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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 20 Nov 2008 :  04:15:56  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-Two separate books, likely covering the save information.

-And now, back to your regularly scheduled program...

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31689 Posts

Posted - 20 Nov 2008 :  04:36:08  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Actually, looking at both of them now, Freedom In Exile seems more focused on the Dalai Lama's earlier years. My Land and My People is certainly more "recent" in terms of his autobiographical information.

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 20 Nov 2008 :  15:25:09  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"Free Tibet? All right--I'll take it!!!"

[ring, ring]

"Hello, China? I have something you want, but it's gonna cost you . . . that's right--ALL the tea."

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31689 Posts

Posted - 20 Nov 2008 :  22:33:41  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Family Guy fan, eh Erik?

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 21 Nov 2008 :  02:40:26  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
One of the most memorable jokes.

Randomness alert!

For some reason, this post reminds me of one of my favorite little witticisms I shared with my personal trainer the other day:

Q: "You know what your problem is?"

A: "I only have one?"

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30083 Posts

Posted - 21 Nov 2008 :  06:22:37  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I picked up "What the duece?" from Family Guy, and had a couple coworkers at my last job pick it up from me. They also got "Mother of Bob!" and "For the love of Bob!" from me, which was inspired by one of the only worthwhile bits in Mostly Harmless.

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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3524 Posts

Posted - 25 Nov 2008 :  13:34:12  Show Profile  Send The Red Walker a Yahoo! Message Send The Red Walker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie

One of the most memorable jokes.

Randomness alert!

For some reason, this post reminds me of one of my favorite little witticisms I shared with my personal trainer the other day:....





Ah now that was witty!

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 29 Nov 2008 :  23:30:18  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-So far so good, concerning Ghostwalker. I'm only about 100 pages into it, but the antagonists, particularly, I like (The Lord Singer & son). One thing caught my eye, which was an interesting coincidence, because it's somewhat related to my most recent project. Page 90 mentions how Torlic was using an acrobatic fighting style that was Elven in nature to attempt to kill Walker. With that in mind, would you be willing to share more about this style, as in, does it have a name? What kind of "moves" it utilizes? How prevalent is it? Things of this nature...I am in the preplanning stages of turning some thoughts/ideas into an article about Elven fighting styles, so this piqued my interest when I read it.

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 30 Nov 2008 :  03:58:42  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, I'm glad you asked, as I didn't get the chance to go into it in the book, but here we go!

According to Ed, the elves were the first ones to create what we on Earth would call "fencing"--i.e., fighting side-to-side with a light rapier/smallsword/saber/what-have-you, as far back as the Crown Wars. Humans have only recently *rediscovered* what the elves had long since surpassed in favor of the more elegant and "perfect" bladesong ("recently rediscovered" as in, 300 or 400 years ago).

Fencing as a genre of fighting (as I recall according to Ed) is called in the Realms "blade-chime" or "sword-grace," albeit translated into Elvish, so it sounds cooler: kerymvian roughly means "graceful sword," and I would suggest this as a possible elven name for "fencing", or at least one possible school of fencing.

There are literally hundreds, if not thousands of different elven schools of swordplay, from kerymvian to the simple keryth ("war-sword," being the sword style that elven soldiers teach to new recruits, what we'd call "basic training"), to the graceful and elegant kery'faen ("life-sword," which focuses on defense and non-lethal combat--i.e., dealing subdual damage and making your opponent defeat himself without harm), to my favorite mhaor'arkerym ("greatsword of the corruptor"--a style that utilizes two-handed swords and works to wear down an opponent stylishly and with debilitating magic channeled through one's strikes).

Note that elves rarely use two-handed weapons in conjunction with bladesong, though it is not entirely unknown as early as the 14th century. Depending on what elves you ask, two-handed sword-wielders may or may not be *true* bladesingers--most of them are members of the duskblade class. If you're looking ahead to 1479, I imagine the influx of sword-magic styles from Returned Abeir (swordmages using the aegis of assault style) have had some influence on elven bladesong (elf and eladrin swordmages, at least those who live in the mortal realms). Still, most 4e bladesingers use a single one-handed sword and the aegis of shielding style.

These are *genres* of fencing styles, and most individual schools are named after a specific master, such as Natha kerymvian, a dueling style developed by the Nathalans of Evermeet (of which Yldar Nathalan is a practitioner, albeit not a skilled one toward the beginning of his career (in 1362 ["tGT"] he's only about 5th level, though by 1374-5 he's about 16th level).

Torlic's particular style (which does not itself have a name, as it's a bastardization) is self-taught and uniquely developed, but relies heavily on two distinct but related (in that both use the rapier) sword styles:

One is the acrobatic school of sword-dance called kerym syolkiir, which means "shooting star sword," which relies on blasing fast attacks at a distance (similar to what he tries on Walker in the end of the duel). Torlic's style could *almost* be called this, but he lacks the magical element: kerym syolkiir is generally a bladesong style that relies on magic to speed one's movements and heighten one's accuracy (read: haste spell and cat's grace), and it takes a REALLY impressive duelist (like Torlic) to pull the style off unaided.

The other style from which Torlic derived a number of his tricks is called "flash-arrow" (nyr'iolaa) by humans, for its emphasis on "flashy" (Elvish: nyrrt) moves and feints to distract you and lightning fast "arrow" (Elvish: iolaa) thrusts (generally as ripostes to a missed blow) to finish you. (Point of interest: Twilight's sword style borrows largely from nyr'iolaa and her teacher Neveren was a swordmaster of one such school.)

Torlic was not raised among elves and while he picked up some wicked moves from elves he dueled (and defeated, because that's how it works), it would be conceited of him to call his style "elvish" (not that he isn't conceited). He fought duelists who followed both those schools and took the tricks he wanted. If he had actually spent the time with an elven swordmaster who would accept him (his attitude cost him more than one teacher), he would probably be a better duelist.

Tangentially related point of interest: biir-kerym ("junk-sword") is a general term elves use to describe any sword-school they consider inferior to their own (generally speaking, *any* sword-style not taught by elves), and more specifically refers to self-taught swordsmanship. If you learned how to fight by doing, rather than through instruction, your style is biir-kerym, or just generally biir, which is the elven word for "junk" or "crap."

It is considered a *massive* insult to describe your opponent's style as biir-kerym.

Cheers


P.S. I should note that I'm not strictly making up these elvish phrases, though the combinations of words is mine own. The roots come from notes provided me by none other than Steven Schend, noted Realms scholar and helluva guy.

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)

Edited by - Erik Scott de Bie on 04 Mar 2009 06:07:50
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 30 Nov 2008 :  17:56:23  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-...Awe-some!!


(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
4854 Posts

Posted - 30 Nov 2008 :  22:45:34  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Flippin' dragon giblets. That was brilliant Erik. You are the .

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31689 Posts

Posted - 30 Nov 2008 :  23:45:43  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
[David Tennant voice]"Brilliant!"[/voice]

That's hot stuff Erik. And some impressive mental meanderings from Sage Schend too.

Heh. The two of you should collaborate more often.

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 02 Dec 2008 :  00:48:03  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm sure there are hundreds if not thousands of schools of elven fighting out there, but I figure that bladesong styles follow three general genres (like we'd say foil, saber, epee in fencing), determined generally by one's weapon of choice:

- rapier/thinblade, weapon finessible: kerymvian ("graceful sword"). This bladesinger is well represented by the bladesinger PrC, focusing on spells and abilities that take advantage of his high dexterity and enhance mobility.

- longsword/broadsword/etc, not weapon finessible: keryth ("war sword"). Ditto the bladesinger PrC, except this character picks feats that take advantage of a more balanced distribution of abilities and uses spells to enhance strength and fighting prowess.

- two-handed sword (any type): arkerym--great sword. This type of bladesinger is better represented by a straight progression through the duskblade base class, as the PrC bladesinger pretty much requires use of either a longsword or a rapier (or the equivalent).

The two-handed styles limit your spellcasting abilities (because bladesingers can perform their semantic castings with the off-hand), so it is correspondingly the rarest and most difficult style of bladesong. (In mechanical terms, think of the range of spells for duskblades vs. wizard/fighters.)

A two-hander is represented by the duskblade class constructed with a two-handed sword in mind (see Tom and my writeup of Yldar and Cythara Nathalan for substitution levels for elven duskblades: http://www.candlekeep.com/downloads/greater-treasure.zip).

Generally speaking, you can pull off most of the spells a two-hander can do with a one-handed style (i.e., you can be a einhander duskblade, but you're severely hampered if you're a two-handed PrC bladesinger).

The elven courtblade (Races of the Wild) is an exception to these guidelines, and the bladesong style utilizing that particular weapon is a mix of kerymvian and arkerym styles. (The afore-mentioned mhaor'arkerym utilizes a courtblade.)

In 4e FR (for those making the jump), this transitions naturally into the swordmage. Two-handed bladesingers generally choose the aegis of assault and throw themselves entirely into offense, while one-handed bladesingers more often go the traditional path of the coronal guard, with the aegis of shielding ability.

The magic is roughly the same (all swordmages can in theory do the same magic as all other swordmages, so your two-hander isn't limited the way he was in 3e), but that's because magic is different 3e to 4e.

More about biir-kerym:

When I was in high school, my basketball coach always got on the cases of the guys who would go out and shoot hoops all the time and play informal pick-up games for their practice. He called it "jungle ball"--it's not about teamwork or style or finesse but about the individual winning by any means necessary, no matter how graceless or unpolished it looks.

It's a very undisciplined, improvised hodge-podge of skills and techniques coupled with raw enthusiasm, which is essentially what you get if you try and teach yourself to fight. You might be really good (or really lucky) but without formal training, your swordsmanship is biir-kerym. To become a student of a particular school, you'd have to unlearn all that self-taught biir and replace it.

Interestingly, the greatest swordmasters in history (in fact, ALL swordmasters in history) were once deviants who followed no particular school, or at least broke away from one school to found another. Whether your style is considered biir or one of the treasured wonders of elven swordplay depending directly on 1) how successful you are, and 2) how popular you are.

So if you're trying to start a trend or build a school of swordplay patterned after your own unique style, don't neglect that charisma stat . . . or at least befriend a bard or a few.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 02 Dec 2008 :  01:16:49  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Erik, that's just brilliant, seriously.

"Because philosophy arises from awe, a philosopher is bound in his way to be a lover of myths and poetic fables. Poets and philosophers are alike in being big with wonder."--Saint Thomas Aquinas

http://knighterrantjr.blogspot.com/

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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 02 Dec 2008 :  02:10:14  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-Hey, there's more. Even better.

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 02 Dec 2008 :  02:49:02  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys.

I'm a sword enthusiast, so this stuff just rolls right out of me.

Want to know a scimitar-specific bladesong style? How about, N`vae teukerym: "dark moonsword," developed among lady bladesingers sworn to the moon goddess (whoever that happens to be in your Realms)?

Which leads, of course, to N`vae teu'arkerym: "dark moon-greatsword," which is a two-hand style that utilizes a falchion (as defined by D&D 3e+, at least--whether said weapon is really a two-handed scimitar is debatable, but I find it a reasonable approximation).

Dag, feel free to incorporate any or all of this elven swordcraft/bladesong into Elves of Faerun, as you deem appropriate.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 02 Dec 2008 :  05:11:41  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-The lore flows freely tonight!


(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 11 Dec 2008 :  16:50:22  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-I finally finished Ghostwalker. I wrote a review of it here, if you'd like to read it: http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?t=1123329

-One question: Mining for Elven terms, when Arya and the others were sprung from the dungeon they were being held captive in, the individual who freed them- I am presuming that it was Talthaliel- says "Illynthas Shara'tem" when conjuring a light in the dark, damp dungeon. Is this an Elven term (could be Draconic, for example. Don't know), and if so, do you have a translation of it?

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 11 Dec 2008 :  21:50:52  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
That's a really good point, Dags . . . I seem to recall that I had a set meaning in mind, but it was five years ago that I wrote that phrase and don't remember off the top of my head.

It's a command word Talthaliel (yup, Talthaliel) uses to finish a light spell (or activate a light on his staff? Don't remember).

Illy (ily) might be our clue: from ilythiiri, which is the elven subculture from which sprang the drow. That implies "treachery" or "obscurity" or just good-ol' "darkness" (not saying it meant that originally, but the idea is that the Elven language evolved to include that). At least one meaning of "Il" as a syllable (according to the Races of the Wild, however much you trust that source) is "mist" . . . and they define "thas" as being a word associated with harp music or harpers. Thus "Illynthas" might be something like "song in the gloom."

When it comes to "Shara'tem," you're looking at "sha" (a word for sun, quite appropriate for a light spell), "ra" (which probably came from "ran," which is a word for binding) and "tem," which is a spinner or person who weaves. Thus "Shara'tem" means "weave sun-binding."

Picture Talthy saying it in a sing-songy Elvish accent (eel-EEN-thas shah-RA-tehm), and all in all, one possible meaning of the phrase is: "by this song in the gloom, I weave a binding for the sun."

Of course, I might have been going for something else entirely.

In other news, thanks for the review! I'm glad you generally liked the novel, and I'm pleased you liked Greyt. He was one of my favorite characters as well--I particularly enjoyed writing him as fairly morally ambiguous.

Reading your review, I suspect you'll like Downshadow quite a bit. Could be wrong, but hey--that's my guess.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 11 Dec 2008 :  21:56:55  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I read that you liked Depths a bit, Dags--have you posted a review of that one anywhere?

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  17:22:17  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-Thank you for the pseudo-Elven.

quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie

I read that you liked Depths a bit, Dags--have you posted a review of that one anywhere?

Cheers



-No, I haven't. Since I started writing reviews (I don't particularly know why, either. Nothing better to do, I suppose), I've only been using novels that I have recently read. So, all of the things that I've reviewed thus far were either things that I just recently read, or recently reread. I don't want to potentially comment on things that the haze of time has ripened or ruined in my mind. That said, I was commenting that, with the completion of this book, I have no other Forgotten Realms books to read, currently. I am reading a Darth Bane: Rule of Two[i/], and [i]The Third Eye, but I normally read two or three books concurrently anyway. I might pick that one up again.

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium

Edited by - Lord Karsus on 12 Dec 2008 17:22:59
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D-brane
Learned Scribe

United Kingdom
140 Posts

Posted - 12 Dec 2008 :  23:32:27  Show Profile  Visit D-brane's Homepage Send D-brane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dagnirion

I am reading a Darth Bane: Rule of Two[i/], and [i]The Third Eye, but I normally read two or three books concurrently anyway. I might pick that one up again.
Can I ask . . . How do you manage to read more than one book at a time? It is a weird question I know, but I have tried to do this myself many times and have often met with defeat.

Any tips for those interested in borrowing such a skill?

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence."

Edited by - D-brane on 12 Dec 2008 23:33:11
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  01:32:30  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm not Dags, and the question was posed at him, but I'll answer anyway, 'cuz it's my scroll (nyah!).

Aside from being able to compartmentalize (reserve thoughts about differen subjects for different parts of your conscious mind), I can generally read two or more books at the same time in a certain set of circumstances, not all of which but at least one has to be true:

1) The books are very different, genre-wise/thematically: I can read a sci-fi and a fantasy, or a biography and a spy thriller, but I can't read a Martin book and a Erikson book, for instance, at the same time.

2) I read the books in vastly different locations: One is my work book, to be read on bathroom/coffee/rest breaks (Swords of Dragonfire) and one is to be read at home/before I go to sleep at night (Kavalier and Clay). Also, these books are very different genre-wise (see #1), even if they're both technically fantasy.

3) One is assigned reading: I can always read assigned reading separately from pleasure reading. And usually that makes me read more for pleasure, as pleasure reading is a relaxation.

Cheers


Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
2885 Posts

Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  04:46:05  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
:: Casts Karsus' Avatar, targeted at ESDB's scroll ::

-How do I do it? I don't know. It's not something that I "trained" myself to do, or anything. I started the habit about a month or so ago. My birthday is in October, and for my gifts, I got $100 in total in Barnes & Noble gift cards. In a single trip, I spent most of that, and picked up six or seven books that I was interested in. I began reading one, then, during a trip where I knew I was going to be waiting in the car, I accidentally grabbed another- but started reading it concurrently, of course. And, continue, and there you go.

-It's a habit that I might have picked up during high school, maybe. You know, in English class, you have books that you need to read, as Erik alluded to, and those books are invariably never Forgotten Realms books, so I'd have to read those, plus my Forgotten Realms books, so...

:: Karsus' Avatar ends, and I die. Again. ::

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium

Edited by - Lord Karsus on 13 Dec 2008 04:47:08
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 13 Dec 2008 :  05:18:58  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I tend to do the same thing, though I'm using only reading one novel at a time. Usually I have a single novel that I'm reading, plus at least one magazine or game book. The game books I usually read when I've only got a couple minutes, or when I'm retreating to my "reading room". The novel I read just about any other time.

Right now, I'm reading Heir to the Empire, Warmachine: Superiority, Ptolus, and Love Hina the Novel Volume 2. I'm mostly focused on the first two.

Oh, and though I've fallen out of the habit of late, I also read manga when I'm on my exercise bike.

Now what I thought was weird was what my friend Gino used to do: he'd be reading two different places in the same novel at once! He'd read a chapter or two, put in his bookmark, and then immediately resume reading several chapters later!

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