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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 01 May 2012 :  10:56:13  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

I'm going to have to beg everyone's forgiveness on this bit. For the life of me, I can't recall if I'm remembering an unused idea or an idea I worked in somewhere. At least the write-up is new. ;-)

===
The Fallen Kings

A recurring legend recounted by bards from Waterdeep to the Way Inn speaks of the Fallen Kings who vanished “ere the collapse of the Fallen Kingdom” and “may someday return to restore their throne.” Such tales are never particularly precise as to which Fallen Kingdom or which monarch they refer or why said kings vanished before the collapse of their respective kingdoms yet seek to restore a realm long since vanished.
Most scholars believe that the enduring popularity of such tales suggests nothing more than a deeply held longing to restore a golden era now long lost. However, a handful of sages believe there might well be some truth to such legends. In particular, such sages point to the disappearances of Laranla Imdalace of Ardeep, Laranlor Ellatharion of Phalorm, and Arcrown Bharaun “the Younger” Ironstar, as possible “Fallen Kings” whose fates have never been determined.
The only tantalizing hint that “the Fallen Kings” might yet survive lies in a fragementary account from the runestone of a dwarven prospector who explored the subterranean depths of the Forlorn Hills in the waning days of Arcrown Devin’s reign. The broken runestone now lies forgotten in the depths of Mount Illefarn, lost during the assault by the Black Horde, but once was a matter of some concern for the last Arcrown of Dardath.
The prospector’s account speaks of a dark river, which he calls the River Gloaming, which runs through the depths of the Forlorn Hills, roughly parallel to the course of the River Shining along the surface. The carver of the runestone claims to have found a crystalline cavern hidden behind a subterranean waterfall in which a strange creature with a coiling black and silver body, three heads, and nine hands (presumably a sharn) was imprisoned within a massive geode. The sharn, if that’s what it was, called itself Phalorm the Tri-Crowned. It claimed to seek the restoration of the Fallen Kingdoms it once ruled. The author fled the seemingly mad creature, but there is no record as to his fate or how the runestone he carved made its way to Runedardath.

===

Is there just the one runestone, Eric, or does the possibility exist, as you see it, for other carved stones recording accounts from the Fallen Kingdom?



I'm sure there are other carved runestones witha accounts from the Fallen Kingdom. As for this story, there may just be the one runestone (that's what I intended for this story), but there could easily be others (if that works better for your campaign).

--
http://www.ericlboyd.com/dnd/
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13395 Posts

Posted - 01 May 2012 :  17:06:25  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There is another odd 'rune stone' thingy in one of Steven Schend's Lands of Intrigue books (all of them, not the ones that just came in that box).

I can't remember which or where, or the specific details (something to do with the ancient Elven Kingdom in the Wealdath?), but I recall the premise was VERY cool - the stone was shaped like a pyramid, and so cryptic no-one could read it... until someone discovered it had to be viewed from above (brilliant on Mr.Shend's part!)

I believed it was something created by both dwarves and elves together, but I'm not sure. Regardless, I can see other stones like that existing wherever demi-humans held lands together in the distant past, so it is plausible to find one in the region of The Fallen Kingdom/Phalorm/Illefarn.


"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 01 May 2012 :  22:17:00  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I redid this character detailed in Volo's Guide to the Sword Coast to that the rumors were more truthful.

Hopefully this is consistent with known lore on the Hothemer clan. I couldn't find anything to contradict it, but it's easy to miss a reference to a Waterdhavian noble family.

Ulmyn Andalor
=============
Ulmyn Andalor (NG doppelganger spellthief CAdv 2, appears to be NG male Tethyrian human commoner 6, see Appendix 2, page __) appears to be an affable, portly man with a curly white beard and a bald pate who goes about covered with sawdust. Ulmyn takes pleasure in efficiency, and can identify both common and exotic woods better than most carpenters. He makes his living as a miller in the roadside hamlet of Bowshot, north of the Way Inn, and his sawmill is always busy. Ulmyn, who never seems to sleep, can be seen trotting about night and day, covered with sawdust, overseeing a large staff in turning out cheap, plentiful cut lumber for sale in Waterdeep and Daggerford.
A successful Gather Information check (DC 15) reveals the following: Ulmyn was once a guard for the Hothemer family in Waterdeep and fled to Bowshot after an affair with the beautiful daughter whose bodyguard he was—an affair that produced a child now heir to the family fortunes. Ulmyn was supposedly paid handsomely to go away and renounce all claim to a place in the family. This payment is said to have subsequently grown into a sizable fortune. Some say Ulmyn is less simple than he appears, and has survived several assassination attempts sponsored by Hothemer clan by a combination of anticipation, battle prowess, and hidden magical items always kept ready on his person. Other folk whisper that Ulmyn is only a human shape worn by a powerful, possibly evil, creature.
There is something to the rumors that Ulmyn is not what he appears, but the truth is not what anyone would expect. Ulmyn is actually a good-aligned doppelganger named Vixilophar, once a member of the Ulithdarae (the druuth led by the illithid Ulithdaraeyl and based in the Crypt of the Worm). In the Year of the Bright Blade (1347 DR), when the Company of Six Swords invaded the Crypt of the Worm, the doppelganger now known as Ulmyn betrayed its illithid master, allowing the brave adventurers to prevail. In thanks for its assistance, the Six Swords helped the doppelganger escape the dungeon alive, and one of them, a Waterdhavian noble named Cynthnya Hothemer, second daughter of Lord Malas Hothemer, offered it employment as her personal bodyguard.
One thing led to another, until, in the Year of the Bridle (1349 DR), Ulmyn became the secret father of a changelingMM3. Once the nature of the new baby was revealed, Lord Malas Hothemer was outraged, and immediately hired a diviner to reveal the bastard’s father. Only the pleadings of his eldest daughter, Lady Chynna Hothemer, dissuaded Lord Malas from killing the baby’s father on the spot. Instead, the doppelganger was given a small fortune in exchange for renouncing any claim to a place in the family. The doppelganger fled south, along the Trade Way, until, by chance, it encountered the gravely wounded Ulmyn, nearly crushed by a massive tree. Impressed by the doppelganger’s efforts to comfort him in his dying moments, Ulmyn suggested that the doppelganger assume his identity, and the doppelganger quickly asserted himself as a prominent citizen of Bowshot.
In the Year of the Morningstar (1350 DR), after having been quickly married off to a scion in the Husteem family, Cynthnya Hothemer died in childbirth, and her second offspring was stillborn, leaving only the changeling to inherit the family title among Lord Malas’ heirs. (Her elder sister Chynna Hothemer is apparently barren.) Fearing his branch of the family might lose control of the lordship, should his grandson’s true nature be revealed, Lord Malas Hothemer once again hired diviners to track down the errant doppelganger. Once Ulmyn’s true nature was determined, Lord Malas began hiring assassins to kill the doppelganger. So far, Ulmyn has fought off all attempts to take his life, but the Hothemer clan’s efforts to cleanse the family tree are growing bolder by the month.

--
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31687 Posts

Posted - 02 May 2012 :  01:48:15  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

I'm going to have to beg everyone's forgiveness on this bit. For the life of me, I can't recall if I'm remembering an unused idea or an idea I worked in somewhere. At least the write-up is new. ;-)

===
The Fallen Kings

A recurring legend recounted by bards from Waterdeep to the Way Inn speaks of the Fallen Kings who vanished “ere the collapse of the Fallen Kingdom” and “may someday return to restore their throne.” Such tales are never particularly precise as to which Fallen Kingdom or which monarch they refer or why said kings vanished before the collapse of their respective kingdoms yet seek to restore a realm long since vanished.
Most scholars believe that the enduring popularity of such tales suggests nothing more than a deeply held longing to restore a golden era now long lost. However, a handful of sages believe there might well be some truth to such legends. In particular, such sages point to the disappearances of Laranla Imdalace of Ardeep, Laranlor Ellatharion of Phalorm, and Arcrown Bharaun “the Younger” Ironstar, as possible “Fallen Kings” whose fates have never been determined.
The only tantalizing hint that “the Fallen Kings” might yet survive lies in a fragementary account from the runestone of a dwarven prospector who explored the subterranean depths of the Forlorn Hills in the waning days of Arcrown Devin’s reign. The broken runestone now lies forgotten in the depths of Mount Illefarn, lost during the assault by the Black Horde, but once was a matter of some concern for the last Arcrown of Dardath.
The prospector’s account speaks of a dark river, which he calls the River Gloaming, which runs through the depths of the Forlorn Hills, roughly parallel to the course of the River Shining along the surface. The carver of the runestone claims to have found a crystalline cavern hidden behind a subterranean waterfall in which a strange creature with a coiling black and silver body, three heads, and nine hands (presumably a sharn) was imprisoned within a massive geode. The sharn, if that’s what it was, called itself Phalorm the Tri-Crowned. It claimed to seek the restoration of the Fallen Kingdoms it once ruled. The author fled the seemingly mad creature, but there is no record as to his fate or how the runestone he carved made its way to Runedardath.

===

Is there just the one runestone, Eric, or does the possibility exist, as you see it, for other carved stones recording accounts from the Fallen Kingdom?



I'm sure there are other carved runestones witha accounts from the Fallen Kingdom. As for this story, there may just be the one runestone (that's what I intended for this story), but there could easily be others (if that works better for your campaign).

Do you have some notion of where these other runestones might be scattered?

I've my own ideas, but I'm interested to see just how far the influence of Fallen Kingdom knowledge might have spread.

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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 02 May 2012 :  02:12:51  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
So, in general, I assume they follow the same pattern as the runestones of other Realms, as outlined in FR11 - Dwarves Deep, page 11.

This would suggest that the Forlorn Hills are littered with them, as there are dwarfholds, abandoned dwarfholds, and crypts galore throughout the Forlorn Hills.

Phalorm also encompassed Hunnabar (I think that was the name), the southern dwarven duchy centered on Kanalgym. (Again, going from memory.) So lots on that area.

When Phalorm and later Dardath collapsed, the dwarves scattered to human cities around the North, so some of Phalorm's stones would have been taken as far north as the Silver Marches and as far south as the cities along the River Chionthar.

During the height of Dardath, the dwarves carved stonework for elves, humans, halflings and gnomes all about the realm, and probably left their "fingerprints" all over, so you'd find runestones cleverly hidden in elven architecture in Ardeep to the throne room of the Duchy of Daggerford. Some of the decorative elements of arcthiecture were then reused in noble halls from Waterdeep to Amn.

Finally, the dwarves of Dardath did a lot of dying. Everywhere from the High Forest to the Mere of Dead Men to the barrens of the High Moor, so you'd find runestones all over.

And finally, they are are always portsl, so a handful of runestones might have scattered further afield.

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

I'm going to have to beg everyone's forgiveness on this bit. For the life of me, I can't recall if I'm remembering an unused idea or an idea I worked in somewhere. At least the write-up is new. ;-)

===
The Fallen Kings

A recurring legend recounted by bards from Waterdeep to the Way Inn speaks of the Fallen Kings who vanished “ere the collapse of the Fallen Kingdom” and “may someday return to restore their throne.” Such tales are never particularly precise as to which Fallen Kingdom or which monarch they refer or why said kings vanished before the collapse of their respective kingdoms yet seek to restore a realm long since vanished.
Most scholars believe that the enduring popularity of such tales suggests nothing more than a deeply held longing to restore a golden era now long lost. However, a handful of sages believe there might well be some truth to such legends. In particular, such sages point to the disappearances of Laranla Imdalace of Ardeep, Laranlor Ellatharion of Phalorm, and Arcrown Bharaun “the Younger” Ironstar, as possible “Fallen Kings” whose fates have never been determined.
The only tantalizing hint that “the Fallen Kings” might yet survive lies in a fragementary account from the runestone of a dwarven prospector who explored the subterranean depths of the Forlorn Hills in the waning days of Arcrown Devin’s reign. The broken runestone now lies forgotten in the depths of Mount Illefarn, lost during the assault by the Black Horde, but once was a matter of some concern for the last Arcrown of Dardath.
The prospector’s account speaks of a dark river, which he calls the River Gloaming, which runs through the depths of the Forlorn Hills, roughly parallel to the course of the River Shining along the surface. The carver of the runestone claims to have found a crystalline cavern hidden behind a subterranean waterfall in which a strange creature with a coiling black and silver body, three heads, and nine hands (presumably a sharn) was imprisoned within a massive geode. The sharn, if that’s what it was, called itself Phalorm the Tri-Crowned. It claimed to seek the restoration of the Fallen Kingdoms it once ruled. The author fled the seemingly mad creature, but there is no record as to his fate or how the runestone he carved made its way to Runedardath.

===

Is there just the one runestone, Eric, or does the possibility exist, as you see it, for other carved stones recording accounts from the Fallen Kingdom?



I'm sure there are other carved runestones witha accounts from the Fallen Kingdom. As for this story, there may just be the one runestone (that's what I intended for this story), but there could easily be others (if that works better for your campaign).

Do you have some notion of where these other runestones might be scattered?

I've my own ideas, but I'm interested to see just how far the influence of Fallen Kingdom knowledge might have spread.


--
http://www.ericlboyd.com/dnd/
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Rhewtani
Senior Scribe

USA
508 Posts

Posted - 03 May 2012 :  03:12:08  Show Profile  Send Rhewtani an AOL message Send Rhewtani a Private Message  Reply with Quote
RE: Redeye

I played in a FR campaign that had been going for about 20 years real time before I got there. A mix of "young DMing" from years ago and various PC actions had left the world in what I considered a bit of a mess when I joined in (if there was a good npc and he was useful, he was probably dead ... like when you get to Curse of the Azure Bonds and the group is supposed to get aid from Filani ... and oops, a PC got her killed two years back). So, I from a meta-perspective I was using all of my various PCs to clean things back up. One was situation in Daggerford and ended up appointed Sentinel of the Lizard Marsh. Redeye was a bit of a pain to deal with diplomatically, since he had ... you know ... met PCs before and was a bit wary. Nonetheless, I remember him fondly. And when his lizardfolk had dreams of an ancient lizard king calling to them, who helped them recover three nether scrolls, contracting mummy rot, and losing about half a dozen human allies in the process? Oh yes, scaly windbag owes me.
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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 03 May 2012 :  06:41:20  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Updated to standard Magic Item Compendium format, from Lords of Darkness.

Tome of the Dragon
==================
Price (Item Level): 20,000 gp (15th)
Body Slot: — (held)
Caster Level: 6th
Aura: Moderate; (DC 11) abjuration
Activation: Standard (command)
Weight: 8 lb.

The tome is a thick stack of 300 vellum pages bound together inside a cover made of cured red dragon hide. The symbol of the Cult of the Dragon appears in gilt on the front cover.

The Cult of the Dragon possesses a sacred book, written by Sammaster First-Speaker himself, entitled Tome of the Dragon. The Cult has made several copies of the original, and most cells have their own copy kept in the possession of its Wearers of the Purple. All members of the Cult are expected to guard their cell’s copy of the Tome of the Dragon with their lives, if necessary.
Effect: The tome (the original and presumably the copies) contains details on all the insane archmage’s research in creating dracoliches. It also holds the complete text of his prophecies regarding the fate of Toril, the reign of the undead dragons, and the role of the Cult in administering the new world order. The tome details the process that must be followed to turn a dragon into a dracolich.
The tome contains the following spells:
0—disrupt undead, touch of fatigue
1—cause fear, chill touch, ray of enfeeblement
2—blindness/deafness, command undead, false life, ghoul touch, scare, spectral hand
3—gentle repose, halt undead, ray of exhaustion, vampiric touch
4—aggravate dracorageDoF, animate dead, bestow curse, contagion, enervation, fear
5—blight, magic jar, symbol of pain, waves of fatigue
6—circle of death, create undead, eyebite, symbol of fear, undeath to death
7—control undead, finger of death, symbol of weakness, waves of exhaustion
8—clone, create greater undead, horrid wilting, symbol of death
9—astral projection, energy drain, soul bind, wail of the banshee
The book is written in a cipher invented by Sammaster, requiring a Decipher Script (DC 30) check to decrypt. The solution to the code is one of the Cult’s most closely guarded secrets, and only the Wearers of the Purple are permitted to learn it.
Hardness 4; hp 11.
Resistant (Minor): The Tome of the Dragon has resistance 5 against acid, cold, electricity, and fire attacks.
Prerequisites: Craft Wondrous Item, endure elements.
Cost to Create: 500 gp (plus 350 gp for tome and 19,900 gp for spell materials), 40 XP, 43 days.

--
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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 05 May 2012 :  01:59:14  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Note, I haven't promised not to change drafts previously posted. As you'll note here, Trellik Wyrmtongue is gone, replaced by Torleth Mindulspeer. Same function, but more closely tied into the existing Realmslore. Also note that Torleth is a darker version of the character presented in VGttSC, emphasizing the much darker nature hinted at in Volo's write-up.

The Wormridden
==============
The Circle of Rust and the Worm is a Talassan cabal of crazed sages and mystic spellcasters of assorted disciplines, both religious and secular, intent on bringing about the end of the world by natural forces and the inherent instability of civilization. The group’s name refers to the unstoppable destruction inflicted on living things and their creations by the passage of time, symbolized by the rust that assails sword and shield and maggots that break down flesh. Although the faith of Talos is most commonly associated with the destructive force of nature, including storms, earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and the like, the efforts of the Rustworms, as members are known, to bring about destruction on a longer timescale have won the Destroyer’s favor as well. Some members of the Circle of Rust and the Worm seek to destroy Faerun through the unleashing of some great long-lasting cataclysm, while others focus their efforts on destroying the hallmarks of civilization, leaving a legacy of fallen kingdoms in their wake.
The Circle of Rust and the Worm has an active presence in the Open Marches south of Daggerford, under the leadership of a Rustworm named Torleth Mindulspeer (see below), proprietor of Torleth’s Treasures in Gillian’s Hill. Unbeknownst to his fellow villagers, Torleth leads a group of bandits based in heart of the Sword Hills. The bandits, who call themselves the Swords of the Worm, serve as Torleth’s mailed fist, allowing him to attack and plunder passing caravans bearing unusual trophies. Such trophies inevitably make their way into his shop after passing through several less-than-trustworthy hands.
Torleth is also served by a variety of individuals who spy on his behalf. The Wormeyes, as Torleth calls them, include such notable spies as Arayndar Delimbiyr (see below), a captain in the Daggerford militia, who keeps Torleth informed of ongoings in Daggerford (and thus all the PCs’ exploits that are reported back to Sherlen), Dygath Hornspar (see below), Baron Cromm’s huntmaster, who engineers the lizardfolk raid on Redhand Keep (see Mission #1), and Lyandra of Scornubel, a serving wench at the Way Inn, who alerts Torleth to the rare map carried by Meldar Farwander (see Mission #3).
Collectively, Torleth, the Swords of the Worm, and the Wormeyes make up the Wormridden, the local cell of the Circle of Rust and the Worm.

--
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TBeholder
Master of Realmslore

1381 Posts

Posted - 06 May 2012 :  03:45:30  Show Profile Send TBeholder a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

Crypt of the Worm
=================
[...] Once known as the Tomb of the Doomsayer, the crypt was fashioned in secret by worshipers of Kozah (Talos) after the death of the last of the Doomsayers, an ancient Netherese order dedicated to the destruction of Netheril’s great cities, in the Year of Unfurled Sails (-670 DR). Unlike most tombs of its era, the body of the last Doomsayer was left on an open slab at the heart of the crypt and sprinkled with maggots to quickly consume it, symbolizing the Kozahyn belief that destruction comes to all in good time.
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

The Wormridden
==============
The Circle of Rust and the Worm is a Talassan cabal of crazed sages and mystic spellcasters of assorted disciplines, both religious and secular, intent on bringing about the end of the world by natural forces and the inherent instability of civilization.
Hm, this comes across as more of Moander/Doomguard thing. The latter, as Moanderite variation of Emerald Enclave.
But... isn't Talos about more showy destruction? Of course, it makes sense that after Time of Troubles and Moander's death Talos could actively encroach upon any unused destruction-related portfolio. But wasn't old time Kozah was even more of "Kozah smash!!1"? So, if they wanted a corpse destroyed (double so, someone of their own), they'd simply leave on a hilltop, call clouds if there's none already and stand somewhere nearby to watch fireworks, no?

People never wonder How the world goes round -Helloween
And even I make no pretense Of having more than common sense -R.W.Wood
It's not good, Eric. It's a gazebo. -Ed Whitchurch
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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 06 May 2012 :  12:23:35  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
@TBeholder: All good points. However, the Circle of rust and the Worm is described as such in Faiths & Avatars, so I'm buidling off that. I'm viewing it as a somewhat of a Talassan Heresy (as described in Powers of Faerun) ... it doesn't totally fit the god's normal depiction, yet he seems to support it nonetheless.

To me the point of the cabal is not that destruction can't come quickly ... it's that destruction is inevitable, at least over some period of time.

--Eric

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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 08 May 2012 :  18:26:07  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Inspired by brief note in Volo’s Guide to the Sword Coast, page 216.

Delfen’s Wareward
=================
Abjuration
Level: Sor/Wiz 4
Components: V, S, F
Casting Time: 1 minute
Range: Personal or Touch#8232;
Duration: 1 hour/level
Saving Throw: None or Will negates (harmless)
Spell Resistance: No or Yes (harmless)

This spell has two uses, depending on whether the target is yourself or another creature.
Personal: You name up to 1 creature (Intelligence 3 or greater) per level. You select up to 1 magic item carried on your person per level. If you are wounded or if a selected magic item is removed from your person, every named creature within 1 mile of your person (as well as yourself) is alerted by a mental alarm. Everyone so alerted notes a single mental “ping” that awakens them from normal sleep but does not otherwise disturb concentration. A silence spell has no effect on a mental alarm.
Creature: Your spell targets single creature (Intelligence 3 or greater) touched by you. You select up to 1 magic item per level carried by the target and known to you. If the target creature is wounded or if a selected magic item is removed from their person and if you are within 1 mile of their person, you are notified by a mental alarm. You note a single mental “ping” that awakens you from normal sleep but does not otherwise disturb concentration. A silence spell has no effect on a mental alarm.
Arcane Focus: A tiny bell and a piece of very fine silver wire.

--
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ericlboyd
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
1253 Posts

Posted - 10 May 2012 :  15:12:58  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Shining Baronies
================
Along the periphery of the Duchy of Daggerford are seven nominally independent baronies, all of which can trace their investiture back to the Realm of Three Crowns, the Kingdom of Man, or the splinter kingdoms that arose in the wake of Delimbiyran’s collapse. Individual barons may claim additional titles (e.g. several claim the title of King of Man), but most are commonly accorded the rank of baron and collectively known the Shining Barons.
Although nominally independent, none of the Shining Baronies are strong enough to survive without maintaining a strong defensive and trading alliance with the Duke of Daggerford, with the possible exception of Delantar and Floshin Estates. Such ties were further strengthened during the Dragonspear War, when soldiers in the employ of the various Shining Barons formed companies under the banner of the Duke of Daggerford. The Shining Barons and the Duke of Daggerford collectively make up the Council of Man, a forum for adjudicating disputes between realms and acting with common purpose against foes of the Lawkeeper races. Although the Duke of Daggerford or any of the Shining Barons may call for a convening of the Council of Man, the Duke of Daggerford traditionally chairs all such councils.
The current roster of Shining Barons includes:
• Baron Cromm Redhand (CG male Illuskan human fighter 3, see Mission 1) of Tavboryn, which encompasses the rolling hills along the eastern edge of the Lizard Marsh;
• Baron Targarth Longhorn of Ardeepsward (NG male Illuskan human ranger 1/knight 1), which encompasses the lightly wooded open land between the Ardeep Forest and the Sea of Swords;
• Lord Elorfindar Floshin of Floshin Estates (see Chapter 2), which encompasses the open lands between the town of Daggerford and Ardeep Forest;
• High Knight Indigar Loravatha of Loravtha (LN male Illuskan human knight 3), which encompasses a winding, narrow valley in the northwestern Forlorn Hills, including the famous ruin known as the Crumbling Stair;
• Baron Agwain Delantar (CN male Illuskan human __, see Mission 3) of Delantar, which encompasses the lands along the northern bank of the River Delimbiyr between Julkoun and Secomber;
• Baroness Taera Shimmerstar of Starnaer (CG female half-wood-elf ranger 3), which encompasses the verdant vale between the Sword Hills and the Misty Forest, south of the River Delimibyr;
• Baron-in-Waiting Nanthar Harcourt of Vaelendaer (LN male Tethyrian human knight 3), which once encompassed the lands north of Dragonspear Castle, in the crook of land between the Misty Forest and the High Moor, but has not been settled for two centuries or more.

Most of the Shining Barons command little more than a crumbling keep and a handful of hamlets. While they are accorded some measure of respect in the Lower Delimbiyr Vale, their titles would get them little more than spit in their drink in most taverns in the City of Splendors. The baron-in-waiting of Vaelendaer now commands the soldiers defending on the Way Inn on behalf of the Lords’ Alliance.


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Edited by - ericlboyd on 10 May 2012 16:54:19
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crazedventurers
Master of Realmslore

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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  16:16:45  Show Profile  Visit crazedventurers's Homepage Send crazedventurers a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

Shining Baronies.....



now this is excellent! small slices of Realmslore that can easily be picked up and transported to the Shield Wall Barons of Cormyr, or outlying baronies in Tethyr etc.

A question if I may Eric - do they need to be recognised by the incumbent Duke of Daggerford for legitimacy? or can any sword swinger who takes over be recognised as the Baron/Baroness of Starnaer (for instance)?

excellent piece Eric - more like this is always welcome

Cheers

Damian

So saith Ed. I've never said he was sane, have I?
Gods, all this writing and he's running a constant fantasy version of Coronation Street in his head, too. .
shudder,
love to all,
THO
Candlekeep Forum 7 May 2005

Edited by - crazedventurers on 10 May 2012 16:17:16
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Jeremy Grenemyer
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  16:26:50  Show Profile Send Jeremy Grenemyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good stuff. Baroness Taera Shimmerstar caught my eye. Is she in any way related to Valantha Shimmerstar of Cormyr?

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ericlboyd
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  16:49:50  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Question #1: Do they need to be recognised by the incumbent Duke of Daggerford for legitimacy? or can any sword swinger who takes over be recognised as the Baron/Baroness of Starnaer (for instance)?

I would say they need to be recognized by a local herald (name / office unknown), although having the backing of the duke would certainly be a most practical step. By chance, the current holder of the High Herald office of Black Visor is Ghelimar Firefrostarr (NG hm F11), who resides in Black Helm Tower, a own fortified compound near Daggerford. His approval would certainly be expected.

Question #2: Is she in any way related to Valantha Shimmerstar of Cormyr?

I would say possible, but not assured. There are a fair number of "shared" noble names between the Waterdeep region and Cormyr, suggesting distant family ties between the two regions are not uncommon. (I like reusing noble names from one to the other to suggest such distant ties, and did that here as well.)

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ericlboyd
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  16:51:46  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here's the 3.5e write-up I did for the CoS:W web enhancement:

Black Helm Tower
This fortified compound squats atop a low hill a day’s ride north and east of Daggerford. It is home to Ghelimar Firefrostarr (NG male Tethyrian human bard 1/fighter 10), current holder of the Black Vizor office of the High Heralds. Ghelimar is rarely in attendance, as the office requires much traveling and magically assisted communications. Black Visor is deeply involved in current politics of western Faerûn, keeping track of intrigues, changing attitudes, treaties, and shifting balances of power. He also keeps records of all formal declarations of war and peace treaties, and reports on their fulfillment to the Heralds, the Lords’ Alliance, and the Merchants’ League. Ghelimar does give audiences when he is in residence, but he is careful not to undercut the office of Falconfree (see City of Splendors: Waterdeep) in Waterdeep, currently held by Scirkhel Wands.

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ericlboyd
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  18:18:51  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
History of Daggerford
=====================
During the era of Delimbiyran, the Daggerford region was known as the Duchy of Calandor, and encompassed the rich heartlands of the Kingdom of Man.
In the Year of the Triton’s Horn (697 DR), worshipers of Shar rioted throughout the Sword Coast as the machinations of Lalondra, the Dark Mother, sweep away the power of the Dark Goddess clergy overnight. King Davyd of the Kingdom of Man died in the tumult without an heir, and several kingdoms—including Calandor, Scathril, and Loravatha—broke away. The royal seat of Delimibiyran retained its independence, but was closely allied with the duchy of Calandor, which encircled it.
In the Year of the Clutching Death (702 DR), orc raiders from the High Forest inflicted heavy losses on the splinter kingdoms of Delimbiyran that were formerly part of the Kingdom of Man. Many of these lesser realms were destroyed before the armies of the Duke of Calandor finally defeated the orcs.
In the Year of Doom (714 DR), during the Battle of Two Gates’ Fall in the Weeping War, the city of Delimbiyran and much of the lower Delimbiyr Vale were devastated by a magical explosion resulting from the destruction of the Warrior’s Gate—a portal in Myth Drannor. Many of Delimbiyran’s remaining splinter kingdoms began to sink into decline. Although the duke of Calendor claimed Delimbiyran as his ducal seat and promised to rebuild, this also began a precipitous decline in the fortunes of the Duchy of Calandor that have never been reversed.
In the Year of the Curse (882 DR), moon elf refugees from Eaerlann resettled Ardeep and rebuilt the realm. A brief alliance with the humans dwelling along the Delimbiyr, including the Duchy of Calandor, and the dwarves of Dardath foundered because of lingering suspicions about the role of humans in the fall of Ascalhorn. Like Phalorm, this alliance was dubbed the Fallen Kingdom, much to the confusion of later historians.
In the Year of the Hurled Axe (928 DR), the reigning duke of Calandor attempted to reestablish the Kingdom of Man and have himself crowned King of Delimbiyran, but his efforts were undermined by the unwillingness of the surrounding realms to bend to his rule. One small benefit of this effort was the establishment of the Council of Man, a deliberative body composed of the local noble rulers and chaired by the Duke fo Calendor to address and resolve disputes amongst the lordlings of the lower Delimbiyr Vale.
In the Year of the Penitent Rogue (931 DR), a wagon master from Baldur’s Gate sent his son, named Tyndal, ahead of the family wagon one evening to locate a safe passage across the River Delimbiyr. The boy, named Tyndal located the ford, but was surprised and attacked by a party of lizardfolk. The lad slew six of the creatures with his only weapon, a dagger, and held off the rest until reinforcements from the merchant caravan arrived.
Unbeknownst to his father, Tyndal discovered a king’s tear, depicting Morlin Castle at its height, and a sack of ancient coins in a sack carried by the leader of the lizardfolk, suggesting they were returning from an expedition into the ruins. After the caravan reached Waterdeep, Tyndal returned to explore the ruins with some of his companions. After repeated forays into the ruins, Tyndal emerged a rich man and a hero among the people. With his newfound wealth, he quickly came to own large swaths of land and numerous caravan companies in Calandor.
By the Year of the Foolish Bridegroom (945 DR), Tyndal, who adopted the surname “Daggerford,” sought and received permission to marry the aging duke of Calandor’s only child and heir, Eleesa, leaving him well positioned to control the ducal throne when tragedy struck two years later.
In the Year of the Advancing Wind (947 DR), the realm of Calandor was ravaged by the battle between the silver dragon Teskulladar “Manytalons” and the white dragon Cortulorrulagalargath. In his death throes, the great white wyrm fell from the sky onto the remnants of Delimbiyran, slaying the reigning duke of Calandor and his retinue. Tyndal, his son-in-law, was proclaimed duke and relocated the ducal seat to the baronial seat of the old Barony of the Steeping Falls. Construction of Daggerford Castle atop the ruined remnants of Morlin Castle began immediately.
In the Year of the Black Horde (1235 DR), much of the town and Castle Daggerford were burned to the crown during a prolonged siege by an army of orcs. After this attack, the duke’s subjects began building their shops and homes outside the castle proper, closer to the River Delimbiyr. A berm was required to separate the spreading town from the frequent spring floods, which in time led to a wall that encircled both town and castle.
The modern era has seen three dukes of Daggerford. Duke Conan Daggerford assumed the ducal throne in the Year of Thunder (1306 DR), several years after his marriage to Lady Sonja Loravatha, daughter of the reigning high knight of Loravtha at that time. In the Year of the Mace (1307 DR), shortly after his ascension to the ducal throne, Duke Conan granted the town of Daggerford its own charter, which his heirs have not seen fit to withdraw.
The union of Duke Conan and Duchess Sonja produced one son, Pryden Daggerford, in the Year of the Starfall (1300 DR). Unbeknownst to all, Duke Conan was secretly in love with Della Longhand, a commoner, who bore him an illegitimate son, Llewellyn Longhand, in the Year of the Griffon (1312 DR).
Duke Conan’s legitimate son, then known as Lord Pryden Daggerford, married Lady Analinda Talmost of Waterdeep, who bore him three heirs: Merovy Daggerford (1326 DR), Bronwyn Daggerford (1328 DR), and Pwyll Daggerford (1332 DR). Duke Conan died in the Year of the Lion (1340 DR), and Duke Pryden Daggerford acceded to the ducal throne.
Duke Pryden’s reign was marked by tragedy. His wife, Duchess Analinda, died of a wasting sickness in the Year of the Bloodbird (1346 DR). His eldest son and heir, Lord Merovy, died adventuring along the Unicorn Run in the Year of the Bow (1354 DR). The duke himself died in battle during the Dragonspear War in the Year of the Worm (1356 DR), leaving his youngest son to ascend the ducal throne on the field of battle.
The Dragonspear War (1356 DR) devastated the local economy, cutting off all trade from the south and leaving Daggerford on the front lines of a diabolic invasion. Fortunately the main fighting did not reach as far north as River Delimbiyr, allowing the duchy to begin recovering relatively quickly.

--
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Edited by - ericlboyd on 10 May 2012 20:42:25
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  19:51:16  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Conan and Sonja?

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ericlboyd
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  20:10:56  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Conan and Sonja?



Yeah, my not favorite either. N5 - Under Illefarn, page 16.

Pwyll, Bronwyn, Gwydion, Llewellyn, Mab ... it's like I'm reading about a town set in Prydain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Prydain).

The North: Daggerford is worse, names-wise.

--Eric

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Edited by - ericlboyd on 10 May 2012 20:21:50
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Jeremy Grenemyer
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  21:51:02  Show Profile Send Jeremy Grenemyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

I would say possible, but not assured. There are a fair number of "shared" noble names between the Waterdeep region and Cormyr, suggesting distant family ties between the two regions are not uncommon. (I like reusing noble names from one to the other to suggest such distant ties, and did that here as well.)
That's pretty cool.

I think there is a potential with this style of writing to grab both a reader's and a player's attention: they're likely to remember reading or hearing about a name from another sourcebook or during another adventure and want to follow up on it.

Good to remember for my own Realms writing.

Look for me and my content at EN World (user name: sanishiver).
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  21:54:41  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

Conan and Sonja?



Yeah, my not favorite either. N5 - Under Illefarn, page 16.

Pwyll, Bronwyn, Gwydion, Llewellyn, Mab ... it's like I'm reading about a town set in Prydain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Prydain).

The North: Daggerford is worse, names-wise.

--Eric



Did not realize it came from that module... I've got that one, but I've never gotten around to reading it...

Other than that, though, I love what you're giving us, here.

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ericlboyd
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Posted - 10 May 2012 :  23:55:05  Show Profile  Visit ericlboyd's Homepage Send ericlboyd a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It's an admittedly low bar, but N5 - Under Illefarn is one of the better 1e, 2e, or 3e modules.

However, there are tons of problems with it, which is why I'm in the middle of rewriting it. ;-)

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The Sage
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Posted - 11 May 2012 :  01:50:49  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

It's an admittedly low bar, but N5 - Under Illefarn is one of the better 1e, 2e, or 3e modules.

However, there are tons of problems with it, which is why I'm in the middle of rewriting it. ;-)

Which is also why I'm seriously reconsidering using what you've presented here, to revisit the N5 module with my gaming group at the end of the year.

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Eli the Tanner
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Posted - 11 May 2012 :  04:38:44  Show Profile  Visit Eli the Tanner's Homepage Send Eli the Tanner a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Your work is fantastic Eric. A treasure trove of Realmslore. Thankyou.

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Markustay
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Posted - 11 May 2012 :  19:37:27  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Agreed - all of this should go into a Retrun to Illefarn 5e module.

Or better yet - since the plan is to separate the lore from the rules - just release it sooner then 5e (not sure if modules are possible under that paradigm). It can always become part of a Swordcoast regional splat (using Daggerford as the 'start area', which I'd like to see turned into a 'base camp' type of approach for each and every future regional source).

EDIT: such a product should also include the 'lost' information about Wormford, provided by THO in this thread, since it appeared on the inside cover of the original Under Illefarn.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 11 May 2012 19:46:49
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