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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2006 :  18:03:57  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

I tend to include hair and clothing in almost every character that I write about and sometimes it does turn into a info dump depending on what I'm writing because of the word limit.



I've noticed that tendency with your Laborers, though you've been getting better at it.

I used to be even worse about it, though... I used to not only give the entire physical description in the first paragraph, I'd also do a mini-biography. I did that for a long time, and then just abruptly stopped doing it, without really realizing it.

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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2006 :  18:45:24  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

I tend to include hair and clothing in almost every character that I write about and sometimes it does turn into a info dump depending on what I'm writing because of the word limit.



I've noticed that tendency with your Laborers, though you've been getting better at it.

I used to be even worse about it, though... I used to not only give the entire physical description in the first paragraph, I'd also do a mini-biography. I did that for a long time, and then just abruptly stopped doing it, without really realizing it.



Yes,

I know you have and well, it happens because I don't want a huge article with a huge word count. So, that will keep happening mostly because I distill some details down into short paragraphs.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 28 Jul 2006 :  01:47:26  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Blueblade

As for the "always describing the character with eye and hair color" thing, I've heard many authors - not just Ed, here at Candlekeep - say this is something their EDITORS insist on. If the author doesn't do it, the editor puts it in.



I have no problem with these details being present. I just don't want them in the aforementioned info-dump format. Granted, you likely do need to get the hair color out there pretty quickly, but it doesn't have to be immediate -- it can be a few paragraphs later, or even a page or two later.

The POV matters, too. If the story is being told from the perspective of one specific character, then the details about that character's appearance can be held for a while.

I love the inclusion of these details myself. The format of their inclusion doesn't specifically bother me either. I'm happy with an info-dump relating to a character's appearance, but only if the work itself is small.

Usually, in larger works, I prefer that the appearance of the character develop naturally across pages and through several paragraphs. You've got more space... so enjoy the time to describe the character fully and with room for relating any extra facts regarding that appearance.

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Edited by - The Sage on 28 Jul 2006 01:49:01
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 28 Jul 2006 :  02:09:19  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Blueblade

As for the "always describing the character with eye and hair color" thing, I've heard many authors - not just Ed, here at Candlekeep - say this is something their EDITORS insist on. If the author doesn't do it, the editor puts it in.



I have no problem with these details being present. I just don't want them in the aforementioned info-dump format. Granted, you likely do need to get the hair color out there pretty quickly, but it doesn't have to be immediate -- it can be a few paragraphs later, or even a page or two later.

The POV matters, too. If the story is being told from the perspective of one specific character, then the details about that character's appearance can be held for a while.

I love the inclusion of these details myself. The format of their inclusion doesn't specifically bother me either. I'm happy with an info-dump relating to a character's appearance, but only if the work itself is small.

Usually, in larger works, I prefer that the appearance of the character develop naturally across pages and through several paragraphs. You've got more space... so enjoy the time to describe the character fully and with room for relating any extra facts regarding that appearance.



Exactly what I was trying to say. :)

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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Zanan
Senior Scribe

Germany
942 Posts

Posted - 28 Jul 2006 :  11:20:30  Show Profile  Visit Zanan's Homepage Send Zanan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
IMHO it is far more frustrating to see the extended NPC statblocks in the new sourcebooks including DETAILED descriptions of sneak attacking and the like. That is already limited space wasted ...
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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 21 Aug 2006 :  22:59:20  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage  Send GothicDan an AOL message  Send GothicDan an ICQ Message  Click to see GothicDan's MSN Messenger address  Send GothicDan a Yahoo! Message Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Statblocks? Bleah!

I think in large part, appearance of character and other idiosyncratic traits fail so miserably (and are relegated into the 'dump' category) because they are so static in presentation. As WinterFox pointed out so poignantly, the use of third-person omniscient does not mean that everything in the room/cavern/field freezes and some divinity comes down and inspects every little aspect of the scene and characters.

You want to talk about intelligent green eyes?

Well, then make the character say something intelligent AND mention - casually - those green eyes. Psychologically, you'll create a conditional link between the two ideas when one thinks of the character.

Movement and dynamism, I think, in large part makes 'info-dumps' seem more like actual thematic description.

On another note, for any authors present:
Do you guys often listen to music when you write? And, if so, what kind of music? For which novels/stories? ;)

Planescape Fanatic

"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 21 Aug 2006 :  23:05:39  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

On another note, for any authors present:
Do you guys often listen to music when you write? And, if so, what kind of music? For which novels/stories? ;)



I know I do. As for what kinds, well the 80's station on digital cable. As for CD's that I listen to when writing, they are usually metal, rock, 80's metal, alternative, country, whatever really. It varies with how I'm feeling that day and what I'm trying to get written.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 21 Aug 2006 :  23:41:58  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well I mostly agree with GothicDan on the "info-dumping", but there is always the question of medium and style of writing. Some authors, like Balzac and to a degree Huysman can "freeze" a room as you say and still write great books as their style is built up around the description. But for each writer that can handle this sort of writing, there is a hundred that can not, as writing with excess is an art-form in itself.

As to music when writing, mostly 60's and 70's rock in all forms with classical, blues and soul (the old version there also) in between.
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Faraer
Great Reader

3298 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  00:06:07  Show Profile  Visit Faraer's Homepage Send Faraer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Authorial asides to introduce background can be more elegant than the clumsy contortions some authors go through to avoid them...

It's a good thing for novice authors to avoid, but by the time someone is worth reading, they've figured out their way of doing things which may or may not obey conventional rules of thumb.
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  01:20:00  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kuje

quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

On another note, for any authors present:
Do you guys often listen to music when you write? And, if so, what kind of music? For which novels/stories? ;)



I know I do. As for what kinds, well the 80's station on digital cable. As for CD's that I listen to when writing, they are usually metal, rock, 80's metal, alternative, country, whatever really. It varies with how I'm feeling that day and what I'm trying to get written.

As do I. But I cannot stand contemporary music, or anything commercial from the radio.

I've a stock of movie instrumental soundtracks, a horde of classical music CDs (but then, you already know that don't you GD ) that would dwarf the size of a silver dragon, and discs made from the recordings of my own quartet's performances.

That comprises my music library. Selections are often loaded into my iPod, which also benefits my long ride to work on the train.

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Edited by - The Sage on 22 Aug 2006 01:22:04
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  01:57:45  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My musical tastes range all over the place... Flogging Molly, Gaelic Storm, Weird Al, They Might Be Giants and Barenaked Ladies are all faves of mine. Generally, though, when I'm writing, I pick something generic, just to have as a kind of white noise. I've always got music on, but when I'm writing, I go for the generic stuff, because that I'm less inclined to pay attention to.

I either listen to the radio (which plays too much R&B and hip-hop for my liking) or club977, an 80's internet station.

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James P. Davis
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
244 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  02:17:26  Show Profile  Visit James P. Davis's Homepage Send James P. Davis a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
On another note, for any authors present:
Do you guys often listen to music when you write? And, if so, what kind of music? For which novels/stories? ;)

Well, I posted on my blog a while back the 'soundtrack' for Bloodwalk, but my constant music for writing is always instrumental.

Typically I listen to (in order of appearance):
The Hours ST
House of Sand and Fog ST
King Arthur ST
Salem's Lot ST
and almost anything by Midnight Syndicate.

During the 'brainstorming' phase of a project just about anything goes...except country, no offense intended if you like it, it's just not my thing.

Best,
--James

"Everybody is a book of blood; wherever we're opened, we're red."--Clive Barker

FR: RotD2:"Possessions"
Wizards:Bloodwalk
Citadels: The Shield of Weeping Ghosts
Wilds: The Restless Shore
Ed Greenwood Presents Waterdeep: Circle of Skulls (May 2010)
Book trailers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jC-ska7ohVk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfvFdQ8bLp0
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1770 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  04:07:03  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I don't listen to music when I write. The quieter the room is, the better it is for me.
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 22 Aug 2006 :  15:16:59  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

On another note, for any authors present:
Do you guys often listen to music when you write? And, if so, what kind of music? For which novels/stories? ;)



Lots and lots of music, from lots and lots of bands. I'm generally a rocker, but I listen to all sorts of things. Some of my WiPs and even some of my characters have playlists all their own. Ghostwalker has a playlist* -- consisting of music I listened to constantly during the writing process, mostly APC, Rob Zombie, and a couple Linkin Park tracks -- and Fox-at-Twilight has a playlist as well (consisting of a lot of Evanescence), though hers is in need of a revamp.

(* I think I posted the Ghostwalker playlist on my blog, way back when. Probably sometime in the fall of 2005.)

Music works as a connecting bus for me -- I can pop on a song and it'll take me back to the frame of mind I was in when I last listened to it in conjunction with a character, which is very, very helpful when I revisit someone.

Plus, I find that music often inspires me to look at things in a different way. I'll hear something -- some lyric -- and see the reflection in my character, and BAM! New dimension.

And you can be inspired by lots of different things. One of my favorite anecdotes is getting inspired to conceive of a character in a certain light because of a Britney Spears song (yes -- yes, gasp all you want, it *did* happen). This, in turn, informs a trilogy I'm envisioning.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  05:35:11  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage  Send GothicDan an AOL message  Send GothicDan an ICQ Message  Click to see GothicDan's MSN Messenger address  Send GothicDan a Yahoo! Message Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Maybe I'll have to give music a go while I'm writing. It seems to work for quite a few writers here! When unmedicated for my terrible ADHD, I can't even finish a page of writing, usually. I pretty much can't do -anything- in absolute silence, because then my mind starts desperately searching for something to jump its focus around on - down to the sound of the beating of my heart.

But, for many of the authors here, music seems to work very well. And I find it surprisingly that many of the authors appear to listen to music thematically appropriate to what they're writing. That's inspiration in one of its truest forms, I think. :)

RE: Info Dumping -

Of course, there are ALWAYS exceptions, especially in regards to individual style, mood, and theme of a given bit of writing. The hard part is for many writers (newer AND older), I think, is figuring out exactly when 'breaking' those writing 'rules' is actually beneficial or not. If, as Jorkens put it, they're really struggling to get AROUND doing it, I'd rather they just do it in the first place.

As a very artistic ex of mine put it, "Sincerity is where the heart is born." ;)

Planescape Fanatic

"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD

Edited by - GothicDan on 23 Aug 2006 05:37:28
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  06:11:48  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

Maybe I'll have to give music a go while I'm writing. It seems to work for quite a few writers here! When unmedicated for my terrible ADHD, I can't even finish a page of writing, usually. I pretty much can't do -anything- in absolute silence, because then my mind starts desperately searching for something to jump its focus around on - down to the sound of the beating of my heart.



It's pretty much been proven that for some people, music aids concentration, while for others, it can detract.

I like to have music playing pretty much all day, except when I'm trying to watch TV (which I don't do that much) or when I go to bed.

And of course, some music has special effects for individuals. Enigma's first CD, MCMXC A.D., just about always calms me down, no matter how angry I might be. And Meat Loaf's first album, the original Bat Out of Hell, never fails to perk me up, making me both more energetic and more cheerful.

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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  06:14:54  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hells,

I can't even fall asleep without something playing in the background and if it turns off, I'm wide awake to find out what happened. It's not easy to stumble around your room in the darkness to reset the cd player or start up itunes because the puter rebooted.

Otherwise, I always have some music on less I'm reading.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  06:47:37  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have all the radios in my house playing classical/baroque music, either from a purely classical radio station or from compilations CDs I've made myself.

Music's playing all day, when I'm reading, writing, rocking little Narnra to sleep (she rather seems to like swaying to the wind-instrumental tunes of Handel), or the Lady K and I heading off to sleepy land.

Classical music, simply put, is the soundtrack of our life together.

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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  07:04:49  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage  Send GothicDan an AOL message  Send GothicDan an ICQ Message  Click to see GothicDan's MSN Messenger address  Send GothicDan a Yahoo! Message Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
And do the three of you wondrous amateur writers (and any other authors who care to answer!) and mods ever find that, when listening to music throughout the day, you ever just get the random urge to sit down and write about something?

I get that sometimes myself, but in large part I think it's because of how "bombastic" my music is. I tend to listen to very... Energetic (whether it's negative or positive energy) music. A lot of Scandinavian metal bands (Nightwish, Tristania, Theatre of Tragedy, Apocalyptica, Therion..) and the like.

There's one song that I've been listening to called "The Wild Hunt," which makes me want to write about paganism and forests and werewolves and druids every time I listen to it...

Oddly enough, the vast majority of classical music tends to not stimulate my mind enough. Now, Classical-Metal, such as what Apocalyptica plays and to an extent Therion - that REALLY gets me. I love the melding of classical metal with orchestral instruments, choirs, and really quality vocals, particularly a female/male dichotomy (woefully underrepresented amongst American bands. :().

Though Moonlight Sonata has always been close to my heart, since I was all of 10 years old or so, and I heard it playing in a store.

Planescape Fanatic

"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD

Edited by - GothicDan on 23 Aug 2006 07:06:41
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  07:09:33  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh,

Aye. I could listen to a CD or the digital cable and an idea, or ideas, will come to be that I didn't have before. But as I said, and as a few people have said, it's rare for me to never have music on. The only time I really turn it off is when I'm reading.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  07:51:32  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

And do the three of you wondrous amateur writers (and any other authors who care to answer!) and mods ever find that, when listening to music throughout the day, you ever just get the random urge to sit down and write about something?
Do you recall what I was telling you the other day about inspiring sources for my homebrew campaign setting?

In other words, yes I have on occasion been motivated to write either during the playing of music or just after. Other times, music motives me to draw and craft visual images of how I'm feeling while listening to music -- or give visual representation to certain ideas I'm thinking about.

quote:
Oddly enough, the vast majority of classical music tends to not stimulate my mind enough. Now, Classical-Metal, such as what Apocalyptica plays and to an extent Therion - that REALLY gets me. I love the melding of classical metal with orchestral instruments, choirs, and really quality vocals, particularly a female/male dichotomy (woefully underrepresented amongst American bands. :().
Hmmm... sounds intriguing. Arivia once suggested a few samples to me, which I listened to and enjoyed. Perhaps you could suggest some others?

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"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage

Edited by - The Sage on 23 Aug 2006 07:52:40
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  08:04:45  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If my writing where influenced by the moods of the music I would get some weird results. Those birds of mine would be decadent creatures of sex, drugs and fast cars and the gnomes would... Well we are not going to talk about that.

For the same reason I am not often inspired by the music: speedy's coming by Scorpions don't make me write about Quicklings, Joe Walsh's Rocky Mountain Way doesnt result in dwarf-stories, Carol Kings I feel the earth move does not give me an inspiration for giants and Deep Purples Fireball does not give me an urge to write about Red Wizards of Thay.

Classical and the quieter parts of Progressive Rock (Rick Wakeman, old Barclay James Harvest and Satin Whale) I generally listen to whilst reading, not writing.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30283 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  11:33:44  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

And do the three of you wondrous amateur writers (and any other authors who care to answer!) and mods ever find that, when listening to music throughout the day, you ever just get the random urge to sit down and write about something?


Not from the music... For me, I just need the background noise that music provides.

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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Kiaransalyn
Senior Scribe

United Kingdom
762 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  12:11:23  Show Profile Send Kiaransalyn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GothicDan

And do the three of you wondrous amateur writers (and any other authors who care to answer!) and mods ever find that, when listening to music throughout the day, you ever just get the random urge to sit down and write about something?


Some music really helps me when I'm writing. I used to prefer a quiet room. However, as a consequence of my abject poverty and the density of housing in England and now in the Netherlands I find that silence isn't possible. Therefore, I need background music. This is usually a classical music station.

At the moment, I'm working on a novel about a Rock and Roll band. I find that The Fields of the Nephilim, Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple help me out with certain scenes.

Nick Drake, Jeff Buckley and Lorenna McKennitt are all good inspirations as regards my writing too.


Death is Life
Love is Hate
Revenge is Forgiveness


Ken: You from the States?
Jimmy: Yeah. But don't hold it against me.
Ken: I'll try not to... Just try not to say anything too loud or crass.

Edited by - Kiaransalyn on 23 Aug 2006 12:12:26
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Chosen of Moradin
Master of Realmslore

Brazil
1120 Posts

Posted - 23 Aug 2006 :  14:03:08  Show Profile  Visit Chosen of Moradin's Homepage  Click to see Chosen of Moradin's MSN Messenger address Send Chosen of Moradin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Music have a major role in my life, too.
I stay almost all day listening to something (varied styles, to a varied humor). So, when Im writing a plot, an adventure or a npc, Im always listening to something:

When elves, druids and rangers are involved, Im generally listening brazilian shamanic songs, or something from Enya, Medwyn Goodall or Oliver Shanti.

Dwarves and Rammstein or Manowar make a good combination, to me.

When Im working on plots, villains, etc., genarally the music is always "sorted" - but Rhapsody, Therion, Haendel and Midnight Syndicate are always good choices to me.

Now, every time that I heard Hammerfall, I think on a cleric of Tempus bathed in blood and screaming for more...

Dwarf, DM, husband, and proud of this! :P

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