  Visit JEThetford's Homepage  Send JEThetford an AOL message  Send JEThetford a Yahoo! Message Send JEThetford a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by althen artren

All,

I returning to the Realms after a long hiatus and would to map out some adventuring locations. Can info be provided on the Keening Woods in Cormanthor, the Realm of Wailing Fog in between the Hullack Forest and the Thunderpeaks (specifically, are there elven ruins within the Realm?), and the Starym Properties in the Hullack Forest?


Well Met! I direct you to the Mages and Sages Podcast/Interviews with Ed Greenwood and many of the people whom built the Realms. It can be found on YouTube under Mages and Sages Interview with the Old Mage. We are actually doing another Interview tonight with Steven Schend so go and have a listen as I know many of your questions have been answered on the Podcast!

Sweet water and light laughter be yours!

The only good Drow, is a dead Drow.

Aaomas Balkrim, Drow Hunter
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Qilintha
Seeker

41 Posts

Posted - 18 Feb 2020 :  00:21:13  Show Profile Send Qilintha a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sadly I don't use twitter and I have a question for Ed, it's still ok to post it here? Hoping to not hit the dreaded NDA

Are there any fiendish Chosen of Mystra?
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Aureus
Learned Scribe

Luxembourg
124 Posts

Posted - 25 Feb 2020 :  14:25:59  Show Profile  Send Aureus an ICQ Message Send Aureus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Dear The Hooded One,

What style(s) of fashion is fashionable in Waterdeep? Working/middle/upper class would be greatly appreciated :)

That is not the weirdest thing that happened to me
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
33193 Posts

Posted - 25 Feb 2020 :  15:54:57  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Aureus

Dear The Hooded One,

What style(s) of fashion is fashionable in Waterdeep? Working/middle/upper class would be greatly appreciated :)



What is the era and season? Winter wear in 1375 is going to be different from summer wear in 1490.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
33193 Posts

Posted - 25 Feb 2020 :  15:54:59  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Aureus

Dear The Hooded One,

What style(s) of fashion is fashionable in Waterdeep? Working/middle/upper class would be greatly appreciated :)



What is the era and season? Winter wear in 1375 is going to be different from summer wear in 1490.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Editor and scribe for The Candlekeep Compendium

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
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AJA
Senior Scribe

USA
427 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2020 :  01:21:46  Show Profile Send AJA a Private Message  Reply with Quote

I think Wooly's right, in that your question would be easier (or quicker) to answer if narrowed down a bit in scope. In the meantime, here are two of Ed's previous Candlekeep replies which may be of some relevance:

quote:
Originally posted on Nov 16 2006
In Waterdeep, many nobles use fashion to divide themselves from commoners (and younger or ‘black sheep’ nobles use fashion to rebel or make a statement), whereas the wealthiest wannabe-noble merchants try to dress like the nobles, and most guildmasters and wealthy DON’T-wannabe-noble merchants adopt expensive but clearly different fashions, to show they’re “as good as, or better than nobles, and certainly don’t want to be nobles or mistaken for nobles.”

Right. Stage set. Now, on to specifics for females. The impression one is trying to impart is of course paramount (REALLY rich, or beyond-caring-about-coin rich, or conservative, or I’m an adventurer above all this “society” nonsense, or I’m the special guest wanting to stand out or surpass everyone, or I belong here) is usually the dominant factor in deciding what to wear.

The cheapest way to dress is the conservative look: basic black gown with high collar and/or plunge front, matching sash and boots, and a few pieces of small, tasteful jewelry (moonstone or pearl earrings and perhaps a pendant and/or finger ring). Some adventurers have, or can borrow, or can buy secondhand, all of these very cheaply. (This is the Realms equivalent of the “little black dress.”) Truly wealthy nobles have their own seamstresses, and go to the best designers, to achieve the same look for as much as 4,000 gp (plus the cost of the jewels). Most women wealthy enough to “buy new, in a hurry” can put together the same look, jewelry included, for 150 gp (50 gp/boots, 80 or so for an off-the-peg gown and sash, and the rest for jewels), IF they’re a fairly standard size (if your hips are literally four feet across, NOTHING off the peg is ever going to fit you). Almost all “new” clothiers in either city are used to doing small on-the-spot alterations to make a sale.

Someone shopping a secondhand shop, who gets lucky on finding something unsoiled, untorn, and more or less their size, who can touch up scuffed boots and wash everything, could put together the same ensemble for about 65 gp (25 gp/boots, 20 or less for the gown, and 20 gp for earrings).

The conservative look is never “out of fashion” except among a wild revelry gathering of the rebellious young, and even there it can be “dressed down” by exchanging the black sash for a flame-orange one, pinning the gown (to the inside of the sash) half-open to expose skin or a racy chemise (lace-trimmed white silk for classy look, almost anything to present other images) and jewelry (such as nipple clamps with tassels, and a gem set in the navel).

MOST well-to-do shopkeeper’s wives in both cities have the following:
* The “black look” discussed above, plus a matching cape and cap (for funerals, solemn ceremonies, and “not sure what to wear but sure don’t want to offend” feasts and meetings with nobles or social superiors).
* At least three evening gowns (ankle length), of varying degrees of daring (plunge front and/or back, cutouts, or none) and various hues, usually at least one bright red. These are for guild dinners, meals and moots with social equals (and the more of these latter they attend, the more often they’ll buy new gowns to add into the mix, so those who see them often will know they’re wealthy enough to buy a gown whenever the mood strikes them). Endless accessories (hats, purses, belts, baldrics, garters, chemises, chathra [ = petticoats; the Realms term implies trimmed so as to be partially seen], furs [usually “wraps” that are draped artistically], underthings [see Page 21 of my 2004 replies, here at Candlekeep] and jewels) are mixed and swapped with these to create different looks.
* A wild costume, or two, for costume balls and really daring revelry (masks are ALWAYS a feature of these, but they range from piratical garb to strap-on gossamer silk “fairy wings” to strap-on furry or scaled serpentine tails, and so on; by daring revelry I mean feasts and other gatherings where sexual activity or at least physical flirtation is expected; Waterdhavian matrons of a certain age often refer to these as “one of my plough-me-please outfits”).
* At least one VERY expensive and dramatic gown by a famous local designer, that will pass for being “in fashion” with the latest tastes. These can be almost anything, will come with full matching accessories (e.g. face-veils and/or half-cloaks), and tend to get “put away” in a wardrobe for a decade until they’re in fashion again. “Dramatic” is the key word here: many of these gowns have shoulder fins, daring cutouts, and impractical trimmings.

The northernmost four wards of Waterdeep bristle with shops selling overpriced clothing and footwear; personally-designed gowns (involving a “name” designer and usually many “fittings” [fitting sessions where the wearer is measured, muslin mockups and later the gowns themselves are pinned on to them, cut, and re-pinned]) can easily cost 6,000 gp each for a really rich noble and 2,000 for someone wealthy (many designers set their prices according to a client’s ability to pay, but are utterly uninterested in taking on poor clients unless they fall in love with them or are discharging a debt). Most “good” shops sell and alter close copies of the less outrageous designer gowns, and “classic” garments, for 400 gp up to 1,200 gp. Off-the-peg garments at the “less glittering shops” can often serve very well, and can be had for 80 gp up to 600 gp at most, with the majority of gowns running around 100 gp.

One recurring “fashion fallback” is to wear a simple, cheap gown, and a very “showy” trimmed slip or chemise (made for someone larger) OVER it, with a sash or belt of contrasting hue to “bind the whole look together.” Such showy undergarments cost a maximum of about 80 gp (unless custom-made), and even the classiest sash or belt is seldom more than 40 gp.

A bard may well want clothing she can most elegantly perform in; a rogue (or for that matter, all three characters, depending on what adventures they intend to get up to) often wants a dark gown that can be shed swiftly and easily, and wadded up and stuffed somewhere without being lastingly wrinkled or harmed; and a sorceress may (or may not!) want an outfit that looks mystical and darkly impressive.

quote:
Originally posted on Sep 16 2008
“in Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate, circa 1374 DR, what's the "hottest" fashion in lady's hats or hairdos, if any?”

The hottest fashion in feminine hair fashion is long, free-flowing hair down the back of the head and the shoulders and back below that, that is held “up” just in front of the crown of the scalp with an elaborate hair-comb (with upward-projecting spikes, so it looks like a tiara projecting up through the hair) that ends, on the back of the head, with a decorative weave of wires (think elaborate “open” knots akin to real-world Celtic knotwork) that gathers the “fall” of hair through a large defined ‘tube’ or oval of wire. So the fall of hair is really a gigantic ponytail, spread out wide by the knots.
Those who lack long hair of their own buy woven wigs of washed, combed, sorted, and dyed real hair, originally belonging to multiple others, that attach with hooks and clips to this back-of-the-head knotwork of the hair-comb (bald individuals wear chinstrap thin flesh-hued cords that hold the comb to their scalps).
This hairdo is known as “the ar-fall.”

The most fashionable headgear (for wearing over hair) is a prowed, peaked soft leather cap (think Hollywood Robin-Hood caps), fashioned to be very long and thin, that is attached to the hair-comb so it won’t fall off easily AND to keep it raked at an angle to one side of the head, and always “prow low in front, rear up at back.” Such caps always sport at least two large, fluffy feathers (from peacocks or other birds with large, colorful tailfeathers or flight feathers), one of each side of the cap. That’s the minimum; fops and the haughty may wear caps with nine or more feathers stuffed in, though all of them will be raked back (plumes to the rear). Caps of this sort are even appearing that have gauze-work woven among the feathers to support many tiny dangling “sparkle” faceted gemstones.
Such caps are formally known as “fancy-mes” but have now become more commonly known as “dees” (corruption through usages).

If Waterdhavian fashion patterns hold true, the hairdo and the cap will enjoy about the same period of wide popularity: two seasons. Thereafter, they will be used by those who want to signal they are NOT “irresponsible younglings” for another two seasons, and then retained by a few individuals for decades.



AJA
YAFRP
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Aureus
Learned Scribe

Luxembourg
124 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2020 :  23:47:19  Show Profile  Send Aureus an ICQ Message Send Aureus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Aureus

Dear The Hooded One,

What style(s) of fashion is fashionable in Waterdeep? Working/middle/upper class would be greatly appreciated :)



What is the era and season? Winter wear in 1375 is going to be different from summer wear in 1490.



Oh Wooly, what makes you think that I don't want to know about all their fashions in all time periods?^^

What I am really looking for is knowledge on how my lady character can be stylishly dressed while fitting in and yet standing out enough without looking like a (male) peacock or a person in mourning. :)



quote:
Originally posted by AJA


I think Wooly's right, in that your question would be easier (or quicker) to answer if narrowed down a bit in scope. In the meantime, here are two of Ed's previous Candlekeep replies which may be of some relevance:

quote:
Originally posted on Nov 16 2006
In Waterdeep, many nobles use fashion to divide themselves from commoners (and younger or ‘black sheep’ nobles use fashion to rebel or make a statement), whereas the wealthiest wannabe-noble merchants try to dress like the nobles, and most guildmasters and wealthy DON’T-wannabe-noble merchants adopt expensive but clearly different fashions, to show they’re “as good as, or better than nobles, and certainly don’t want to be nobles or mistaken for nobles.”

Right. Stage set. Now, on to specifics for females. The impression one is trying to impart is of course paramount (REALLY rich, or beyond-caring-about-coin rich, or conservative, or I’m an adventurer above all this “society” nonsense, or I’m the special guest wanting to stand out or surpass everyone, or I belong here) is usually the dominant factor in deciding what to wear.

The cheapest way to dress is the conservative look: basic black gown with high collar and/or plunge front, matching sash and boots, and a few pieces of small, tasteful jewelry (moonstone or pearl earrings and perhaps a pendant and/or finger ring). Some adventurers have, or can borrow, or can buy secondhand, all of these very cheaply. (This is the Realms equivalent of the “little black dress.”) Truly wealthy nobles have their own seamstresses, and go to the best designers, to achieve the same look for as much as 4,000 gp (plus the cost of the jewels). Most women wealthy enough to “buy new, in a hurry” can put together the same look, jewelry included, for 150 gp (50 gp/boots, 80 or so for an off-the-peg gown and sash, and the rest for jewels), IF they’re a fairly standard size (if your hips are literally four feet across, NOTHING off the peg is ever going to fit you). Almost all “new” clothiers in either city are used to doing small on-the-spot alterations to make a sale.

Someone shopping a secondhand shop, who gets lucky on finding something unsoiled, untorn, and more or less their size, who can touch up scuffed boots and wash everything, could put together the same ensemble for about 65 gp (25 gp/boots, 20 or less for the gown, and 20 gp for earrings).

The conservative look is never “out of fashion” except among a wild revelry gathering of the rebellious young, and even there it can be “dressed down” by exchanging the black sash for a flame-orange one, pinning the gown (to the inside of the sash) half-open to expose skin or a racy chemise (lace-trimmed white silk for classy look, almost anything to present other images) and jewelry (such as nipple clamps with tassels, and a gem set in the navel).

MOST well-to-do shopkeeper’s wives in both cities have the following:
* The “black look” discussed above, plus a matching cape and cap (for funerals, solemn ceremonies, and “not sure what to wear but sure don’t want to offend” feasts and meetings with nobles or social superiors).
* At least three evening gowns (ankle length), of varying degrees of daring (plunge front and/or back, cutouts, or none) and various hues, usually at least one bright red. These are for guild dinners, meals and moots with social equals (and the more of these latter they attend, the more often they’ll buy new gowns to add into the mix, so those who see them often will know they’re wealthy enough to buy a gown whenever the mood strikes them). Endless accessories (hats, purses, belts, baldrics, garters, chemises, chathra [ = petticoats; the Realms term implies trimmed so as to be partially seen], furs [usually “wraps” that are draped artistically], underthings [see Page 21 of my 2004 replies, here at Candlekeep] and jewels) are mixed and swapped with these to create different looks.
* A wild costume, or two, for costume balls and really daring revelry (masks are ALWAYS a feature of these, but they range from piratical garb to strap-on gossamer silk “fairy wings” to strap-on furry or scaled serpentine tails, and so on; by daring revelry I mean feasts and other gatherings where sexual activity or at least physical flirtation is expected; Waterdhavian matrons of a certain age often refer to these as “one of my plough-me-please outfits”).
* At least one VERY expensive and dramatic gown by a famous local designer, that will pass for being “in fashion” with the latest tastes. These can be almost anything, will come with full matching accessories (e.g. face-veils and/or half-cloaks), and tend to get “put away” in a wardrobe for a decade until they’re in fashion again. “Dramatic” is the key word here: many of these gowns have shoulder fins, daring cutouts, and impractical trimmings.

The northernmost four wards of Waterdeep bristle with shops selling overpriced clothing and footwear; personally-designed gowns (involving a “name” designer and usually many “fittings” [fitting sessions where the wearer is measured, muslin mockups and later the gowns themselves are pinned on to them, cut, and re-pinned]) can easily cost 6,000 gp each for a really rich noble and 2,000 for someone wealthy (many designers set their prices according to a client’s ability to pay, but are utterly uninterested in taking on poor clients unless they fall in love with them or are discharging a debt). Most “good” shops sell and alter close copies of the less outrageous designer gowns, and “classic” garments, for 400 gp up to 1,200 gp. Off-the-peg garments at the “less glittering shops” can often serve very well, and can be had for 80 gp up to 600 gp at most, with the majority of gowns running around 100 gp.

One recurring “fashion fallback” is to wear a simple, cheap gown, and a very “showy” trimmed slip or chemise (made for someone larger) OVER it, with a sash or belt of contrasting hue to “bind the whole look together.” Such showy undergarments cost a maximum of about 80 gp (unless custom-made), and even the classiest sash or belt is seldom more than 40 gp.

A bard may well want clothing she can most elegantly perform in; a rogue (or for that matter, all three characters, depending on what adventures they intend to get up to) often wants a dark gown that can be shed swiftly and easily, and wadded up and stuffed somewhere without being lastingly wrinkled or harmed; and a sorceress may (or may not!) want an outfit that looks mystical and darkly impressive.

quote:
Originally posted on Sep 16 2008
“in Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate, circa 1374 DR, what's the "hottest" fashion in lady's hats or hairdos, if any?”

The hottest fashion in feminine hair fashion is long, free-flowing hair down the back of the head and the shoulders and back below that, that is held “up” just in front of the crown of the scalp with an elaborate hair-comb (with upward-projecting spikes, so it looks like a tiara projecting up through the hair) that ends, on the back of the head, with a decorative weave of wires (think elaborate “open” knots akin to real-world Celtic knotwork) that gathers the “fall” of hair through a large defined ‘tube’ or oval of wire. So the fall of hair is really a gigantic ponytail, spread out wide by the knots.
Those who lack long hair of their own buy woven wigs of washed, combed, sorted, and dyed real hair, originally belonging to multiple others, that attach with hooks and clips to this back-of-the-head knotwork of the hair-comb (bald individuals wear chinstrap thin flesh-hued cords that hold the comb to their scalps).
This hairdo is known as “the ar-fall.”

The most fashionable headgear (for wearing over hair) is a prowed, peaked soft leather cap (think Hollywood Robin-Hood caps), fashioned to be very long and thin, that is attached to the hair-comb so it won’t fall off easily AND to keep it raked at an angle to one side of the head, and always “prow low in front, rear up at back.” Such caps always sport at least two large, fluffy feathers (from peacocks or other birds with large, colorful tailfeathers or flight feathers), one of each side of the cap. That’s the minimum; fops and the haughty may wear caps with nine or more feathers stuffed in, though all of them will be raked back (plumes to the rear). Caps of this sort are even appearing that have gauze-work woven among the feathers to support many tiny dangling “sparkle” faceted gemstones.
Such caps are formally known as “fancy-mes” but have now become more commonly known as “dees” (corruption through usages).

If Waterdhavian fashion patterns hold true, the hairdo and the cap will enjoy about the same period of wide popularity: two seasons. Thereafter, they will be used by those who want to signal they are NOT “irresponsible younglings” for another two seasons, and then retained by a few individuals for decades.






Thanks AJA, this helps a lot :)

That is not the weirdest thing that happened to me
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AJA
Senior Scribe

USA
427 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2020 :  03:27:28  Show Profile Send AJA a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally Twittered by Ed Greenwood
Lantan is now a gnome-dominated (with a scattering of humans)

Oh. Oh, Ed.

You could'a done it, Ed. Such a softball question, "Can you offer any information about what might be found on Lantan?" You could'a rid Lantan of the TINKER GNOMEZ menace once and for all. A big 'ol meatball right there over the plate, but instead of Roy Hobbs, it's Casey at the Bat.

Not even a flare, a gorp, a....a groundball with eyes, a dying quail....



Well there is no joy in AJAville, Ed. I can tell you that.




AJA
YAFRP

Edited by - AJA on 01 Mar 2020 03:28:59
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AJA
Senior Scribe

USA
427 Posts

Posted - 01 Mar 2020 :  04:06:28  Show Profile Send AJA a Private Message  Reply with Quote

Ed,

On NOV 27 2019 you Tweeted "road built to link Ordûlin and Archenbridge..." and on FEB 29 2020 you Tweeted "in the cellars of Ordûlin..."

Is Ordûlin actually the correct spelling of Ordulin?



(and is that something already known, because I can't find anything in a cursury glance at my books?)


AJA
YAFRP
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BladeMage
Acolyte

2 Posts

Posted - 22 Mar 2020 :  23:59:54  Show Profile Send BladeMage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
not sure if this would be the place to drop this question, but... Regarding Namarra, The Sword that Never Sleeps, What became of it after Old Ghost cast Horadoun out of the blade and chose to use it as his new form, post Knights of Myth Drannor Sword Never Sleeps? And if there was any other descriptions on what other "spellwork" was woven into it, that Old Ghost had been admiring?
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
5765 Posts

Posted - 01 Apr 2020 :  11:47:34  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The sword wasn't Namarra, it was Armakraun. A different sword that "never sleeps".

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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BladeMage
Acolyte

2 Posts

Posted - 02 Apr 2020 :  00:56:20  Show Profile Send BladeMage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I stand corrected, and thank you for th correction, George. I was giving thought to how one
could possibly establish a character.. a pc as effectively a sentient weapon that
could function fully independently.

Much thanks, and my apologies for my error.
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
5765 Posts

Posted - 02 Apr 2020 :  10:14:56  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Armakraun is an example of the way Ed treats magic in his campaign. As in, multi-layered. The novel speaks of how it has had many different enchantments laid on it by different races and casters. Whilst I think that the concept of a PC as a sentient weapon is "cool", I'm not sure how it works in practicality. By that I mean how do you weld that concept with the PC game mechanics? Things like hps, AC, abilities (class and feat), etc would all have to be bedded down and in a way that wasn't detrimental to the play experience of the other players. IMHO, for what it's worth, an independent, non-malevolent Armakraun acts as a brilliant NPC/plot device, interacting with the PCs as it (the DM) sees fit and aiding and abetting their adventures.

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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