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createvmind
Senior Scribe

490 Posts

Posted - 02 Aug 2007 :  01:21:58  Show Profile  Visit createvmind's Homepage Send createvmind a Private Message
Hello All,

An add-on to my previous question on raising dead, Faerun has far more humanoid races than the spell 'Reincarnate' describes, would you have added some of these races to the possible choices the dead might return as?


And oh yeah, are Titans NDA? In terms of where they now dwell?
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  01:21:13  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, fellow scribes. This time I bring you Ed’s response to createvmind’s query: “What magic works within Candlekeep if that’s not NDA, If NPC has Rary's Telepathic Bond with someone and enters Candlekeep library can he speak via the magic?
Teleportation, divination and such that can be done, if this has been mentioned before then ignore please.”
Ed replies:


There are strong NDAs relating to this topic, though some hints can be gleaned by reading the Introduction to Candlekeep I wrote for Alaundo some years back. In general, however, all forms of translocation (teleportation), telepathic and mental communication and influence, and “spying,” are either prohibited or “clouded” (made weak and unreliable, either not functioning or working for very short distances or durations, or reaching the wrong destinations or conclusions) due to “something about” Candlekeep. Certain high-ranking individuals at Candlekeep seem to be able to “reach out” of Candlekeep to practice such things on a limited basis, and (secret and hidden, one-way-outbound) gates (portals) are known to exist linking Candlekeep with (undisclosed) locations outside Candlekeep, but no one not of divine status seems to be able to “reach in” from outside Candlekeep. Again, only higher-ranking persons of Candlekeep seem to be able to accomplish such magics within Candlekeep (from place to place within the walls, not reaching outside).
However, specifics (and exceptions) remain, regrettably, mysterious at this time. :}



So saith Ed. Creator of Candlekeep (the fictional original, not this splendid site), of course. He regrets not being able to properly bring it to life in fiction, yet, and hopes to someday publish his early short story, “The Endless Chants of Alaundo.”
love to all,
THO
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createvmind
Senior Scribe

490 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  03:14:55  Show Profile  Visit createvmind's Homepage Send createvmind a Private Message
Thank you, just trying to add to my knowledge with that question and be prepared for such a situation in gaming.
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CorranH
Acolyte

3 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  07:21:35  Show Profile  Visit CorranH's Homepage Send CorranH a Private Message
I know this is a bit late but I want to thank Ed for his extensive reply to my question about Skull Gorge et all.

Only today (and quite by accident) I found the answer in pdf 14.

So anyway, my thanks oh great creator.

(And the answer still is in time for me to use it; the players are only level 7 right now.)
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Baleful Avatar
Learned Scribe

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  16:00:21  Show Profile  Visit Baleful Avatar's Homepage Send Baleful Avatar a Private Message
Hello, Ed and lovely Lady THO,
I just happened across a copy of SWORDS OF DRAGONFIRE in a publishers' warehouse this morning (and am heading over to the relevant discussion thread to post my impressions, after shamefully neglecting all of my other work for 2 hours to devour it), but it prompted me to ask for an update to something that was asked of you (by Faraer? Or is my memory faulty?): what's your bedside reading, Ed, right now? Or in the last week or so? (What you're allowed to tell us without breaking any NDAs, at least.)
Thanks.
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  20:26:22  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all!
ddporter, although Ed understudied for the role of Major-General Stanley, ...

(snip)

The Steel Regent recently let slip ...

(snip)

So saith Ed. Who tells me this snippet “fell out of” his lore-notes for the current Knights of Myth Drannor trilogy. And that he might be able to find us something on a few of the ghosts who haunt the Palace, too.
love to all,
THO




Oh, bravi!


I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  20:37:36  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all. This time Ed replies to a recent query from Kajehase: “I saw something Katherine Kerr said about the differences between the human and elven physioloies on a mailing-list for fans of her Deverry books and thought it'd be interesting to hear how much of that holds true in the Realms, so..."

(snip)


So saith Ed. Who has spent two days repairing and setting up no less than three iMacs to replace various older and finally dying Macs. As he told me: “It’s getting so I can field-strip the things to replace dead CMOS batteries without thinking at all, so I can go right on writing with my other hand.”
love to all,
THO




Oh, well done! May I ship you my Mac II for repair, Ed? (That's just a Mac II ... no suffixes way back then.) For the record, I STILL use a Mac SE which I got for FREE at a Library book sale.

Ahem. As for the elf-human thing, since Ed liked what I said on it a couple of years ago, I beg to add that Rich Burlew's On the Origin of PCs has, if I recall correctly, a conversation between Haley and Varsuuvius on the topic of human adventurers rapidly gaining levels as opposed to hundred-year-old elves just reaching Wizard 1st. (Spoiler follows.) Either then or elsewhen Varsuuvius revealed the big downside of Elf physiology: "Twenty years in diapers...."


I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2007 :  20:59:57  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf

Mr. Greenwood, if you please,

I've noticed, through my albeit limited experience with the Forgotten Realms novels and a response to a question you answered for me several months ago, that the entries into the FR mythos seem to be very much on the grand scale. Heroes and villains battle for the fate of cities, kingdoms, and populations. ...

(snip)

Much thanks,
GoCeraf



Do, do do read all of Ed's answers, which kuje has cataloged and pdf'd. Last year, in response to a question, Ed related the very moving story of a love affair between an orc and a human in response to a query re: "Where do half-orcs come from?"

I think that the reason that so much Realms writing seems to be "on a grand scale" is that even when the participants in stories don't realize the full significance of what they are doing, they are shaping the Realms to some degree, greater or smaller. In one short story whose name eludes me (in Realms of the Arcane?), a young fellow out for a night on the town in Waterdeep goes on an "adventure" as a result of a drunken barroom conversation; it hardly seems Realms-shaking ... until you reach the end of the story. I think that one of the great appeals of D&D, and the Forgotten Realms in particular, is that "little folk" can change their world (or several worlds); witness the Cloakmaster cycle, in which an unhappy veteran of the War of the Lance, and only a mere mule-skinner in it, literally has an "adventure" dropped on him, and he goes from being an obscure dirt farmer in some backwater of Krynn to a hero of several worlds, Toril included. Several of the heroes of Lady of Decay become "heroes" solely because unhappy experiences in their youths set them on paths which collided and then shook the Realms (or the Unapproachable East, at least). Outside of D&D, there is a seven volume series of novels which reaches its ultimate conclusion largely due to the very, very unhappy childhoods or teen years of many characters who ultimately all cross paths; I think it's all called "Harry Potter" or some such thing.




I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  01:36:36  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Jamallo, Ed chuckled at your Harry Potter reference. He told me he still has two Mac IIs, but both have the same fault: a capacitor has "gone bad" somewhere on the motherboard, so he can start each of them up ONCE (because they fry the entire power supply, each time they run). As getting power supplies is now darn near impossible, Ed doesn't turn them on any more. You'll probably be happy to know many early Realms products were written on those Mac IIs.
love,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  01:44:25  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, scribes of the Keep. Ed has sent me his Realmslore tidbit, so here it is (but first, he wants createvmind and CorranH to know they’re very welcome for the lore replies, and to by all means keep Realms questions coming).
This time around, he tackles this question from Athenon: “Hi Ed and THO, I wanted to ask Ed if he has any insight into the hiccup in FR RPG products coming up. Also, any previews of what will be revealed at GenCon? He is going right? Any chance Ed will run a Forgotten Realms game there?”
Ed replies:



I will certainly be at GenCon, barring vehicular breakdowns or other misfortunes. Unfortunately, as of right now it doesn’t look as if I’ll have time to run any Realmsplay sessions there. Remember, folks, this is a working convention for me, with the need to squeeze in business meetings among the shopping and eating (usually with friends I see once a year, and absolutely refuse to forego my “fun time” with) and sleeping, to say nothing of the events I’m participating in. (As usual, I can’t show up at the Wizards’ freelancer meeting because it conflicts with something else I’ve agreed to attend.) However, I will go over my schedule again several times before I depart to attend the show, just in case.
As far as the “hiccup” in upcoming “FR RPG products,” I am not now and never have been an employee of Wizards of the Coast, or of TSR. Product scheduling has often been as much a matter of surprise and mystery to me as it is to any other gamer walking into a store, seeing something new on display, and reacting with interest. Not always, but often. For obvious reasons, the timing of product releases is something any publisher regards as vital to their business, and therefore their bailiwick, and theirs to keep secret if they want to. In my “other life” at the public library and as a good customer and close friend of an independent bookstore owner who often gets shown catalogues, I usually see the mini-catalogs WotC sends out to the trade, and so have some advance warning of what will appear when. NDAs of course prevent my saying anything at all about forthcoming products I am involved in, except as Wizards allows - - and that holds true in this particular case, of course. So: sorry, but my lips must remain sealed at this time. (If you want to taste lips that are parted, willing, and eager, I recommend THO’s. ;})



So saith Ed, handing yours truly a testimonial at the end there that I purringly agree with.
love to all,
THO
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  05:24:48  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
I didn't expect so much interest in my question, and so many sides of the argument. Jarmallo, I also have to chuckle in the direction of your HP reference, though for slightly different reasons. I'd quote you, but... well... I don't know how.

Since I've gotten so much input from the rest of the board, Ms. THO, I think it should be alright for you, unless he's working on it this very moment, to remove my query from Mr. Greenwood's noticeably massive pile.

Much thanks eveh-buddy,
GoCeraf

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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Skeptic
Master of Realmslore

Canada
1273 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  06:43:34  Show Profile Send Skeptic a Private Message
Hi,

I think I have an interesting question that Ed could answer without NDAs problems.

I would really much like a short description of all the "empty" areas of realms. By "empty" I mean all the place light-green colored on the FR interactive atlas. Generally, all the place between forests, swamps, mountains, cities, etc. I don't want so much place-specific details, but a general picture.

When I DM, it's always those areas that I have the more trouble describing to the players : settled or not settled? If settled, only farms/herding lands or hamlet (like Rassalantar but not on map) ? What's the density of the settlements? etc..

Of course the main areas would be : the North, Cormyr, Western Heartlands, Amn, Tethyr, Sembia, the Dales, Moonsea north, etc.

It's something that I guess Ed could come with quickly (not meaning he will answer fast) but if it's too much of work for what can be done here, I'll understand.

Thanks.

Edited by - Skeptic on 04 Aug 2007 06:44:33
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1631 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  12:42:27  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage  Send Steven Schend a Yahoo! Message Send Steven Schend a Private Message
Hi there, Ed & THO,

Here's a question that'll add to an unknown corner of the Realms (I think): We know of halflings' love of pipeweed (but rarely have discussed varieties and blends/brands), and we've talked at times of human drinks (especially since Ed, Julia, & I came up with all the beers, ales, and wines in the Aurora's Guide oh-so-long ago).

So what are the vices and/or luxuries coveted by goblins, hobgoblins, or ogres? Mountain grown herbs and fruits turned into alcohols or something of which we've never heard?

Curious minds wish to know...but no rush. I'll buy you a drink at Gen Con first, methinks.

Steven

For current projects and general natter, see www.steveneschend.com

Edited by - Steven Schend on 04 Aug 2007 12:43:00
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Eledir Tarsis
Acolyte

Australia
6 Posts

Posted - 04 Aug 2007 :  17:10:07  Show Profile  Visit Eledir Tarsis's Homepage Send Eledir Tarsis a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Penknight

Hail to thee, Hooded Lady. It is I, the Knight of the Pen with more queries for the Crafter of Worlds and Spinner of Legends.

I have recently been reading my copy of The Fall of Myth Drannor and came across the death of Aravae Irithyl and her armathor guardians on the night of Shieldmeet. I read about the clues that were left behind (the splashes of black mud on her bed and on the wall), as well as the black bruises of elven hands around their throats. Then I read over Lost Empires of Faerun and found that the identity of her murderer was Illitrin Starym, the wielder of Darkmoon, I believe. I was wondering if it was Mr. Greenwood that came up with the identity of the murderer back in 2nd Edition or if that was something that designers of the book (LEoF) came up with for 3e. Also, was the Starym moonblade used in some way to assist in their murder? And finally... the black mud. I think that Moander was the one that twisted the magics living inside the Starym blade, but I'm not 100% sure. Was the black mud tied in some way to Moander? I was thinking it might have been a spell that those tied directly to him might have access to, but wasn't sure. Thank you so much for your time, my lady. It is greatly appreciated.

Also, in closing, a friend of mine gave me an almost-new boxed set of The Ruins of Myth Drannor for Christmas, and I wanted to thank Mr. Greenwood for all of the hard work that he put into making such a wonderful boxed set. It was hearing an old DM of mine back in 1999 that got me into D&D, specifically Forgotten Realms. If it hadn't been for such a wonderful tale on both my DM's part as well as Mr. Greenwood's, I may never have gotten into D&D. So again, my thanks.


"Farewell to Arms" a vorpal glossary * Beauty is in the eyes of the.aaagh forget it!!!!
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 05 Aug 2007 :  02:01:05  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, fellow scribes. This time I bring you Ed’s response to this recent query from GoCeraf: “Mr. Greenwood, if you please, I've noticed, through my albeit limited experience with the Forgotten Realms novels and a response to a question you answered for me several months ago, that the entries into the FR mythos seem to be very much on the grand scale. Heroes and villains battle for the fate of cities, kingdoms, and populations. I don't mean, however, that these are flawed concepts, as we've seen countless times that they work quite well. Is there room, though, for more personal novels in the Forgotten Realms, that tell the stories of the few and separate? Much of the material for the campaign setting comes from those far-reaching entries, and more personal stories would have little-to-no effect on the larger scale Faerun. Does that mean that they're unwanted or unallowed?
Much thanks,
GoCeraf”
Ed replies:



I don’t think so. Just as several helpful scribes have pointed out already, “small-scale” or personal-focus stories make regular appearances in the “quartets” of novels (e.g. the Fighters series). Although I am asked to write books about such key Realms characters as Elminster (and tend to populate my pages with the likes of the Chosen, the royal family of Cormyr, and various Lords of Waterdeep), I try to keep my storytelling closely focused on characters, and feature “unknowns” (such as Shandril, or the fledgling adventurers who became the Knights of Myth Drannor) as my protagonists.
However, regardless of who’s sitting in the editorial chairs at TSR or Wizards, down the passing years, any publisher is interested in selling the maximum number of books. One worthy way of doing that is to simultaneously offer for sale on the stores shelves a variety of different styles of fantasy story, from romances to kingdom-shattering war epics to the big setting-altering events that we refer to here at the Keep as RSEs, and from dungeon crawling to piracy to court intrigue. The full buffet, as it were. Something for everyone.
So at the same time as writers (newer writers doing standalone novels, in particular) are telling smaller-compass tales that entertain within the covers of a single book, other writers are spinning larger yarns that will run to three books in length or more - - and those larger tales usually have higher stakes; regardless of how much or how little they change the Realms in the end (the Threat From The Sea, for instance, had a relatively minor long-lasting effect for surface-dwelling mainlanders), they are the “grand scale” stories you mention.
Not everything will be to everyone’s taste; that’s a given (and a good thing: can you imagine a world where every restaurant had only one meal on the menu? Because that one thing was the only meal every last living person liked?).
The grand scale stories by their very nature upset more readers, and attract more discussion; they can certainly seem to be the perennial centers of attention.
Yet the smaller-scale stories are always there, in part because TSR and now Wizards have always been on the lookout for new writers, who tend to start with single-book projects to get comfortable telling book-length stories and settling into the Realms - - and in part because there is always a demand for stories that entertain satisfyingly on their own, rather than sprawling over many books to do so. I have written trilogies intended as trilogies, but I have also written many more series in which I have tried to tell satisfying stories “inside” each book, so a reader who never has access to prequels or sequels can still enjoy the lone book they do find.
To turn to fantasy novels in general: there are many series I love, but on the other hand (despite the intense commercial pressure to write sequels to books that have sold well) many of the real classics of the field were intended as, or are, stand-alone books (or remained so for years, until authors or their estates finally gave in to demands for sequels). To note just a few examples: The Face In The Frost by John Bellairs; Tigana and A Song For Arbonne by Guy Gavriel Kay; The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle; Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke; The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (yes, always intended to be, and thought of as, a single work by its author, but split for length reasons by its original publisher); all of Merritt’s fantasies; and most of Patricia McKillip’s and Lynn Abbey’s recent fantasies.
There’s a huge additional bookshelf of standalone books that share a setting with other novels by the same writer, but essentially function as a standalone books (most of Norton’s Witch World novels, Caroline Stevermer’s fantasies; McKinley’s The Hero And The Crown and The Blue Sword; Tolkien’s The Hobbit, which [to the casual reader, not the author] is linked more by scholarship and material by Tolkien published after his death to LOTR, than it is by the published books, unless one reads them in succession and in the right chronological order). Over time, these can build into series, as evolving chronologies and reader demands cause “gaps” to be filled in with new books - - but the individual books for the most part have to “work” as stand-alone stories (one last example of this: Steven Brust’s Khaavren romances).



So saith Ed. Who can expound for hours on such matters (few people have fantasy collections as large as his, and his reading is much wider than his collection), and who prefers small-scale, personal-focus stories because - - with notable exceptions he’s mentioned earlier, such as Tolkien, May, J.V. Jones and some of Guy Kay’s books - - they usually work better as storytelling than the “cast of thousands crashes together” books.
(Yes, GoCeraf, I know you suggested removing this query from Ed’s pile unless Ed was already working on a reply - - but as you can see, he was. )
love to all,
THO
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 05 Aug 2007 :  05:01:26  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
That's twice that I got more than I expected.

It's heartening, especially since I've only started reading realms novels in the past couple of years, and my experience is limited to Bob Salvatore (I'm friends with a first-degree fanboy). So far, every story I've come across has focused on the few but affected the many, and I'm getting rather tired of reading about the drow.

Regardless, it's always good to hear that your worries are for naught. Hopefully, this time, I'll come up with another question before six months have passed.

Much thanks and inspiration,
GoCeraf

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.

Edited by - GoCeraf on 05 Aug 2007 18:32:25
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  02:41:09  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all. This time Ed turns to a still-warm query from Baleful Avatar: “Hello, Ed and lovely Lady THO,
I just happened across a copy of SWORDS OF DRAGONFIRE in a publishers' warehouse this morning (and am heading over to the relevant discussion thread to post my impressions, after shamefully neglecting all of my other work for 2 hours to devour it), but it prompted me to ask for an update to something that was asked of you (by Faraer? Or is my memory faulty?): what's your bedside reading, Ed, right now? Or in the last week or so? (What you're allowed to tell us without breaking any NDAs, at least.)
Thanks.”
Ed replies:



Easily done, and a pleasure. Limiting myself to the past ten days or so, there are three books I can’t name for NDA reasons, and a whole bunch of stuff I’ve been reading and re-reading for World Fantasy judging reasons (about which I’m not going to make any specific mentions or recommendations here, at this time, because to do so would be a trifle unethical before more about the finalists is published). And there are the “library duty” books that I MUST read, regardless of my own tastes; a recent and enjoyable one (that I would have read anyway) was the last Harry Potter book.
However, there are also books I am perfectly at liberty to mention, to whit:

A SWORD FROM RED ICE by J.V. Jones, third in a series, forthcoming (October) from Tor. One of the Tor editors sent me this to “blurb,” and I absolutely loved it. Highly recommended, AFTER you’ve read the previous books (A CAVERN OF BLACK ICE, A FORTRESS OF GREY ICE) in this (Sword of Shadows) series (it’s not a trilogy; this saga should continue in future books). Jones deftly and ably handles a huge cast of characters better than anyone writing fantasy today except Guy Gavriel Kay and Julian May.

THE WORLD WITHOUT US by Alan Weisman, a recently-released hardcover from Thomas Dunne Books (St. Martin’s Press). A well-written non-fiction look at what the Earth would be like if humanity vanished (our cities and other engineering feats being “overgrown,” as nature reclaims sway over the changes we wrought). Fascinating.

THE 100-MILE DIET (A Year of Local Eating) by Alisa Smith and J.B. MacKinnon, current hardcover from Random House Canada. I enjoyed this non-fiction book enough to re-read it less than a month after first reading it. It’s a “how it felt to us” account of a couple (based in British Columbia, Canada) who tried to go for a year eating only food that had travelled less than a hundred miles from source to their plates. Interesting reading, about a lot more than just the food. I haven’t tried any of the recipes that head the chapters yet, but hope to.

SUNDAY ROAST (The Complete Guide to Cooking & Carving) by Clarissa Dickson Wright (the surviving member of the Two Fat Ladies) and Johnny Scott. Brits may know this pair from three seasons of the TV series “Clarissa and the Countryman.” Non-fiction, Kyle Cathie Ltd., a 2006 trade paperback reissue of a 2002 Headline original. One of those gorgeous droolworthy books of “food porn” photos and accompanying recipes and lore, all about the “big” weekly main meat dish of a British household. Don’t even look at this book if you’re hungry. (Unless a huge meal that includes several roasts is piping-hot-ready for you in the next room.)

MAD KESTREL by Misty Massey, forthcoming (2008) from Tor. A romantic light-fantasy (invented setting, touches of magic that anchor the story but don’t dominate it) swashbuckling “first novel” about pirates, centered on a female protagonist (Kestrel). I was sent this to “blurb,” and liked it. Not to everyone’s taste; the action can be swift and furious, but this is far more mood, internal monologue, and personal confrontations than it is hundreds of sworded pirate bodies, flaming sinking ships, Captain Jack Sparrow types, and so on.

THE NEW WORLD by Michael A. Stackpole, 2007 trade Bantam Spectra paperback. Third in The Age of Discovery series (preceded by A SECRET ATLAS and CARTOMANCY). Mike should be well-known to all gamers, Star Wars fans, and comics fans. He once “almost” wrote a Realms novel, and I’ve never managed to find a bad Stackpole book yet; I pick up everything he writes and devour it; this series and his recent DragonCrown War Cycle of four books should be right up every gamer’s alley, as enjoyable reads even if they don’t spark campaign ideas.

THE HISTORY OF THE HOBBIT, Part Two: RETURN TO BAG-END by John D. Rateliff, HarperCollins 2007 hardcover. The sequel to Part One: MR. BAGGINS, by longtime Wizards and TSR staffer and reigning American Tolkien expert (accept no substitutes! Aside, Shippey, I say!) John Rateliff. I couldn’t wait for the American edition of this second book (coming this fall), and ordered the UK one right away. This is exhaustive and important Tolkien scholarship, but will merely be interesting reading to those who want more straight-ahead Middle-Earth fiction (for that, see CHILDREN OF HURIN [sorry, can’t do the accent mark over the “U” in this primitive e-mail]).

THE LAST STAND (A Journey Through the Ancient Cliff-Face Forest of the Niagara Escarpment) by Peter E. Kelly & Douglas W. Larson, Natural Heritage Books (The Dundurn Group) 2007 trade paperback. A gorgeous, loving photo-and-text tour of the truly ancient (oldest known one dates from 688 A.D.) stunted cedar trees growing out of the cliffs of the Escarpment that gives the “fox-head” of Southern Ontario its “ears.” Of personal interest to anyone (like me) who has hiked the escarpment end-to-end and spent many happy weekends crawling down the Rattlesnake Point caves. A younger, slimmer, more agile me touched many of these trees, and they (and their cliffs and the talus and forest below) are what I think of when visualizing the headwaters of the Delimbiyr (nigh Hellgate Keep).

And that’s about it; I had a huge stack of current magazines to read, and favourite short stories (Kipling as well as more recent) to re-read, and so didn’t get through much more. Waiting for me tonight: a treat that unfortunately has NDA stamped all over it.



So saith Ed. Who as you can see still tries to read for several hours every day, no matter what else is happening.
love to all,
THO
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Kentinal
Great Reader

4274 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  02:50:40  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message
Plural marriages?

Do they exist in the realms at all, and if so are they accepted well?

I do recall discussions indicating little comendation of extramarital and same sex associations then real world. It even strikes that some long term associations are not in effect legal marriages in the first place.

I can and do expext to learn it varries somewhat per culture about what association is recognised as legal.

"Small beings can have small wisdom," the dragon said. "And small wise beings are better than small fools. Listen: Wisdom is caring for afterwards."
"Caring for afterwards ...? Ker repeated this without understanding.
"After action, afterwards," the dragon said. "Choose the afterwards first, then the action. Fools choose action first."
"Judgement" copyright 2003 by Elizabeth Moon
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  03:08:30  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

He once “almost” wrote a Realms novel, and I’ve never managed to find a bad Stackpole book yet; I pick up everything he writes and devour it; this series and his recent DragonCrown War Cycle of four books should be right up every gamer’s alley, as enjoyable reads even if they don’t spark campaign ideas.




That "almost" breaks my heart. I would love to have seen what Stackpole would do in a Realms novel.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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USA
29798 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  05:42:25  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by KnightErrantJR

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

He once “almost” wrote a Realms novel, and I’ve never managed to find a bad Stackpole book yet; I pick up everything he writes and devour it; this series and his recent DragonCrown War Cycle of four books should be right up every gamer’s alley, as enjoyable reads even if they don’t spark campaign ideas.




That "almost" breaks my heart. I would love to have seen what Stackpole would do in a Realms novel.




Ditto that... Stackpole is one of the few authors who can sell me a novel by putting his name on it.

In fact... The other day, I was given a gift card to start rebuilding my collection of novels with. Though the rest of the order was for two particular authors, I made a point of ordering a particularly well-enjoyed Stackpole novel. I'm going to have a hell of a time tracking down some of the other ones by him that I used to have, though.

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31687 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  06:01:17  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
I'm not surprised that a Davion would feel this way about Stackpole's work.

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"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage

Edited by - The Sage on 06 Aug 2007 06:02:27
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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USA
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Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  10:17:58  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

I'm not surprised that a Davion would feel this way about Stackpole's work.




The fact that Stackpole favored the best of the Great Houses just shows how utterly cool he is.

I mean, who would have respected him if he liked that crazy Liao family?

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Iliana N-letur
Acolyte

Netherlands
13 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  10:43:12  Show Profile  Visit Iliana N-letur's Homepage Send Iliana N-letur a Private Message
I can live with Constructs, Warforged (popping in from Eberon), even mechanical familiars, but No 'Mechs. The realms are unnatural enough at it is.

(Unless it's an unseen of course <grin>)

Edit: so if Stackpole wrote a Realms novel, how many Staffs of Wizardry and/or Staffs of Power would be broken?

A small (4'9") moon elf, with odd pale golden hair and startling violet eyes. See her for the first time, there's fair bit of Faerie 'fascinate' involved.
A slightly curved sword and pseudo dragon familiar are never far away.

Edited by - Iliana N-letur on 06 Aug 2007 10:47:40
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
29798 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2007 :  14:35:57  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Iliana N-letur

I can live with Constructs, Warforged (popping in from Eberon), even mechanical familiars, but No 'Mechs. The realms are unnatural enough at it is.

(Unless it's an unseen of course <grin>)

Edit: so if Stackpole wrote a Realms novel, how many Staffs of Wizardry and/or Staffs of Power would be broken?



Aw, so does that mean you don't want to read my fanfic about the Chosen trying to fight Kai Allard-Liao (in Yen-Lo-Wang, of course) and a Star of Jade Falcon Elementals? Or how about the one where Fzoul Chembryl allies with Sun-Tzu Liao?

And on that note, we should prolly let Ed have his thread back.

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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 07 Aug 2007 :  01:47:10  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, everybody. This time Ed essays an answer of sorts to Auralis, specifically to this query: “Had a few questions in regards to the High Harpers, namely, who and what they might be. It seems, after looking through several sourcebooks that there are mentions again and again (specifically in the FRCS, though curiously no mention whatsoever in Code of the Harpers) regarding High Harpers, but absolutely no in depth information regarding them. Are the High Harpers simply the most senior Master Harpers as mentioned in Code of the Harpers (ie- Elminster, Storm, and the like), or are they some other, hidden-quite-well folks that the FRCS alludes to as being elected by secret ballot? If the latter, is there any information you could provide on them, who they might be (aside from the oh so brief mention of a High Harper Paladin of Milil in City of Splendors: Waterdeep), and if they receive any blessings from the harper deities beyond that of a Master Harper? Thanks!”
Ed replies:



No, I’m afraid I can’t provide much, beyond pirouetting like a fashion model to show you the bright, elegant NDAs I’m wearing. Yet ere I race back into the wings, let me whisper just this much: no, they are not “simply the most senior Master Harpers,” and therefore, yes they are “some other” folks, who - - yes again - - are indeed “hidden-quite-well” for the most part. As to their organization, strength (beyond saying that their numbers are small), and special powers, if any, not to mention special relationships with deities, if any: about those matters, I can say nothing at all. Yet.



So saith Ed. Who probably added a silent “Bwoohahahaha!” to that last word. Yes (he just e-pinched me), he did. Saucy fellow.
And I LOVE rich sauces . . .
love to all,
THO
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