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 Darkvision: Prologue & Chapters 1 - 6
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Alaundo
Head Moderator
Admin

United Kingdom
5581 Posts

Posted - 02 Sep 2006 :  17:59:30  Show Profile  Visit Alaundo's Homepage  Click to see Alaundo's MSN Messenger address Send Alaundo a Private Message  Reply with Quote  Delete Topic
Well met

This is a Book Club thread for Darkvision (Book 3 of The Wizards series), by Bruce R. Cordell. Please discuss the prologue and chapters 1 - 6 herein.

Alaundo
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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3525 Posts

Posted - 08 Sep 2006 :  00:13:41  Show Profile  Send The Red Walker a Yahoo! Message Send The Red Walker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The Prologue really sets an interesting tone. It is filled with vivid details. You can almost see the event unfolding!

I feel Bruce did a very nice job conveying the scope of what is happening. I can not wait to read more.

Found the Prologue here: http://www.o-love.net/realms/sam_wiz.html
Thanks O-Love.

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963

Edited by - The Red Walker on 08 Sep 2006 00:18:28
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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3525 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2006 :  05:09:35  Show Profile  Send The Red Walker a Yahoo! Message Send The Red Walker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Two pages into the first chapter and alreadt at least 5 things that grab me and compell me to keep reading. The Vengence Taker is facinating to me, as I have not read that title before. As I see he is after Ususi, it makes me need to know what she could have done that would prompt "Vengence" to be taken out on her.

Even of greater interest to me is his armament. Not being a gamer, three of them are brand new to me, and I only have a feel as to what what a "masterwork" crossbow would be. The dragonfly blade is most intriging with it's concealed "thinblade". The name dragonfly implies switness to me, I am very curious to see what magical properties it posesses, if any. The damos seems very mysterious. I get a sense it must be sphereical, but wonder if it has blades or spines when thrown?

Guess I will have to read on! Great work so far, I'm hooked

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963
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Reader
Acolyte

7 Posts

Posted - 17 Sep 2006 :  17:54:59  Show Profile  Visit Reader's Homepage Send Reader a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm on chapter 8, and a Plangent, a Geomancer, a Vengenace taker and LeShay. Great book so far!
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  01:35:43  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
When I saw that Bruce Cordell would be writing this one, and it was brought to my attention that he already wrote Lady of Poison, I went out and read that book since I had heard that one of the characters from that book would be the lead in this one.

Bruce did a great job in that book for it being only his second novel (I never read Oath of Nerull, so I can't comment on his first novel). It was a very fast paced book, it never got boring, and I honestly have to say that you definately cared for the characters, they were likable, and fun to read. On top of all of that, I liked the Celestial Nadir and its ties to the Imaskari, and I thought that it had tons of potential for future stories.

On the other hand, as much as I enjoyed the book, it had a few quirks. Several times there were "modernisms" that really sounded out of place and killed my suspension of disbelief. While the book moved fast and never dragged, in a few places the paces raced ahead when it could have lingered a bit more to create suspense, and the flash backs of Merrac's happened so quickly and without set up that I got whiplash from them.

I mention that to point out what I have noticed so far in this book.

I really like the way that a its taking more time to unfold some of the mysteries of the characters in the book. Ususi's dreams and her sister, the star elf and her sword, and whatever the thing was that fell into the desert at the begining of the book, it all speaks to keeping the same quick pace as the first book, but yet creating a bit more suspense and mystery as well. We don't even know how all of the characters we have seen at this point will end up in one place.

Cordell is still making charcters that are likeable and interested fairly quickly, which is a good thing when you introduce a diverse cast as he has, and I definately like the idea that when a dwarven wizard is introduced, he specializes in something like geomancy, which is very fitting.

While I am hesitant to learn too much about the Imaskari, I don't blame Cordell for using them, as they are uncharted territory. I've just been so used to them being a mystery for so long, I'm almost afraid to find out about them for fear of ruining some of my own notions of them. That having been said, I like the idea of the LeShay, an ancient and powerful race of fey, having something to do with ancient Imaskari lore rather than the more obvious fiends or the like.


"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Conlon
Learned Scribe

Canada
132 Posts

Posted - 20 Sep 2006 :  02:53:35  Show Profile  Visit Conlon's Homepage Send Conlon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I was on the fence about whether or not to purchase this tome. After just glancing (I don't want to ruin anything for myself!) through these reviews, I believe I'll head out and pick it up.

Many thanks to ye, fellow scribes.

My hopes are ashes, my dreams are dust. All my intentions mean nothing unless they are followed by action.
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Braveheart
Learned Scribe

Austria
159 Posts

Posted - 21 Sep 2006 :  11:01:30  Show Profile  Visit Braveheart's Homepage  Send Braveheart an AOL message  Send Braveheart an ICQ Message Send Braveheart a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The book is great til now (about halfway through), congratulations to Bruce thinking up this star elf, who constantly gets drunk (or is drunk all the time) so she can control her sword better. One of the funniest characters ever!

Jarlaxle: "Do keep ever present in your thoughts, my friend, that an illusion can kill you if you believe in it."
Entreri: "And the real thing can kill you whether you believe in it or not."
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 27 Sep 2006 :  00:27:58  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Another thing I noticed in this section was that when Ususi thinks back to the events of her receiving the keystone, he specifically thinks of the Nentyarch of Yeshelmaar. Now, it could be that she was thinking of him in this manner because he was in Yeshelmaar at the time that she got the keystone, but could it be possible that a year later that the Nentyarch didn't manage to retake Dun-Tharos after the Rotting Man was defeated? After all, he wasn't destroyed, only badly injured and drained of a good deal of energy.

I know, its kind of off topic, but I was just wondering if anyone else noticed this or had any thoughts on this.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Chosen of Moradin
Master of Realmslore

Brazil
1120 Posts

Posted - 27 Sep 2006 :  13:53:37  Show Profile  Visit Chosen of Moradin's Homepage  Click to see Chosen of Moradin's MSN Messenger address Send Chosen of Moradin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I noticed it, too.
Maybe the old Rotting Man have some contingence planes for this moment.

Back on topic, an excellent book, until now. The plangent stuff sound a little sci-fi to me, but it donīt put the read in peril until now.
The vengeance taker is interesting. I see him as a kind of "Bobba Fett" (sp?), and after his battle with the troll and the elves (and that weird creature), I start to became a fan of this guy. And his damos is something very interesting, too.

I really liked of the dwarf geomancer! Itīs a concept interesting, and that idea surprise me and delight me very much!
Iīm eagerly to learn more about the relationship about Thormuld and the star elf, another race that I like. And the sword is very interesting, too. It remember me of Elric, in some moments. The bitternes of a warrior with a powerful weapon always create interesting and intense moments.

Dwarf, DM, husband, and proud of this! :P

twitter: @yuripeixoto
Facebook: yuri.peixoto
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Marc
Senior Scribe

618 Posts

Posted - 12 Nov 2006 :  13:46:07  Show Profile Send Marc a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I really like pictograms and engravings of Imaskari emperors on the walls with planar visitors, the leShay, it's very similar with Sumerian/Akkadian/Babylonian mythological concept, when powerful alien race (or ''gods'') gave the knowledge to them, like Ea/Enki in Sumer.

Though I'm not sure about the demon Mizar (probably a new demon lord, the name comes from the Biblical star) and the centaur-unicorn demon, maybe they are really daemons, which would somehow explain imaskari vs. gods thing

Maybe something resolves later in the book

.
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 12 Nov 2006 :  15:58:47  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I liked the feel of all of those ancient, strange influences on Imaskari. I was also wondering if a few of those demons might not be obyrinth rather than Tanar'ri. For some reason, even though Tanar'ri are plenty old, with potential ties to the Far Realm and ancient knowledge about gods and god like beings, I could see Obyrinth involed. But I like the fact that some of the main influences weren't demons, but arrogant, alien fey.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Marc
Senior Scribe

618 Posts

Posted - 12 Nov 2006 :  19:58:16  Show Profile Send Marc a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm not sure that they were obryth, they all have unusual/grotesque appearance even when comparing them to demons. Maybe demons of ancient past appeared more (like the centaur-unicorn) fey or elvenlike when those civilizations were more prominent on Toril like angels now appear like humans

.
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Rinonalyrna Fathomlin
Great Reader

USA
7106 Posts

Posted - 04 Apr 2007 :  17:37:48  Show Profile  Visit Rinonalyrna Fathomlin's Homepage Send Rinonalyrna Fathomlin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have to admit, when I first read about LeShay in some recent sourcebook, I disliked them as soon as I read how they are supposed to be "like elves, only better!". I've already mentioned how annoying I think the "elves are superior to everyone else at pretty much everything mentality", so how could I like a race that supposedly "one-ups" elves?

Anyway. I just started this novel, and I'm actually surprised at how much I'm enjoying the different major characters, even though I haven't learned THAT much about them yet. They are simply interesting. *shrug* I like protagonists who are archeologists in search of knowledge (like Ususi), and the surly, alcoholic elf also has potential. The simple fact that the elf is female is something different--"dirty" characters like her tend to be male.

My only real issue so far is the info-dumping overkill that took place while Ususi was in her wagon, and I thought the references to Lady of Poison--while slight--came off as forced.

"Instead of asking why we sleep, it might make sense to ask why we wake. Perchance we live to dream. From that perspective, the sea of troubles we navigate in the workaday world might be the price we pay for admission to another night in the world of dreams."
--Richard Greene (letter to Time)
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 04 Apr 2007 :  20:22:00  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I do think that Cordell does a good job coming up with interesting characters, and not interesting in the sense of weird class "game rule" combos, but people that you just kind of wonder how they got where they did. The class/race thing does play into it, but he does like giving his characters "quirks" as well.

I mainly liked the LeShay reference because it was something different. Ancient Empires that learn "Things they should not" usually learn them from fiends or what have you, so powerful fey creatures made it a bit different for me.


"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Rinonalyrna Fathomlin
Great Reader

USA
7106 Posts

Posted - 04 Apr 2007 :  20:32:54  Show Profile  Visit Rinonalyrna Fathomlin's Homepage Send Rinonalyrna Fathomlin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KnightErrantJR

I do think that Cordell does a good job coming up with interesting characters, and not interesting in the sense of weird class "game rule" combos, but people that you just kind of wonder how they got where they did. The class/race thing does play into it, but he does like giving his characters "quirks" as well.

I mainly liked the LeShay reference because it was something different. Ancient Empires that learn "Things they should not" usually learn them from fiends or what have you, so powerful fey creatures made it a bit different for me.


That's a good point. Regardless of what the LeShay are and what I think of them, I've got to admit that at least it's different from the usual "They learned forbidden knowledge from the lower planes!"

I agree with what you said about Cordell's characters, as well.


"Instead of asking why we sleep, it might make sense to ask why we wake. Perchance we live to dream. From that perspective, the sea of troubles we navigate in the workaday world might be the price we pay for admission to another night in the world of dreams."
--Richard Greene (letter to Time)
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