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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 08 Oct 2005 :  01:58:45  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Oh, well said, sir! Well SAID!!
love,
THO
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David Lázaro
Seeker

Spain
37 Posts

Posted - 08 Oct 2005 :  02:07:48  Show Profile  Visit David Lázaro's Homepage Send David Lázaro a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hang in there, Baalster. Ed has many, many demands on his time, and a lot of factors we scribes either dont know (or cant make public yet) as to why this or that query gets answered or delayed . . . like someone else writing a novel that uses locations or people you or someone else asks about. However, Ed has NOT forgotten you, I promise (because he said so, in an e-mail to me about an hour ago).

Which is precisely why I keep smiling every night that my answers (also regarding Silverymoon, Baalster), are kept unanswered. I tend to flirt with the idea of another book in cities series written by Elaine Cunningham, for example. She wrote some evocative (although short) passages about Silverymoon in her Elfsong novel.

And if it's not that, maybe it's another, even better thing; I'm currently very excited with the idea of having Power of Faern next year. A book that will surely give legs to any long-running Realms campaign out there.

Heh, and the questions and answers are getting very interesting as of late, as I've already remarked in previous entry.

I would also like to ask one question to the (always lovingly flirtatious) Hooded One: how was the process of buying, selling and getting information about magic items in the original Realms campaign?

I don't like the feeling of how we are handling it right now in our campaigns; it takes some magic away from the, well, magic. I've read the notes from the previous scrolls here, but I haven't found an entry that described the feeling of it.

Thanks for your time, lady.
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Arthedain
Seeker

16 Posts

Posted - 08 Oct 2005 :  11:32:36  Show Profile  Visit Arthedain's Homepage Send Arthedain a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

There might be more information in an old Dragon article by Steven Schend entitled "Sleep of Ages". I can't recall the issue number, but I think it's in the 200s. The paragraphs in the Dumathoin entry were a condensed version of Steven's most excellent article.
It was in DRAGON #224.




Mr. Boyd and The Sage: Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, Dragon #224 was published before my D&D-days. I checked on Paizo's website, and the issue was listed as 'currently unavailable', so I guess I'll have to drop be one of my two FLGSs and see if I get lucky :).
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 08 Oct 2005 :  14:31:09  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One


The non-Realms project I mentioned has begun to appear on the WotC Legendology page: its a novelette entitled Oroon Rising.



Part one is now up:

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/fict/20050920a

And now, part two:- http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/fict/20051003a

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30340 Posts

Posted - 08 Oct 2005 :  18:55:28  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Arthedain

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by ericlboyd

There might be more information in an old Dragon article by Steven Schend entitled "Sleep of Ages". I can't recall the issue number, but I think it's in the 200s. The paragraphs in the Dumathoin entry were a condensed version of Steven's most excellent article.
It was in DRAGON #224.




Mr. Boyd and The Sage: Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, Dragon #224 was published before my D&D-days. I checked on Paizo's website, and the issue was listed as 'currently unavailable', so I guess I'll have to drop be one of my two FLGSs and see if I get lucky :).



You could also check eBay... Failing all those things, drop me an email. I've got the Dragon Magazine Archive CD-ROMs, which means I could cut and paste the article to Word (I've done it with several other articles), or make a pdf of just the article.

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 09 Oct 2005 :  00:58:04  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Well met again, scribes of Candlekeep. I lay before you Ed of the Greenwoods reply to Lauzoril about Eds intentions regarding shedding some light on Khelbens past like hes done with Elminster. It would be nice to see how Khelben started out and how he came to be Mystras servant. And also when and why Elminster decided to settle in Shadowdale?
Ed speaks:


Ill go farther than Wooly Rupert: Ill say we DEFINITELY WILL see more of Khelbens past in Steven Schends forthcoming novel BLACKSTAFF (which I promise will be more of a blockbuster, mass market paperback format notwithstanding, than most of you can hope to expect). Yes, I created Khelben, but Steven has really made the character his own over the years, elaborate invented history and fascinating origin and deep psychological examination of Khelben and all - - and Im delighted to have read BLACKSTAFF, and can tell you true: Stevens the man to do it. He got Khelben right, and will answer for you those things you mention it would be nice to see. Hell do a lot more than that, too. Im happy to leave the illumination of Khelben in Stevens more-than-capable hands.
As for when and why Elminster decided to settle in Shadowdale, thats been covered briefly in existing Realmslore, but not in depth (yet). However, I Have Plans . . .



Insert diabolical laugh. And thats all Ed sent me in the way of an answer. More Realmlore (on another topic) next time.
love,
THO
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4569 Posts

Posted - 09 Oct 2005 :  02:08:44  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

As for when and why Elminster decided to settle in Shadowdale, thats been covered briefly in existing Realmslore, but not in depth (yet). However, I Have Plans . . .




I smell another Elminster book in the works......

I am the King of Rome, and above grammar

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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David Lázaro
Seeker

Spain
37 Posts

Posted - 09 Oct 2005 :  03:45:41  Show Profile  Visit David Lázaro's Homepage Send David Lázaro a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Dargoth
I smell another Elminster book in the works......

Or, as the Knights were Shadowdale residents, that piece of lore can be inserted in the beginning of the Knights novels. It could be a nice tie-in with the Elminster's series.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 10 Oct 2005 :  01:13:27  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, fellow scribes. Kajehase, I hope this reaches you in time. Ed replies to your Chondathan map words question:


Hi, Kajehase. I made much of this up on the spot, because the Chondathan written language in my notes consists of only a few fragments (so there isnt a lot more than what's here to reveal to you). However, here we go:

River: Raeth
Stream: Arraeth
Lake: Halgond
Swamp or Bog or Marsh: Raethgond
Sea: Morro
Forest: Lhar
Mountain: Arkhor (Mount: Arkh)
Hill: Mahan
Tor or Crag (lone hill with at least one steep, rocky cliff side): Arkul
Gorge (large): Loroth (literally Great Wound, from lorr [battle-cut], and oth [great])
Ravine (small): Lornal (literally Lasting Wound, from lorr [battle-cut], and nal [lasting or longtime])
Valley: Cauldoth (literally Great Bowl, from caulda [bowl or basin], and oth [great])
Ford: Lann
Bridge: Lantor
Trail: Ontahl
Road: Tahl
Cairn or Marker: obold

Some mapping notes: in any writing, expect to see River Ashaba rather than Ashaba River (so: Raeth Ashaba not Ashaba Raeth). Usages of Mount and Road usually follow the same construction.



So saith Ed, Sage Most Mighty of Realmslore. Whos hard at work on glorious new projects to entertain Realms fans in the years just ahead.
love to all,
THO
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 10 Oct 2005 :  06:00:36  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message
*rubs hands* My heartfelt thanks to Ed for the language-lesson, and to the Hooded One for bringing it. And Realmslore can never be too late, it arrives precisely in time - besides, my brothers are still only on chapter 1 of the Player's Handbook.

It may not be a dictionary, but I'd say it's enough to give me a rudimentary "feel" for how the language should look. *rubs hands again* One question arose as I looked them over: Does the Arkhen in "the River Arkhen" have anything to do with Arkhor?

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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Gray Richardson
Master of Realmslore

USA
1287 Posts

Posted - 10 Oct 2005 :  10:41:19  Show Profile  Visit Gray Richardson's Homepage Send Gray Richardson a Private Message
Indeed! Thanks very much for the linguistic tidbits! I love and crave these kinds of details. Such lore as to geographic naming conventions help only to deepen the sense of realism and make the Realms an ever vibrant setting with the feel of history and story oozing from every river, hill or road. (Or should I say every raeth, mahan or tahl? )
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 11 Oct 2005 :  15:39:20  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Well met as always, gentles. This time, Ed makes reply to Asgetrion in the matter of . . . are kitchen sinks (that flush into drains) common in the Realms, then? You also answered my query about tallhouses, and described that there may be even flushable toilets (with water coming from rooftop water cisterns). Maybe these sinks only available in large cities, and only among the wealthy? I had always assumed that washbasins are what people use for cleaning dishes...
Ed replies:


Sinks (small ones in bathchambers and large ones in kitchens and sculleries) are increasingly common in the Realms, but they do tend to be in larger, grander buildings. What they very rarely are is running-water sinks as we modern real-world types think of them.
Instead, theyre filled with carry-pitchers (tall, narrow, very sturdy cylindrical vessels with over-the-top leather splash flaps (really anti-splash-and-spill flaps, and really good handles; the equivalents of buckets with pour-spouts) by servants or family members in middle-class or lower-class households, brought from rooftop cisterns or cellar springs or pumps in cellars or in the street or yard outside. A cork or whittled plug keeps the water in the sink until its use is done (and many households keep a graywater sink full of water for hand-washing, not drained until its really filthy), and then it drains away through plumbing.
Only wealthy households have plumbed clean water (from rooftop cisterns, filled either with rainwater or by pumping) coming down into the sinks.
You are quite correct to assume that most people, especially in rural areas, use washbasins for washing. However, specifically for cleaning dishes, theres yet another method: if theres a handy stream nearby, the dishes (mainly platters, skillets, tankards, eating-forks and cooking knives, remember) are usually loaded into a carry-basket, taken to a sandy or gritty-mud spot on the bank, and scoured clean there, only to be rinsed properly clean in the stream-water, and brought back inside. Only when firewood permits, the stream is known to be unclean, AND the material the dishes are made of will stand up to boiling or warmed water, will the rinsed dishes also be washed or left to stand in hot or boiling water.



So saith Ed. Who does all the dishes in his household, following the old Boy Scout camping rule (and yes, Ed was a Boy Scout) of the cook never does the dishes. His wife craftily never lets him cook, so she never has to do the dishes.
And yes, Asgetrion, I know you asked a lot more in that same post. Ed will answer your other queries tomorrow.
P.S. Kajehase, the river is named for a mage, and so does not directly have anything to do with Arkhor.
love to all,
THO
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Rinonalyrna Fathomlin
Great Reader

USA
7106 Posts

Posted - 11 Oct 2005 :  19:47:51  Show Profile  Visit Rinonalyrna Fathomlin's Homepage Send Rinonalyrna Fathomlin a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One



So saith Ed. Who does all the dishes in his household, following the old Boy Scout camping rule (and yes, Ed was a Boy Scout) of the cook never does the dishes. His wife craftily never lets him cook, so she never has to do the dishes.





That's a nice rule.

"Instead of asking why we sleep, it might make sense to ask why we wake. Perchance we live to dream. From that perspective, the sea of troubles we navigate in the workaday world might be the price we pay for admission to another night in the world of dreams."
--Richard Greene (letter to Time)
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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 11 Oct 2005 :  21:03:54  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message
That depends Rinonalyrna, if I'd use it, I'd have to but new pottery once a week

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 12 Oct 2005 :  15:38:27  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all. Ed deals with Asgetrions multi-part query: I was curious about how "specialized" craftsmen are in the Realms? Are there any ropemakers, for example, who only make and sell ropes, or do most craftsmen (experts) try to make several products within their skill. Another example might also be a carpenter, who specializes in crafting fine pieces of furniture (such as chairs, tables, wooden statues, etc). If he lived in a remote village, would he also work occasionally as a roofer (or repair wooden things) for the other villagers (these tasks apparently fall within the Carpentry skill)?
On the same issue, I know that you have previously described "typical" villages in the Heartlands, but do these villagers usually buy their "everyday" items from peddlers or try to make them themselves (even without proper skills)? Such as barrels, pots, ropes, etc.
If there is no resident craftsman in the village (potter, craftsman, ropemaker, saddler, etc.), do they try to make these items themselves? I mean like "you make the barrels, since you have some experince in carpentry, and I will try to make us rope... Dornar know something about leather, so he'd probably be the best leatherworker among us"?
I know that there is usually a blacksmith, but how common (and profitable) would it be for a potter/cooper/ropemaker live in a small (farming) hamlet/village?
I also wish to ask the same about butchers - do most communitites with livestock have a resident butcher/slaughterer, or do they take the animals to the nearest town/city? Or do they slaughter the animals themselves when they need meat for cooking? If there is a butcher in a village, would he be paid for every animal, and would he also then prepare the meat to be sold elsewhere? Or is it more common to slaughter animals in the nearest town/city?
Then I'd like to ask how often (usually) travelling merchants/peddlers would visit small villages/hamlets?
Ed replies:


The short answer to all of this is: it depends. Or rather, it varies widely from place to place. Yes, there are many, many specialized craftworkers (to borrow your example, ropemakers who only make and sell ropes). The truly single-task workers tend to be in larger cities or at least market-moot towns or ports and waystops along busy trade routes, because such places can support them (for instance, a painter of gilded blazons of arms is more likely to dwell in a city containing a royal court than in a rural village).
However, its also true that most craftsmen (experts) try to make several products within their skill. For one thing, its practical (helps them with sideline income not restricted by guild rules or limitations of law or material or popularity on their main skill), and for another thing it can serve as a hobby or recreational outlet for daily stress and frustration. It can also save them coin, by doing more for themselves and by yielding items they can barter with other merchants to avoid having to go and buy something.
The more rural a person is, the more they are forced to be well-rounded in skills, or at least to try to do every necessary task (bartering with truly skilled neighbours for things they cant do, and co-operating with neighbours in all tasks [e.g. roundups and branding of herds, barn-raisings] beyond the strength or reach of a single individual). So, yes, your furniture-maker WOULD work as a roofer and repairer of wooden items.
Villagers need those everyday items you refer to, well . . . everyday. They will make do with whatever they have (which is why rural folk never really throw anything away, but instead toss broken things out back or into a barn corner until another use for them arises) until they have time to make a new item. If its cheaper to buy one, or they can wait until the next passing merchant passes, or the merchant can bring something better than they can make, theyll buy from that caravan wagon or peddler - - IF they have coin enough (many rural folk lack coins, so if the peddler wont barter fair, his goods are simply unobtainable to them). Which is why a peddler who dies out in the open is typically found without his pack-beasts or any of their gear: locals descend and swiftly take away and hide everything of value.
So, yes, villagers will try to make things for themselves if their ranks dont include the right sort of crafter (cooper to make barrels, ropemaker, etc.) - - or if they owe the local cooper too much. When you post I know that there is usually a blacksmith, but how common (and profitable) would it be for a potter/cooper/ropemaker live in a small (farming) hamlet/village? youre thinking too modern. Its nothing to do with profitability, it has to do with where you the Realms lad or lass were born, who you could get training with, how you can feed yourself where you live (i.e. do you live on a large family farm with food enough for all, or are you starving and MUST travel elsewhere or die?), and how much call there is for your skills where you are (if you learned to make a sound barrel from old Raldivur whos been in your hamlet of Oldbucket for sixty years, with every smart wagon-merchant stopping to buy a few new, sound barrels from him, and you too can now make a sound barrel even after Raldivurs died, then the merchants will buy your barrels). After all, if you have a roof over your head and food in your belly and your contentment overrides your daily gripes and dissatisfactions, you dont really need to earn a single actual coin, do you?
Butchering isnt usually considered the specialized skill in the Realms that its deemed to be in our modern-day real world of health inspectors and sanitized supermarket styrofoam trays of shrink-wrapped meat: people hunt and kill their own meals, or rear and slaughter them. There ARE butchers in cities, where folk dwell who dont have access to animals, and carvers (who can cut meat elegantly for feasts) are considered to have specialized skills Faerun-wide, but nigh every farmer can slaughter, skin, hang, smoke, and cut up everything from rabbits and fish to rothe.
Most livestock are still driven (herded by drovers, not put into a conveyance) from countryside ranch to paddocks outside large cities, and there purchased by local butchers who bring them inside the walls, to their own compounds, and slaughter them there. Some carcasses are salted or smoked and then packed (or in winter, allowed to freeze in the open, in an enclosure guarded from wolves and leucrotta, and other predators and scavengers), and then transported by ship or sledge to hungry cities, but the majority of eaten-for-meat critters arrive alive, on the hoof.
Elderly or infirm folk usually make an arrangement with a neighbour they trust to kill and hang their animals for them, paying the slaughterer with some of the meat from the carcasses. Its most common to butcher animals in the community where theyre going to be eaten.
However, rich ranching areas that have a handy port or riverbarge-accessible market town usually do have butchers with smoking-sheds, who buy many animals, butcher several daily, prepare them for shipping elsewhere, and have business dealings with shipcaptains or caravan-masters who do that shipping, to buy the readied meat.
As for how often (usually) travelling merchants/peddlers visit small villages/hamlets, the answer again is: it depends. On how isolated those communities are (and how dangerous the local citizenry, raiding orcs, monsters, avalanches, jungle diseases, general climate, or swooping dragons). How much coin the merchant can expect to make (not so much from the villagers, but reselling the items they barter to him, when he gets to other settlements), and how difficult his journey is (does he have to make or hire a raft? Portage? Climb mountain passes?). In pleasant rural farming countryside in fairly law-abiding territory, however, the answer would be: frequently. In summer, at least two or three a tenday in some places, one a tenday in others. On caravan routes: in the spring and fall rushes, the roads (and all camping-place settlements along them) can be jammed.



So saith Ed. More next time.
love to all,
THO
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 12 Oct 2005 :  17:01:22  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
Hmm,

That helps with my Compendium article as well.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  01:46:38  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, fellow scribes. I pass on Eds reply to khornes question: Well, now that we have seen plenty of examples of noble bands with the cranial capacity of an undead goblin, are there any young nobles who form bands that "mean business" as in trying to be serious adventurers, and(preferably) surviving? As in: a young noble has been gone for over a year from home, when he comes home his father is pissed of and asks him what he`s been doing, and as a means of reply he hauls up the skull of some horrible monster and/or precious jewelry from his backpack.
Ed replies:


Yes, there are plenty of nobles who truly want to be successful adventurers. Some crave the fame (as in: cool reputation sure to impress certain young ladies), some want the fortune (as in: independence from the family and freedom from their criticisms of young do-nothing, lazy wastrels), and some want to prove to themselves and/or a respected family member (usually father or crusty old grandsire) that they can achieve things through their own skills (in particular: daughters proving to fathers that they can be just as manly a son as their dead or never-born brothers would have been).
Many nobles will, of course, be far MORE impressed by offspring who achieve mercantile trading success elsewhere and just arrive back home as incredibly rich, worldly, sophisticated folk whove picked up valuable and exotic trophies of a grand tour of wider Faern.
Most noble wannabe-adventurers either swiftly perish in Undermountain or parts unknown in the Savage North (usually exploring heard-of-all-their-lives beast lairs near outlying family landholdings), or cleave to darker morals and establish short-lived careers in Skullport. A few depart Waterdeep for good (or until parents die or sicken and their own standing re. becoming head of the house improves, or until family members with whom they decidedly Dont Get Along perish), and a VERY few combine investment success in Waterdeep with adventuring forays that win them a daring, dangerously competent reputation.
The sort of scene you allude to, wherein young noble astonishes a parent with a battle-trophy produced as a surprise, has happened more often than one might think. More than one mounted dragon-head (or slightly less splendid monster equivalent) wall-adornment appeared on proud display as a result of such revelations.
Down the years, there have been scores of successful adventuring bands whose founding members were entirely or almost all younger sons and daughters of the city, seeking their fortunes. Most often, these are struggling middle-class merchant stock, seeking to improve their standing and make a living, but there are at least a dozen noble-led adventuring companies that have achieved legitimate success over the years (though I can think of none that shine just at the present; those whove read CITY OF SPLENDORS [SPOILER ALERT! SPOILER ALERT! SKIP TO END OF PARAGRAPH NOW TO AVOID SPOILER!] should take note that the public, Waterdeep-wide perception of the events therein would NOT crown the Gemcloaks as heroes or even successful adventurers; their actions are simply too little known and too misunderstood).
Among them are The Silver Swords (now semi-retired, this masked brotherhood was known for their silver [chromed] rapiers and half-masks, and reached their height of fame twenty summers ago), the Men of the Sabre (a large group of noble-led outlaws and wanderers active around eighty winters ago, who became hireswords and met various fates all over the Sword Coast North), and The Amalraes (this last one being an all-female group of revel-loving young lasses, described by a scribe of the time as gowned beauties all, led by Amalrae Brokengulf and Amalrae Eirontalar, that flourished almost a century ago).



So saith Ed, tireless spinner of Realmslore.
love to all,
THO
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Scarabeus
Seeker

Canada
27 Posts

Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  06:34:28  Show Profile  Visit Scarabeus's Homepage  Click to see Scarabeus's MSN Messenger address Send Scarabeus a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all. Ed deals with Asgetrions multi-part query: I was curious about how "specialized" craftsmen are in the Realms? Are there any ropemakers, for example, who only make and sell ropes,



Thanks Mr Greenwood. It's always inspiring to read replies like that. It helps pushing away a little futher our "modern day" way of thinking.

I don't know if it's been said before, but Asgetrions question made me think of a very good text (written by Ed I can guess) about Fylgard "the Fat". It depitcs the life of a ropemaker (and merchant)making a living in Waterdeep. There's an incredible amount of informations in this text about the City and the Sword Coast. It can be found in the City of Splendor boxed set (Who's Who in Waterdeep, Appendix One).

Ok, now I have a question. Ed can you tell us more about the Ancient Runetongue Mintiper learned in Dragon #187. I did not find any other reference about it. Can you append it to my Spellsinger question in queue. I guess it's related.

The Chondathan post made me think about ancient languages. Is there an explanation as to why Thorass was declared a dead language in the FRCS ? There's the mention that none of these languages has been a spoken living language in thousands of years. FR3 and Land of Intrigue clearly states that Thorass is still quite in use with the merchants of Amn. Did I missed something ? Thanks for any insight.

Merci beaucoup et bonne journe
- Scarabeus
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thom
Seeker

USA
69 Posts

Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  17:18:10  Show Profile  Visit thom's Homepage Send thom a Private Message
Hey THO, here's another question for you as a gamer in the original Realms. When a typical adventuring group goes tavern crawling in a town anywhere besides Cormyr, do they just waltz in fully armed & armored? All Plate mailed up, halbards and greatswords piled on their backs, wizards with their wands in their wand golf bag? This assumes the group is not trying to hide out or be inconspicuous, they're just wanting to spend their hard-earned gold.

Or do they "dress down" when going to your typical wharf dive; say only leathers, & smaller weapons? I'm asking because my group is heading into the main town of the campaign & they're asking what to expect...so what did the Knights typically do when going tavern crawling?? I can't image a typical tavern having a "dress code" for patrons - but I thought I'd check with you.

Thanks as always for any insights!
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thom
Seeker

USA
69 Posts

Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  17:31:20  Show Profile  Visit thom's Homepage Send thom a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

As for when and why Elminster decided to settle in Shadowdale, thats been covered briefly in existing Realmslore, but not in depth (yet). However, I Have Plans . . .


Hmmm..I seem to recall El settled in Shadowdale as a balance against the Zhentarim, and to watch over the Celestial Stair in the Lathander temple. Also as a favor to Sylune?
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
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Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  18:24:46  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
I know Ed dislikes rule questions and so he doesn't have to answer this. :)

But I had to ask: Is there any reason why bards in FR can't be lawful? I know in 1e and 2e there were about ten or so lawful bards but with the new rule changes in 3/3.5e it says that bardic ideals, etc, go against a lawful alignment and so I'm trying to find a justification for this change to FR NPCs.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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khorne
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1071 Posts

Posted - 13 Oct 2005 :  19:01:15  Show Profile  Visit khorne's Homepage  Click to see khorne's MSN Messenger address Send khorne a Private Message
Thanks Ed. I knew they weren`t all idiots. I just needed confirmation of the fact.

If I were a ranger, I would pick NDA for my favorite enemy
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5043 Posts

Posted - 14 Oct 2005 :  01:46:41  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello, all. Ed thinks its time to answer that last question from The Simbul (the scribe) about The Simbul (the character), to whit: in regards to the spell-storing gems carried in Phaeldara's hair, embedded in the Simbul's bedposts, and that she carried under her breasts in hopes of using them to heal Elminster (in ELMINSTER IN HELL), which of the following would you consider them to be closest to in terms of actual game features:
1. Attuned Gems, as described in MAGIC OF FAERUN
2. The focus component gems for a particularly long duration casting of one of her Simbul's Spell Matrix line of spells
3) Spell-storing gems that are the result perhaps of a variant of the Focal Stone spell used by Valamaradace or the Shalantha's Delicate Disk spell found in LOST EMPIRES OF FAERUN
4) Spellstars, or their 3E equivalents, as decribed in THE SEVEN SISTERS
5) something else entirely
Accordingly, Ed speaks:



The answer lies between your choices 3 and 5. Or to put things a little more clearly: the gems ARE spell-storing devices, that work differently from all of the first four options. They store multiple spells (cast into them), and the user can choose to convert all or some of these into healing energy (akin to silver fire), spellfire (ravening burn magic and/or organic things readily, melt inorganic things less readily energy), or to power up stored spells (or spells cast normally by the gem-user while holding the gem or carrying it in direct contact with their skin) to do additional damage OR have a longer range OR have a greater duration OR have a larger area of effect. The gems are sentient (containing the life-essence of a creature serving Mystra beyond death by adopting this existence by choice), and can speak aloud, see, hear, reason, speak mentally (at about a forty-foot range), and so advise the wearer (either to help them, or to further Mystras spread magic to all aims).
A Chosen of Mystra can command such a gem perfectly (in other words, the life-essence in them will obey them with adoring alacrity), and can even (mentally or verbally, within that 40-foot range) instruct it to emit (cast or discharge) its spells without their direct contact. So a Chosen could, for instance, employ a gem in this way to suddenly gain a spell-hurling ally that foes might not expect (so as to hurl spells at foes from both sides). The gems are, of course, very rare, and I want to keep some of their other powers under my hat for now.
Well, Ill let slip just one more: the gems can watch events transpiring in their presence and record them, as three-dimensional holographs to be played back any number of times later, for other beings to observe.



So saith Ed. Ah, yes. I know a bit more about these gems, but respect Eds keep it mysterious wishes. Cool, eh?
love,
THO
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Kuje
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USA
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Posted - 14 Oct 2005 :  18:36:56  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
This is going to be another one of those, you don't have to answer this if you don't want to type of questions since it deals with the afterlife. :) I'm asking about this because this is debated almost as much as the planar changes.

My question is this: Why does Kelemvor, or any of the past Faerun deities of the dead/death, get to judge the Faithless and False souls even if those souls never worshipped the Faerun "human" pantheon?

It doesn't make sense that Sehanine can't judge the elven Faithless and False, or that none of the other deities of the dead/death that are deities of the racial pantheons can't do the same with thier mortal races.

Why did TSR and WOTC decide that the "human" Faerun deity of the dead/death has that much influence over those souls and the afterlife?

It also makes no sense because the deities threatened to kill Midnight-Mystra for blocking the Weave but somehow they all rolled over and went all submissive when it involves who can judge the souls of their mortals and they allowed Kelemvor to have total power over the Faithless and False souls.

As a pagan, this bugs me. It's like having a Greek, who worshipped the Greek pantheon but never decided on a patron deity, being judged by the Celtic deity of the dead/death even though that Greek never worshipped any of the Celtic deities. And it makes no sense in a polytheism world, which FR is supposed to have...

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

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Edited by - Kuje on 14 Oct 2005 21:22:21
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Kuje
Great Reader

USA
7915 Posts

Posted - 14 Oct 2005 :  21:29:38  Show Profile  Send Kuje an AOL message  Click to see Kuje's MSN Messenger address  Send Kuje a Yahoo! Message Send Kuje a Private Message
Ed,

This one is from Bobsan about the Volo's Guide to Baldurs Gate sourcebook...

He's asking what this cover is to:

http://arsvictoria.com/Store/Product.asp?pid=790

I believe it's a mock up cover for Volo's Guide to Baldur's Gate II but he's sure that there was a Volo's Guide to Baldur's Gate and that it wasn't the one that was in the BG computer manual.

For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet and excite you... Books are full of the things that you don't get in real life - wonderful, lyrical language, for instance, right off the bat. - Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird

My Goodreads page: http://www.goodreads.com/kuje

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium
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