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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 30 Apr 2008 :  23:35:23  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

A question, based on some of the excellent dialogue read here -

Jamallo Green mentioned The King James Bible. Now, Elminster is just one of several powerful Faerûnians who have been to Earth (I know the Simbul has, and I believe Khelben has as well). We also have several entire races (like the Mulan) that were supposedly transported from Earth (nothing canon, methinks, but hinted at profusely) to Toril.

(snip)




Some years ago, Ed's take on what might happen if my Roman Catholic Hermeticist died on Toril was that some celestial being would ship him home to his own cosmology, and the God(s) of this sphere would deal with him according to the local rules of Earth.

And it's "Kreen," please, with a "K." The Green One lives in Canada!





I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 30 Apr 2008 :  23:38:09  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert



(snip)

And that's not even taking into account whether or not Ao would allow any specific non-Realms deity in, or how the deities of the Realms would react to an interloper deity. A monotheistic religion would be a threat to every deity of the Realms.



Ask Cyric how the gods, goddesses, and Ao regard monotheism!




I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Rinonalyrna Fathomlin
Great Reader

USA
7106 Posts

Posted - 01 May 2008 :  01:17:38  Show Profile  Visit Rinonalyrna Fathomlin's Homepage Send Rinonalyrna Fathomlin a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie
The Realms of the Dragons story featuring the Sembian hero of Black Wolf (all the names are blanking at the moment)...


Talbot.

"Instead of asking why we sleep, it might make sense to ask why we wake. Perchance we live to dream. From that perspective, the sea of troubles we navigate in the workaday world might be the price we pay for admission to another night in the world of dreams."
--Richard Greene (letter to Time)
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 03 May 2008 :  20:57:25  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jamallo Kreen

And it's "Kreen," please, with a "K." The Green One lives in Canada!


My mistake. Must be the beard--or the undying love for the Realms.
quote:
Originally posted by Rinonalyrna Fathomlin

quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie
The Realms of the Dragons story featuring the Sembian hero of Black Wolf (all the names are blanking at the moment)...

Talbot.

Ah yes, that's the hairy chap.

The story is called "How Sharper than a Serpent's Tooth"--which is from King Lear, actually--by Dave Gross.

The full quotation is:
"How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
To have a thankless child!"

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Jamallo Kreen
Master of Realmslore

USA
1537 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2008 :  01:49:07  Show Profile  Visit Jamallo Kreen's Homepage Send Jamallo Kreen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Paizo Publishing Announces Complete Author List for the Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting Hardcover -- Paizo's first Pathfinder™ hardcover to be released at Gen Con:

The Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting hardcover was written by (in alphabetical order):

Stan!
Keith Baker
Wolfgang Baur
Clinton J. Boomer
Jason Bulmahn
Joshua J. Frost
Ed Greenwood
Stephen S. Greer
Jeff Grubb
James Jacobs
Michael Kortes
Tito Leati
Mike McArtor
Rob McCreary
Erik Mona
Jason Eric Nelson
Jeff Quick
Sean K Reynolds
David Schwartz
Leandra Christine Schneider
F. Wesley Schneider
Amber E. Scott
Owen K.C. Stephens
Todd Stewart
James L. Sutter
Greg A. Vaughan
Jeremy Walker
JD Wiker

Also included are essays on world-building written by Robert J. Kuntz and R.A. Salvatore.




I iterate: it is not necessary to buy anything from Hasbro in order to continue reading works written by (many of ...) your favorite "Realms" authors.

Personally, I know next-to-nothing about Pathfinder™ -- I'm still buying up OD&D and AD&D Forgotten Realms™ supplements and modules -- but I'm sure that this book will be worth a read.






I have a mouth, but I am in a library and must not scream.


Feed the poor and stroke your ego, too: http://www.freerice.com/index.php.

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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4586 Posts

Posted - 28 Jul 2008 :  02:22:01  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage  Send Erik Scott de Bie an AOL message Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I also would like to pimp Pathfinder, which is really, really cool. Personally, I would jump at the chance to write for them.

It is, however, a little out of left field to post this list, since only two people on that list (Ed and Bob) currently write Realms novels . . . at least as far as I know.

So it's perhaps misleading to suggest that we other Realms authors not on that list don't need your support. We really do, and we really value both your support and your feedback.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Signature of Shameless Self-Promotion +6: Order my sixth novel, Shadow of the Winter King (Amazon, e-signing, Dragonmoon Press)

Also check out my Realms work, most recently Shadowbane: Eye of Justice, out now on e-readers everywhere! (Kindle, Nook)
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Fire Wraith
Seeker

USA
37 Posts

Posted - 30 Jul 2008 :  22:03:00  Show Profile  Visit Fire Wraith's Homepage  Click to see Fire Wraith's MSN Messenger address Send Fire Wraith a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would say, purchase what you like. One could refuse to buy any Hasbro products, period - or even just any WoTC products at all, but is that necessarily going to make any impact on RPG decisions? Personally, I don't intend to buy any of the 4th Edition RPG products. However, I still intend to purchase any novels by authors that I like, that catch my interest, regardless of the Forgotten Realms imprint, or pre/post Spellplague status. I encourage others to do likewise.

Of course, this doesn't mean I wouldn't love to see them start writing for Pathfinder.
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darkelf15962
Seeker

22 Posts

Posted - 14 Mar 2010 :  14:03:41  Show Profile  Visit darkelf15962's Homepage Send darkelf15962 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have a question that may sound a bit silly, how would one go about writing a Forgotten Realms novel? I doubt I would(or could[I seriously doubt I could!]), but I'm curious anyway.
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 14 Mar 2010 :  16:37:31  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A new question in the Authors Forum? Holy crap! It's been a while.

darkelf, are you asking how the writer would go about the task from the creative/artistic perspective, or are you asking how a writer would get the assignment to write a FR novel from the publisher?
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 17 Mar 2010 :  08:16:27  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, just to make the wait for the next question a bit shorter, to anyone who might like to answer: How much work do you put into the first few paragraphs of a story compared to the rest of it? (I know Lindsey Davis, who writes crime-novels set in the Flavian-era Rome, has said that she gives this special attention so as to attempt to pull the reader in.)

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 17 Mar 2010 :  17:10:22  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi, Kajehase. What you're talking about is what writers call creating a strong "hook." It is good to pull a reader into the story right away. It's vital to pull an editor in right away, particularly when you're still trying to establish yourself as a pro. If an editor doesn't already know your name, and the first few sentences don't grab him, there's very little chance of him reading any farther. So, if the story turns into a masterpiece on Page Two, too bad. You still won't ever sell it.

So yes, you do want to invest a good deal of thought and work into the first few lines. The ideal is to rivet the reader's attention with the very first sentence, although that isn't always possible.

One reliable method for creating a strong hook is to start out with the characters in action. By action, I don't necessarily mean violence and combat, although it can be that. But you want to show the characters doing something interesting.

There are other methods, too, but I think you often need a strong prose style to make them work.
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Rosemary Jones
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
148 Posts

Posted - 10 Apr 2010 :  05:35:54  Show Profile  Visit Rosemary Jones's Homepage Send Rosemary Jones a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kajehase

Well, just to make the wait for the next question a bit shorter, to anyone who might like to answer: How much work do you put into the first few paragraphs of a story compared to the rest of it? (I know Lindsey Davis, who writes crime-novels set in the Flavian-era Rome, has said that she gives this special attention so as to attempt to pull the reader in.)



The first line gets rewritten several times, at least in my case. I'm madly jealous of Dick Francis for coming up with some of the best hooks in the business. He had one classic that went along the lines of:

"I never liked my father's third wife, but I didn't kill her."

I believe in the second sentence,the narrator reveals the police are standing on the steps and preparing to question him.

Why is this all so great: because it reveals a great deal of the hero's problem (he's under suspicion of murder) and issues (a father who remarries often and troubled relationship with that fact).

In fact, as the Brits would say, bloody brilliant.

"Call me Ismael" is my second favorite opening line.

Rosemary Jones
www.rosemaryjones.com
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 10 Apr 2010 :  10:02:15  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rosemary Jones

quote:
Originally posted by Kajehase

Well, just to make the wait for the next question a bit shorter, to anyone who might like to answer: How much work do you put into the first few paragraphs of a story compared to the rest of it? (I know Lindsey Davis, who writes crime-novels set in the Flavian-era Rome, has said that she gives this special attention so as to attempt to pull the reader in.)



The first line gets rewritten several times, at least in my case. I'm madly jealous of Dick Francis for coming up with some of the best hooks in the business. He had one classic that went along the lines of:

"I never liked my father's third wife, but I didn't kill her."

I believe in the second sentence,the narrator reveals the police are standing on the steps and preparing to question him.

Why is this all so great: because it reveals a great deal of the hero's problem (he's under suspicion of murder) and issues (a father who remarries often and troubled relationship with that fact).

In fact, as the Brits would say, bloody brilliant.

"Call me Ismael" is my second favorite opening line.



My personal favourite. While not really a novel I think Alfred De Musset's more or less autobiographicThe Confession of a Child of the Century deserves a honorary mention here:

"Before the history of any life can be written, that life must be lived;so that it is not my life that I am now writing."
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 12 Apr 2010 :  15:45:25  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My favourite opening (today, at least) would have to be from Lindsey Davis's The Silver Pigs:

"When the girl came rushing up the steps, I decided she was wearing far too many clothes.

It was late summer. Rome frizzled like a pancake on a griddleplate. People unlaced their shoes but had to keep them on; not even an elephant could cross the streets unshod. People flopped on stools in shadowed doorways, bare knees apart, naked to the waist - and in the backstreets of the Aventine Sector where I lived, that was just the women.

I was standing in the Forum. She was running. She looked overdressed and dangerously hot, but sunstroke or suffocation had not yet finished her off. She was shining and sticky as a glazed pastry plait, and when she hurtled up the steps of the Temple of Saturn straight missed me, just. Some men are born lucky; others are called Didius Falco."

And then it gets better.

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 12 Apr 2010 :  20:20:28  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The Falco series is terrific. I'm two novels behind on reading it. I need to get caught up soon.
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 27 Aug 2010 :  15:57:58  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Another question, of a perhaps less serious nature, but still something I'm curious about: Has any of the writer-types (published or otherwise) ever had a GREAT idea for a story form in your mind so complete that you've even started jotting down notes to remember it, only for you to realise that "Oh bugger! This is that movie/book/play I watched/read some time ago? Or is it just me?

(Three years ago, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I'd even started naming the characters when I realised why it all seemed so familiar.)

And to Richard, if you've not caught up to Nemesis yet - she's begun to kill off recurring characters. To say more would be a spoiler, but expect to be a bit shocked by the end of the book.

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1763 Posts

Posted - 27 Aug 2010 :  17:35:51  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kajehase: I've often started working with a plot idea, then realized, "Oh, damn it, that's such-and-such." I suspect it happens to many writers.

Of course, there's a judgment call involved here, because it's extremely difficult to come up with a plot that's entirely unlike anything that has gone before. But I find that when the similarity suddenly rears up and smacks me in the face, that probably means I need to start over.

I'll brace myself when I get around to reading Nemesis. Butcher's most recent Dresden novel is kind of like that, too. Must be something in the air.
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Sandstorm
Learned Scribe

Canada
80 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  05:41:49  Show Profile  Visit Sandstorm's Homepage  Click to see Sandstorm's MSN Messenger address Send Sandstorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Question. Is writing about halflings prohibited outside the Forgotten Realms setting? I know that elves, dwarves, magic, dragons etc is all fair game, but is the word halfling itself copywrited?
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Dennis
Great Reader

9933 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  06:15:19  Show Profile Send Dennis a Private Message  Reply with Quote
No. Halfling is originally another name for J. R. R. Tolkien's Hobbit and a gnome.

Every beginning has an end.
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Sandstorm
Learned Scribe

Canada
80 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  06:25:00  Show Profile  Visit Sandstorm's Homepage  Click to see Sandstorm's MSN Messenger address Send Sandstorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
oh i know that its a different term for hobbit, but even hobbit im not sure if id be allowed to use in a personal work.
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  07:36:58  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There's halflings in Golarion, (including some of the fiction-pieces) so my guess would be that the term is safe for use for your own work. However, everyone who sees the term will think either "Lord of the Rings" or "Dungeons & Dragons," so you may want to consider whether you want to include them.

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  07:40:44  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh, and if I've understood things correctly - D&D halfings were originally called hobbits, and the change was named because that term (hobbits) were deemed to be part of the Tolkien estate's intellectual property. So: halflings good; hobbits bad. And I'm not going to comment on two- or four-legs.

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Sandstorm
Learned Scribe

Canada
80 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  08:09:28  Show Profile  Visit Sandstorm's Homepage  Click to see Sandstorm's MSN Messenger address Send Sandstorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well ya, Tolkien was Hobbit, Halfling is DnD, Kender is dragonlance. . . and Im aware that Pathfinder uses halflings, but they use the whole thing, so im sure theres some sort of legal agreement there.
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Sandstorm
Learned Scribe

Canada
80 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  08:16:45  Show Profile  Visit Sandstorm's Homepage  Click to see Sandstorm's MSN Messenger address Send Sandstorm a Private Message  Reply with Quote
but youre right. . . any attempt at that might hinder a work for people would assume it to be dungeons and dragosn related. not that thats wholly a bad thing.
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Christopher_Rowe
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
879 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2011 :  16:18:37  Show Profile  Visit Christopher_Rowe's Homepage Send Christopher_Rowe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Sandstorm

but youre right. . . any attempt at that might hinder a work for people would assume it to be dungeons and dragosn related. not that thats wholly a bad thing.



You have an awesome screen name!

My Realms novel, Sandstorm, is now available for ordering.
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