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Mazrim_Taim
Learned Scribe

341 Posts

Posted - 27 Jun 2006 :  13:44:05  Show Profile  Visit Mazrim_Taim's Homepage Send Mazrim_Taim a Private Message  Reply with Quote  Delete Topic
I just downloaded the list of Dungeon printed Adventures that have been FR based. And I was wondering as to what the Sages of Candlekeep's opnions were as to what they thought was the best? This could mean the most detailed, most intriguing, etc.

This is mostly out of pure curiosity, and also to store in the back of my mind in case I ever decide to purchase some Dungeon magazines myself.

And if the PCs DO win their ways through all the liches to Larloch, “he” will almost certainly be just another lich (loaded with explosive spells) set up as a decoy, with dozens of hidden liches waiting to pounce on any surviving PCs who ‘celebrate’ after they take Larloch down. As the REAL Larloch watches (magical scrying) from afar. Myself, as DM, I’d be wondering: “Such a glorious game, so many opportunities laid out before your PCs to devote your time to, and THIS fixation is the best you can come up with? Are you SURE you’re adventurers?” -Ed Greenwood

Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 28 Jun 2006 :  02:09:02  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In my opinion, as a player and a DM, Eric Boyd's Eye of Myrkul (Dungeon #73) is the best FR module ever published in Dungeon Magazine. It has great maps, lots of wonderful background fluff, and a very moody and intriguing plot.

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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msatran
Learned Scribe

USA
210 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2006 :  06:18:57  Show Profile  Visit msatran's Homepage Send msatran a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, I'll be honest. My favorite Realms adventure that has ever shown up in Dungeon is Prison of the Firebringer. That adventure actually challenged my players, whereas most of the others turned into complete mowdowns.
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2006 :  07:06:40  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, I was never much of a Dungeon reader, but Storm Season was a great adventure, maybe my favorite of all printed FR adventures. I remember one of the Nightparade members having some sort of destructive effect on magical weapons that was very effective in reducing the PC arsenal of my campaign.
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Reefy
Senior Scribe

United Kingdom
892 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2006 :  11:42:19  Show Profile  Visit Reefy's Homepage  Click to see Reefy's MSN Messenger address Send Reefy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Asgetrion

In my opinion, as a player and a DM, Eric Boyd's Eye of Myrkul (Dungeon #73) is the best FR module ever published in Dungeon Magazine. It has great maps, lots of wonderful background fluff, and a very moody and intriguing plot.



I'll second that. I'd highly recommend running the whole of the Mere of Dead Men series though, because Eye of Myrkul is the last of five and the others were good too.

Life is either daring adventure or nothing.
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Snotlord
Senior Scribe

Norway
476 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2006 :  18:52:23  Show Profile  Visit Snotlord's Homepage Send Snotlord a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sadly I missed out on the AD&D Dungeon issues (in addition to most AD&D FR books), so I cannot comment on those.

I agree that "Prison of the Firebringer" is very cool, and I'd like it run it someday. I wish Rich Baker would write more FR stuff

The Seventh Arm feels alot like an FR story to me, although its a generic module.
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2006 :  01:40:54  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My fellow scribes Jorkens and msatran... with all due respect, you sound like you see your players/PCs as "opponents" in your campaigns? This is only my honest and humble opinion, but to me it seems that choosing a module that "almost succeeded in something that all the other modules failed to do - challenge my min-maxing PCs (who are probably world champions in this field)" to be the best Dungeon module set in FR.... maybe it is not chosen for the "right reasons", hey? Any module may be modified to offer challenge to any PCs, unless it is they who control the game, not the DM. And the same applies to "Oops, I gave them too many magic items, and now I gotta take some of them away"-type of reasoning...

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2006 :  05:52:18  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:

Originally posted by Asgetrion
My fellow scribes Jorkens and msatran... with all due respect, you sound like you see your players/PCs as "opponents" in your campaigns?


No offence taken, but this could not be further from the truth. I mentioned that detail because it stands out in my head. This was played as a solo adventure for an old PC from mid-teenage Monty haul days and even the player was quite happy when he, together with Myrmeen and a zenthish Wizard interested in clearing his name from the doings of the Night parade(another part of the adventure that I like), managed to complete the battle against the night parade. By then his 16th level kobolt assassin had one +1 sword and a couple of daggers left in his arsenal.

One usually remember when one can take ten magical items from a PC and their happy with the conclusion of the adventure. the module is chosen because it is a great story, has some great role playing possibilities and one of the few battle scenarios from a module that I like. The conclusion of the adventure is also filled with starting points for a political campaign.

All of this has nothing with characters as opponents to do.

Edited by - Jorkens on 01 Jul 2006 09:41:30
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Sanishiver
Senior Scribe

USA
476 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2006 :  08:03:15  Show Profile  Visit Sanishiver's Homepage Send Sanishiver a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Fellow Scribes:

The absolute best Dungeon Mag Realms adventure by far is --IMNSHO-- "The Door from Everywhere" by Roger E. Moore (Dungeon #88).

This adventure has it all.

It starts in Cormyr (noble intrigue aplenty, should a DM be so minded), takes a swing by 'The Black Crater' (read: Tilverton), sends the PCs off into the Stonelands (where bloody work lies ahead vis-a-vis Zhents, orcs and worse!), contains plenty of portals (that lend themselves well to the use of PC skills and abilities --good DMs can make happy players here) and totally lets a DM give his or her players a serious taste of the regions around Cormyr (including cities [some buried, too]), the history of the place (Netherese…need I say more?) and places well 'above' Cormyr (and we're not just talking in the sky --read for yourself to find out exactly where this adventure can take your campaign!).

What's more, the adventure doesn't really end. Moore left open the possibility of the PCs activating even more portals, which can lead darn near anywhere in the Realms.

If you have Mysteries of the Moonsea, this adventure is perfect as a lead in. Just run a portal from this adventure to Abarat’s Folly (MoTMS, page 84) and you’re set!

Heck, if you have any other Realms adventure or sourcebook, or even non-Realms adventures you're converting, then The Door From Everywhere is for you, because you can take your players anywhere with it.

Truly an expertly themed adventure that fits the style and flavor of the 3E Realms.

Can’t move on without mentioning: My favorite part as a DM in this adventure is the section that talks about Tilverton (in part): “…any PC who actually enters the pit is forever lost to the campaign; the player can tear up the character’s sheet and forget about it. Not even a wish spell…".

When I ran this adventure back in 2002 I deliberately read that part to my players; now I’m using Gates of Oblivion (Dungeon #136) to send them right into Tilverton. Sweet!

Second Best:
Probably Prison of the Firebringer, if only for Bazim-Gorag (Mr. Baker, you rule!).

Off Topic: Best non-Realms Dragon Adventures That Play Well In the Realms

Headless ... can't remember the magazine number this one's in. But I can tell you this is a great one to tie into The Door From Everywhere, because you can put your players right smack dab into the Silver Marches with it.

The Storm Lord's Keep; issue #91 ... sure it's Epic Level, but hey, when you've got places like the Giant Spire Mountains and relics of lost (perhaps Giantish) civilizations floating above the Stonelands...well something has to come out of them eventually.

And the previously mentioned Gates of Oblivion. Technically I’ve only gotten through the intro, but already my campaign is reaping the rewards. I live for moments when my players look truly worried, as when they learned in game that the black oblivion that was Tilverton was growing.

Anyway, sorry so wordy. Hope ye fellow scribes found something useful in this.

May ye have as much fun as we did (and still are!).

J. Grenemyer

09/20/2008: Tiger Army at the Catalyst in Santa Cruz. You wouldn’t believe how many females rode it out in the pit. Santa Cruz women are all of them beautiful. Now I know to add tough to that description.
6/27/2008: WALL-E is about the best damn movie Pixar has ever made. It had my heart racing and had me rooting for the good guy.
9/9/2006: Dave Mathews Band was off the hook at the Shoreline Amphitheater.

Never, ever read the game books too literally, or make such assumptions that what is omitted cannot be. Bad DM form, that.

And no matter how compelling a picture string theory paints, if it does not accurately describe our universe, it will be no more relevant than an elaborate game of Dungeons and Dragons. --paragraph 1, chapter 9, The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene

Edited by - Sanishiver on 01 Jul 2006 08:05:26
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Snotlord
Senior Scribe

Norway
476 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2006 :  10:00:52  Show Profile  Visit Snotlord's Homepage Send Snotlord a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Sanishiver

The Storm Lord's Keep; issue #91 ... sure it's Epic Level, but hey, when you've got places like the Giant Spire Mountains and relics of lost (perhaps Giantish) civilizations floating above the Stonelands...well something has to come out of them eventually.




Thats funny, I believe I have all the adventures you mention on my favorite list. Also, if you re-read the adventure hooks in the FRCS on the Dalelands or Cormyr (cannot remember which), I believe The Storm Lord's Keep is another FR "stealth design" from one of the WOTC designers. It fits perfectly!
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Mazrim_Taim
Learned Scribe

341 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2006 :  21:26:38  Show Profile  Visit Mazrim_Taim's Homepage Send Mazrim_Taim a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow, thanks everyone. I'll certainly consider these when I make my next Realms purchase. ;)

And if the PCs DO win their ways through all the liches to Larloch, “he” will almost certainly be just another lich (loaded with explosive spells) set up as a decoy, with dozens of hidden liches waiting to pounce on any surviving PCs who ‘celebrate’ after they take Larloch down. As the REAL Larloch watches (magical scrying) from afar. Myself, as DM, I’d be wondering: “Such a glorious game, so many opportunities laid out before your PCs to devote your time to, and THIS fixation is the best you can come up with? Are you SURE you’re adventurers?” -Ed Greenwood
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Faraer
Great Reader

3302 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2006 :  19:45:45  Show Profile  Visit Faraer's Homepage Send Faraer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ed Greenwood's short "Irongard" in #18 is my favourite. All of Eric Boyd's are essential reading too. Roger Moore's don't feel like the Realms to me.
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
4920 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2006 :  03:33:13  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"Eye of Myrkul" is my favourite. The 'support points' concept was brilliant.

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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Mazrim_Taim
Learned Scribe

341 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2006 :  10:09:46  Show Profile  Visit Mazrim_Taim's Homepage Send Mazrim_Taim a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George Krashos

"Eye of Myrkul" is my favourite. The 'support points' concept was brilliant.

-- George Krashos




Aye, I've heard that adventure mentioned many times on this site as well as others. Seems I need to go shopping on paizo.

Will probably end up printing it out and putting it in a binder, but I am weird like that.

And if the PCs DO win their ways through all the liches to Larloch, “he” will almost certainly be just another lich (loaded with explosive spells) set up as a decoy, with dozens of hidden liches waiting to pounce on any surviving PCs who ‘celebrate’ after they take Larloch down. As the REAL Larloch watches (magical scrying) from afar. Myself, as DM, I’d be wondering: “Such a glorious game, so many opportunities laid out before your PCs to devote your time to, and THIS fixation is the best you can come up with? Are you SURE you’re adventurers?” -Ed Greenwood
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msatran
Learned Scribe

USA
210 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2006 :  08:47:47  Show Profile  Visit msatran's Homepage Send msatran a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't treat the PC's as opponents. My players are just incredibly experienced and smart. Most of us have been playing for 30 years or more. The lowest amount of gaming experience in one of my many groups is 21 years. They don't make a lot of mistakes, they DO have brillient solutions to lots of things, and the average IQ in the group is somewhere around 135-150. How do you challenge people like this without exceptionally tough adventures?

The answer is, you can't, because smart people solve problems. Very few Dungeon adventures present "The Moral Dilemma" where the characters have a range of choices, each of which produces "A" good, or a different good. Human consequences are my bread and butter, and it's only when the PC's forget that there are human consequences and it is later shown what their actions did, that sometimes it feels like the DM is an "opponent."
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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2006 :  09:05:03  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage  Send GothicDan an AOL message  Send GothicDan an ICQ Message  Click to see GothicDan's MSN Messenger address  Send GothicDan a Yahoo! Message Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
So what you're asking for are roleplaying adventures, Msatran?

*Scoff*

;)

Planescape Fanatic

"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2006 :  22:11:11  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Sanishiver

Fellow Scribes:

The absolute best Dungeon Mag Realms adventure by far is --IMNSHO-- "The Door from Everywhere" by Roger E. Moore (Dungeon #88).

This adventure has it all.



I also warmly recommend this adventure, and certainly consider it to be in my Top 5 of all time greatest Dungeon Magazine's modules. A "must buy" for all Cormyr DMs


Prison of the Firebringer is quite good, too. I don't think it to be excellent in any aspect, though, and it is for high-level parties only.

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 05 Jul 2006 :  22:37:09  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by msatran

I don't treat the PC's as opponents. My players are just incredibly experienced and smart. Most of us have been playing for 30 years or more. The lowest amount of gaming experience in one of my many groups is 21 years. They don't make a lot of mistakes, they DO have brillient solutions to lots of things, and the average IQ in the group is somewhere around 135-150. How do you challenge people like this without exceptionally tough adventures?

The answer is, you can't, because smart people solve problems. Very few Dungeon adventures present "The Moral Dilemma" where the characters have a range of choices, each of which produces "A" good, or a different good. Human consequences are my bread and butter, and it's only when the PC's forget that there are human consequences and it is later shown what their actions did, that sometimes it feels like the DM is an "opponent."




Alright, smart people solve problems, but so do dumb people - everyone in their own way. And while your players may be true geniuses, I hazard a guess that not all of their PCs are?

IMHO roleplaying (or adventures, for that matter) isn't only about solving problems or challenges. I think that roleplaying a character may present challenges and moral dilemmas enough in itself. I don't see, personally, adventures as "problems to be solved" ("Hey, this NPC must be the real bad guy, and I think I got the whole plot of the adventure puzzled out by now.")

If you claim that players with high IQ can only be challenged through "tough adversaries" (=high CR monsters or NPCs), I disagree with you a bit. I don't play D&D to min-max my characters, nor do I let my knowledge and experience as a player to influence how my "low INT" and/or inexperienced PCs might act or solve problems. Each character may approach things in his own way, as he sees fit. Some adventures or encounters may be total disasters because of it. But there is no "right" or "wrong" way to play the game - just different ones!

If you feel that "ready-to-run" modules lack enough moral dilemmas, you might modify them to have those choices for your PCs, hey?

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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msatran
Learned Scribe

USA
210 Posts

Posted - 07 Jul 2006 :  09:07:54  Show Profile  Visit msatran's Homepage Send msatran a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Of course not all of their PC's are true geniuses. Sometimes, they roleplay their way into death. But in general, I've discovered that all numbers aside, the system is now designed for the PC's to roll over every monster. There are too many feats, too many classes, and too many special abilities and spells that destroy the ability of the dungeon master to create a character driven plot without creating a tough moral choice for the PCs. Sometimes it can be as simple as: Sometimes, doing one thing will be the right thing to do. And the very next time the PC's choose to do that thing, it will be unequivocably the WRONG thing.

I really do have faith that my players will beat most monsters of an equivalent CR without miraculous rolling on the part of the monster. I just have this feeling that the game is not as difficult as it used to be, and that the level of challenge for the PC's vs. joe monster has been vastly downgraded.
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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 07 Jul 2006 :  09:44:48  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage  Send GothicDan an AOL message  Send GothicDan an ICQ Message  Click to see GothicDan's MSN Messenger address  Send GothicDan a Yahoo! Message Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I agree, too.

There's a lot of really subtle ways that this is played out. One of which is the fact that it's vastly easier to create magic items now, and it's assumed by the publishers that you WILL give your PCs access to a certain number of items of X power at Y level. This never really happened in previous editions. Also, there's the fact that many books aimed at PCs actually try to MAKE things easier for them; I remember being shocked when I read Tome and Blood and it was like, "Hey, you can even use Weapon Focus/Specialization on spells!" Uh.. Right.. Powergame, much?

Also, there's the fact that nowadays there's a lot of Feats and such that specifically improve certain aspects of your character (like bonuses to Saves and such), whereas previously these things were very rare. The same can be said of stat-boosts, which were pretty much unheard of in previous editions.

And, last in my personal list off the top of my head, is the fact that abilities start actually giving bonuses as low as having a 12! What's this!? Ridiculous. ;)

I'm sure there's a lot more. But, the fact was, in 2E, very often you HAD to be a smart player to survive. Wizards didn't have access to ranged weaponry, and at first level, had access to ONE spell in a day (MAYBE 2 if you specialized or took a signature spell). If your wizard got into combat below 5th level, there was a pretty good chance that he would be dead. One or two hits by a good fighter, and - the end.

In 3E, it's not so much the same, unless you actively stack the odds against your players by increasing level/items/etc. of your antagonists. So, in a way, you have to focus on building the enemies in opposition to PCs who can find avenues of power way too easily. Sure, the DM can change whatever he or she wants, but we're analyzing the game edition, here, not how individual people play it (since that varies from one group to another immensely).

Uh.. Sorry for going so off-topic, guys. :(

I blame Msatran!

Planescape Fanatic

"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD

Edited by - GothicDan on 07 Jul 2006 09:47:08
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scererar
Master of Realmslore

USA
1615 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2006 :  06:23:38  Show Profile Send scererar a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I used to use almost all of my adventures from dungeon. I just kept adding the ones I liked each month into my existing realms campaign. I believe that almost all of them will fit at some point or another.

"Yap,yap, little dog!" - Riven - page 326 Shadowbred, by Paul Kemp

_________________________

I don't know half of you half as well as I should like; and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.
- J. R. R. Tolkien
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Sanishiver
Senior Scribe

USA
476 Posts

Posted - 13 Jul 2006 :  23:14:34  Show Profile  Visit Sanishiver's Homepage Send Sanishiver a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I disagree with Dan's assessment pretty much all the way (no surprise there) and have come to quite different conclusions than msatran...but instead of polluting the scroll, I think I'll start my own and invite anyone interested to have a look.

J. Grenemyer

09/20/2008: Tiger Army at the Catalyst in Santa Cruz. You wouldn’t believe how many females rode it out in the pit. Santa Cruz women are all of them beautiful. Now I know to add tough to that description.
6/27/2008: WALL-E is about the best damn movie Pixar has ever made. It had my heart racing and had me rooting for the good guy.
9/9/2006: Dave Mathews Band was off the hook at the Shoreline Amphitheater.

Never, ever read the game books too literally, or make such assumptions that what is omitted cannot be. Bad DM form, that.

And no matter how compelling a picture string theory paints, if it does not accurately describe our universe, it will be no more relevant than an elaborate game of Dungeons and Dragons. --paragraph 1, chapter 9, The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene
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Asgetrion
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1564 Posts

Posted - 19 Jul 2006 :  04:43:23  Show Profile  Visit Asgetrion's Homepage Send Asgetrion a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by scererar

I used to use almost all of my adventures from dungeon. I just kept adding the ones I liked each month into my existing realms campaign. I believe that almost all of them will fit at some point or another.



And if they do not, then you have to nudge the players going into the right direction in your campaign

"What am I doing today? Ask me tomorrow - I can be sure of giving you the right answer then."
-- Askarran of Selgaunt, Master Sage, speaking to a curious merchant, Year of the Helm
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Brakkart
Seeker

United Kingdom
17 Posts

Posted - 16 Aug 2006 :  02:14:40  Show Profile  Visit Brakkart's Homepage  Click to see Brakkart's MSN Messenger address Send Brakkart a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Considering that I got a 2 year campaign out of expanding the central premise of the module "Slave Vats of the Yuan-ti", I'll have to cast my vote for that as my favourite Dungeon module.

Second place goes to Prison of the Firebringer which my PC's are battling their way through on Friday nights at the moment.

Read my blog at: http://tauntonian.blogspot.com Here I post ramblings, book reviews, song lyrics and assorted weirdness.

Check out my "Rise of the Snakemen" Forgotten Realms Story Hour. http://www.enworld.org/forums/showthread.php?t=100196
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Ardashir
Senior Scribe

USA
544 Posts

Posted - 08 Sep 2006 :  16:54:40  Show Profile  Visit Ardashir's Homepage Send Ardashir a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow, sounds like there's been a lot of great Realms adventures in DUNGEON over the years. I have missed so much...
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kthazel
Acolyte

1 Posts

Posted - 29 Dec 2016 :  23:25:33  Show Profile Send kthazel a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I know this is an old topic but if anyone is still reading it I want your opinion on a new kickstarter that looks like it may be similar to Dungeon magazine. I need a source of plenty of sidetrek adventures so my gamers feel like they are in an open world setting picking their own path. Heres a link, what do you think.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/112107051/itherverse-multi-genre-rpg-adventure-ezine-for-any
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