Candlekeep Forum
Candlekeep Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Forgotten Realms Journals
 Running the Realms
 Anti-Magic Material - Implications
 New Topic  New Poll New Poll
 Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Keldren
Seeker

Austria
16 Posts

Posted - 22 Jul 2019 :  07:33:28  Show Profile  Visit Keldren's Homepage  Send Keldren an ICQ Message Send Keldren a Private Message  Reply with Quote  Delete Topic
I have been toying with the idea of introducing Meteoric Iron as a material with Anti-Magic properties to my realms. It would be completely inert and immune against arcane magic.

Meteoric Iron because it is fairly widespread on the surface in the form of meteor craters and therefore affordable. It also represents an outside influence that is alien to mortals and gods alike.

My reasons for introducing an Anti-Magic material is to reduce the influence of arcane casters in the setting (no arcane spell protects you against a meteoric iron crossbow bolt between the eyes) as they are already too dominant in my eyes.

What do you think would be the implications on the setting?

P.S.
I am aware of Chardalyns, but they cannot serve the same purpose as they store magic and are quite fragile as well.

"No sane human would try to wash ink beats with ink, or oil beads with oil. Only blood shall always be washed with blood"

Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
32289 Posts

Posted - 22 Jul 2019 :  10:12:37  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Pretty sure meteoric iron exists in the setting, already.

But it's never going to be affordable or have an impact on the number of spellcasters unless there's a constant rain of the stuff -- which would also mean homes and businesses and such are routinely getting hit.

The Realms is a high-magic setting, which means a lot of casters. To me, it's one of the elements of the setting, and it's not something I would try to remove.

And honestly, spellcasters are still greatly outnumbered by noncasters. Even looking at city descriptions and such -- you'll see a city with tens of thousands of inhabitants, and only a handful of mages powerful enough to be notable.

Lastly, other than the source, there's no functional difference between arcane magic and divine magic... So if you make an anti-magical material common enough to reduce the number of mages, it's going to have a greater impact on the number of clerics. There are far, far more clerics in the Realms than wizards.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Editor and scribe for The Candlekeep Compendium

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!

Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 22 Jul 2019 10:15:22
Go to Top of Page

Keldren
Seeker

Austria
16 Posts

Posted - 22 Jul 2019 :  14:34:28  Show Profile  Visit Keldren's Homepage  Send Keldren an ICQ Message Send Keldren a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Indeed, Meteoric Iron is listed in a 2nd edition source book as Starmetal as I recall. Other materials are of course possible. Demand would be certainly be high and drive prices up. Metal is however fairly durable and would only rarely be totally destroyed. I once read that on Earth the total supply of Meteoric Iron amounts to about 450-500 tons, which would be a starting point.

The Realms are indeed a high-magic setting and removing spellcasters without fundamentally altering its character is difficult. This change would however not remove casters but empower non-casters. Certain races, like dwarves, could for example compete with drow on a more even footing. I would imagine that we would not see as many battlefield casters in armies, or rather more in support roles. It also encourages a more careful approach to combat, which I find quite realistic.

You are correct in that divine magic should be affected in the same way as a arcane magic.

"No sane human would try to wash ink beats with ink, or oil beads with oil. Only blood shall always be washed with blood"
Go to Top of Page

TBeholder
Master of Realmslore

1856 Posts

Posted - 22 Jul 2019 :  20:27:18  Show Profile Send TBeholder a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Voloís Guide to All Things Magical has 3 different materials of meteoric origin.
quote:
Agni Mani: This black, irregularly shaped glasslike ornamental stone has fallen from the sky in meteoritic form to crash
among the sands of Anauroch and other FaerŻnian deserts. It is used in garments and the crafting of magical items because in all
blasts (such as the explosions caused by fireballs and beads of force), agni manis vaporize but protect beings wearing or carrying
them by negating 1d4 points of damage per agni mani stone.

Skydrop: The common name given in the Realms to clear or lightly colored tektite material, especially fragments of glass of
celestial (meteoritic) origin found in the vast shifting sands of Anauroch and other deserts. Such semiprecious stones are usually
buffed and polished to sparkling clarity and fixed in claw mounts to be worn as pendants or teardrop earrings. They render any beings
touching, carrying, or wearing them immune to petrification.

Star Metal: Star metal is another name for metallic meteorites. These hardstones are extremely rare and usually no larger
than a humanís thumb in size, though larger examples the size of an ogreís head or bigger have been found. Smiths have mastered
the technique of forging star metal by adding small amounts of alloys of more common metals to make weapons of great strength
and durability, ideal for taking enchantments. Combined with alloys such as steel, star metal adds to the sharpness and flexible
temper of bladed weapons and is reputed to heighten the strength and duration of all enchantments laid upon blades of which it is a
part (though I have not yet been able to learn anything definite about such matters). Because of this, star metal ore is valued in
the thousands of gold pieces when obtained in large enough chunks to be worked. Star metal is classified as a hardstone
because its innate value lies primarily in its transformed state, after it is melted and forged into weapons or armor. In addition to
being so transformed, tiny pieces of star metal are sometimes sliced and polished for inlay work.

People never wonder How the world goes round -Helloween
And even I make no pretense Of having more than common sense -R.W.Wood
It's not good, Eric. It's a gazebo. -Ed Whitchurch
Go to Top of Page

Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
32289 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  02:51:35  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Keldren

Indeed, Meteoric Iron is listed in a 2nd edition source book as Starmetal as I recall. Other materials are of course possible. Demand would be certainly be high and drive prices up. Metal is however fairly durable and would only rarely be totally destroyed. I once read that on Earth the total supply of Meteoric Iron amounts to about 450-500 tons, which would be a starting point.

The Realms are indeed a high-magic setting and removing spellcasters without fundamentally altering its character is difficult. This change would however not remove casters but empower non-casters. Certain races, like dwarves, could for example compete with drow on a more even footing. I would imagine that we would not see as many battlefield casters in armies, or rather more in support roles. It also encourages a more careful approach to combat, which I find quite realistic.




I don't see why there is a need to empower non-casters. They can already do plenty that mages can't -- like take a hit! -- and they dramatically outnumber mages by a huge margin. As noted earlier, in canon material, we have cities with tens of thousands of inhabitants and just a handful of noteworthy mages.

When it's 1000 to 1 odds, helping out the 1000 is overkill.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Editor and scribe for The Candlekeep Compendium

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
Go to Top of Page

Demzer
Senior Scribe

704 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  09:34:17  Show Profile Send Demzer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

I don't see why there is a need to empower non-casters. They can already do plenty that mages can't -- like take a hit! -- and they dramatically outnumber mages by a huge margin. As noted earlier, in canon material, we have cities with tens of thousands of inhabitants and just a handful of noteworthy mages.

When it's 1000 to 1 odds, helping out the 1000 is overkill.



It's a fairly common misconception when all the novels and even the statted NPCs of game supplements are full of supposedly omniscient and invincible magic users of some kind. The full power of an archmage that knows exactly which situation he's getting into is often mistaken for their every-moment-of-the-day battle readiness and capabilities, which is wrong even for the ultra powerful ones (just note how mechanic-wise even the Chosens have to resort to ad-hoc solutions like "I'm immune because Mystra" to prevent common anti-wizard tactics from trashing them).

Then you have random scenes where the old man naked and without access to magic beats down several trained soldiers and you get this distorted image where the Realms are the land of the mages and everyone else is a chump and you think you need to give everyone else a boost.

If you are the DM you can easily correct this misconception with good practice (and assassins) and you can make your players realise the error in this misconception with tavern tales of wizardly successes and failures that better reflect the actual game balance of your own world.
Go to Top of Page

Gary Dallison
Great Reader

United Kingdom
4672 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  10:41:23  Show Profile Send Gary Dallison a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I prefer to limit the power of magic through the greater power of economics. Granted I have attempted to alter the dnd economy into a working approximate model of medieval England (unskilled earn cp a day, professionals earn sp a day, nobles and successful merchants earn gp a day). Casting a spell costs 1sp per spell level in unspecified material components (no need to keep track of them, just pay the amount), so running round like a magical cannon firing spells left and right is a sure way to go bankrupt.

Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions Candlekeep Archive
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 1
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 2
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 3
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 4
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 5
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 6
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 7
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 8
Forgotten Realms Alternate Dimensions: Issue 9

Alternate Realms Site
Go to Top of Page

LordofBones
Senior Scribe

937 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  13:53:09  Show Profile Send LordofBones a Private Message  Reply with Quote
That's kind of ignoring that an enterprising wizard can become an economic mogul with a handful of spells.

Introducing another new antimagic macguffin isn't going to help, other than to screw mailman/direct damage casters over even more. The most powerful schools of magic in the game are Conjuration and Transmutation, after all.
Go to Top of Page

sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
8207 Posts

Posted - 23 Jul 2019 :  15:58:25  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
What Demzer said is true, moreso now than say 2nd edition. However, if you want an extremely anti-magic material... from VGtatM there was an metal known as Hizagkuur. It was extremely hard to craft, once crafted couldn't be reshaped, and reflected all magic cast at it 100% back at the source. Now, that doesn't mean that it can bypass wards such as stoneskin in 2nd edition, but it does basically introduce an "anti-magic metal" that might be capable of sheathing another metal (such as say adamantine that in later editions CAN bypass stoneskin). So, maybe if a person were SO worried about it they could make an adamantine crossbow bolt that is sheathed in hizagkuur and maybe this allows it to get past things like "protection from missiles" or any other affect which might magically cause an arrow to miss, while the adamantine core allows it to "pierce" effects that make the target harder to penetrate.


Said things should be rare as hell, and I specifically mention it because meteoric metals are more often than not portrayed as MORE magic, not anti-magical, so if you want to introduce such, then do so with something already mentioned. Also, when used in a weapon where its sheathing something else, it should only last a limited time (i.e. when on an arrow/bolt, there would be no reusing it, etc..).


Here is from VGtatM


Hizagkuur: This extremely rare white metal is named for its long-ago dwarf discoverer and is found only in scattered, but very rich, deposits deep in the Underdark as a soft, greenish-gray claylike ore or a flaky mud. Its preparation is complex, and it is a secret known only to a very few senior dwarven smiths and elders. If even a single element of the process is wrong, the hizagkuur remains mud and not a usable metal.

If successfully transformed into a metal, hizagkuur must be cast, worked, or forged into final form within a day and thereafter can never be worked again. (If an item made of hizagkuur is broken, only magical mendings accomplished by limited wish or wish spells can repair it.) If hizagkuur is left untouched for that 24 hours, it becomes inert and unworkable unless either a wish or limited wish is cast and properly worded to allow a second chance at working it.
Hizagkuur is unsuitable for use in the crafting of magical items or items that are to be worn because once it has cooled and hardened after being worked, it reflects all magic cast at it 100 percent back at the source and also deals 2d12 points of electrical damage per touch (or per round of continued contact) to all beings coming into contact with it. It sees most use as a sheathing for fortress gates, vault doors, and seals on coffers or hatches of crucial importance.
Items made primarily of hizagkuur automatically succeed in all item saving throws vs. normal fire, cold, and electricity. They receive a +6 bonus to all item saving throws vs. magical fire and lightning and a +1 bonus to all item saving throws vs. acid, crushing blow, fall, and disintegration.



Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
Go to Top of Page

Keldren
Seeker

Austria
16 Posts

Posted - 24 Jul 2019 :  18:14:41  Show Profile  Visit Keldren's Homepage  Send Keldren an ICQ Message Send Keldren a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Demzer has it right. While casters are certainly not invincible, they are in my opinion overepresented compared to non-casters. I have thought about it and realized that there is a surprising number of already existing materials (Hizagkuur for example, thank you Sleyvas) and methods to give non-casters more of a chance in direct confrontations. I may use a combination of these instead of introducing a new material. Many of these are known to only limited individuals or groups, but that could be expanded. Hizagkuur could fill the role of general purpose anti-magic material (rare and expensive, but could bypass magical defenses).

Chardalyns - (Netheril: Empire of Magic) - brittle stones that absorb magic
Hizagkuur (Volos Guide to all things Magical) - metal that reflects magic
Faerzress (Underdark) - objects may protect an area against divination and teleporation
Dead Magic Poisons (Dungeon 75) - plants grown in dead magic areas; deadly and not curable with magic
Dead Magic Gems (Siege of Darkness)- these may be extraplanar in nature and not native to Faerun.
Lead - protects objects and areas against divination magic
Witchweed Stick (Lords of Darkness) - smoke that disrupts the concentration of casters

Potions of Magic Resistance (Drow of the Underdark) - alchemical potion that confers magic resistance
Arrows of Dispelling (Baldurs Gate Series) - arrows that automatically dispel magical effects on hit
Inquisitor Kit (Baldurs Gate Series) - Paladin class kit; specializes in finding and eliminating practitioners of evil magic

Divine:
Gond - Technology, Golems and Magic Immune Constructs
Shar - Weave Disruptions, Artificial Dead Magic Zones - Rite of Unwinding)
Helm (Faith & Avatars) - Mace of Odo specialty prayer can absorbs spells targeted at the caster
Azuth (Counselors & Kings Series) - Policing of Wizards; Mage Hound class, creating Jordaini Viziers that are naturally magic resistant
Kiaransalee (City of the Spider Queen)- Weave Disruption of the Undying Temple
House Karanok (Lords of Darkness) - Magic Hating Family
Curses (Prince of Ravens) - anti magic curse that makes an individual magic immune

Monsters:
Beholders - anti magic central eye
Laraken - magic devouring outsiders
Nishruu - misty creatures, eat magic
Hakeshar - more potent form of a Nishruu

"No sane human would try to wash ink beats with ink, or oil beads with oil. Only blood shall always be washed with blood"

Edited by - Keldren on 24 Jul 2019 18:15:11
Go to Top of Page

Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
32289 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  03:57:32  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Keldren

Demzer has it right. While casters are certainly not invincible, they are in my opinion overepresented compared to non-casters.


They're not over-represented, they're just more noteworthy. As I've already commented, looking at the source info we have, there are many, many examples of communities where notable wizards are outnumbered by non-wizards by more than a 1000 to 1 ratio. If anything, wizards are UNDER-represented, not over.

They seem more prominent than they are because no one pays attention to the guy that can pick a pocket, the woman that swings a sharp piece of metal really well, or the guy that prays a lot. No, all of those folks get overlooked by the guy who almost never takes his nose out of a book, but when he does, he wiggles his fingers and mutters some nonsense and a bunch of people way over there are suddenly fried.

Magic is sexy. That's where all the focus goes.

Saying there are too many wizards in the setting because that's what the focus is on is like saying there are too many beautiful 20-somethings in the US, because that's all you see on TV and in movies. The carefully-chosen and presented samples do not represent the whole.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Editor and scribe for The Candlekeep Compendium

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
Go to Top of Page

Demzer
Senior Scribe

704 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  09:52:49  Show Profile Send Demzer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

The carefully-chosen and presented samples do not represent the whole.



That's exactly the definition of over-represented, but we are arguing semantics.
The point is you see a lot of arcane casters fully statted out in the sourcebooks or being the protagonists of novels and novel lines while the other classes get only the one liners descriptions, even when, as you say, arcane casters are a minority in-setting.

A while back we had a thread somewhere in these halls searching for high and epic level rogues of the Realms and there were surprisingly few mentioned in official material, with only an handful having full stats (if ever), across all editions.
Sword-swingers and company fare a little bit better because they're the iconic "leadership figure" of fantasy and D&D but even then we are presented with as many of them as arcane casters while in truth the fighting population outnumbers the spellcasting population of Toril by a few orders of magnitudes (I suppose).
Divine casters, which are on a comparable power scale to arcane casters, fare even worse, in a world where the gods are very real and temples and shrines are everywhere, yet only few of them get the spotlight.

That's why the misconception of arcane casters ruling Faerun exists but it's a misconception when you dig a little bit deeper into the setting.
Go to Top of Page

Starshade
Learned Scribe

Norway
241 Posts

Posted - 25 Jul 2019 :  11:21:46  Show Profile Send Starshade a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I see two issues, which are unrelated:
the world's lore. This is what is discussed.

The mechanical effect of anti magic. The game is built around magic for a reason, and editing it to remove magic is hard without making a new version of D&D.
There is two thought I have. If its a plot item, end game item the Players need to finish the storyline; great.

I its the world which is the issue:
Well, do you know second edition D&D? try look at the real AD&D rules from that era, especially wizards. About as scary at level 1 as hobos living under a bridge, and about as useful. The later rulesets, 3.5 4ed and further 5e bends the game more toward fun for ppl playing computer games, and wanting to play that wizard guy in D&D from level one. Not waiting 3 months to play real wizard.

Imho, you could go backwards in time. pick up the 3 essential books and run AD&D in FR. A lot of the High Magic lore IS from that era, too. Take Elminster, he's an AD&D character, same with Drizzt, originally. Not from the World of Warcraft gen which picked up 4th edition book and loved the wizard pumping magic missiles holding a glass orb. There is a D&D for everyone.

Edited by - Starshade on 25 Jul 2019 11:27:00
Go to Top of Page

Ayrik
Great Reader

Canada
6836 Posts

Posted - 07 Sep 2019 :  15:23:46  Show Profile Send Ayrik a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Volo's Guide to All Things Magical describes magic-related properties of real and fantastic metals.
Forgotten Realms Adventures mentions Starmetal on a treasure generation table near the back pages. It only says it's a small fragment and it's worth 10000GP, nothing more.

The proposed metal is basically just dark ore. Maybe it's an Elemental Metal from the Negative Energy Plane. Maybe "meteoric iron" is just a layman's term and it's properly named
"Nullium" or "Pandemonium" or "Aquarium". Doesn't change what it is or what it does.

A metal which completely blocks or absorbs all magic, is immune and impervious to magic.
Doesn't seem any more mage-breaking or game-breaking than a Dead-Magic zone or Anti-Magic Shell. It's passively unaffected by magic, it doesn't project a radius, it wouldn't fully protect anything it doesn't fully enclose.

People use other metals to negate some magics - like Volo's metal plating to make a castle gate impervious to lightning. People mix the blood of dragons and exotic fantasy beasts into mortars and cements to proof structures against scrying and teleports.
Such metals are incredibly rare and costly. Such exotic beast bits require finding and killing dangerously exotic beasts. And they're comparatively inferior. So it's reasonable to expect the superior metal would cost far and be even harder to obtain.

You obviously wouldn't be able to get enough to make a castle. A rich dwarf mining a rich lode might barely get enough adamantium to make a suit of armor over his lifetime of labour... and maybe an entire swarven stronghold could get an equivalent amount of this dark ore instead... if so then you can just imagine the price they'll charge to part with it. So no magic-cancelling armor suits. Indeed, if this metal isn't as strong, flexible, hard, and durable as other metals then it might be unsuitable for armor anyhow (especially since it can't accept any enchantments to make it resist raw physical damage, wear, and tear).

Weapons? Probably not, for the same reason no armors.
Unless you need special-purpose niche weaponry, arrowheads which can fire through a prismatic walls or whatever.

Shields? All the same as armors and weapons. Except you can also pretend some Captain America.

Tools? Maybe. They'd be awesomely useful at performing awesomely useless tasks. How about magic-impervious pliers or grabbers or cutters which could safely reach into a sphere of annihilation and find... nothing there.

Jewellery and trinkets. Maybe. Perhaps a helmet liner which blocks magical-based mental attacks, ESP, etc. Thieves might line clothing, compartments, and containers with magic-blocking metal foil/mesh for all sorts of reasons. Lockpicks and other contraband gizmos might be made of this metal (assuming it has suitable material properties). Traps and mechanisms might also benefit from magic-blocking.

Coins made of magic-blocking metal seem like the ultimate in non-counterfeitable, non-traceable, black market currency.

But all told this metal doesn't seem game-breaky to me at all. Mostly because so many similar (perhaps better) metals are already available. Yes, it could easily be abused by munchkins - the same munchkins who already abuse the game with magic.
And there's always rust monsters out there.

[/Ayrik]
Go to Top of Page

Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
32289 Posts

Posted - 07 Sep 2019 :  16:15:06  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ayrik

But all told this metal doesn't seem game-breaky to me at all. Mostly because so many similar (perhaps better) metals are already available. Yes, it could easily be abused by munchkins - the same munchkins who already abuse the game with magic.
And there's always rust monsters out there.



It's not the existence of the material that's the issue. It's what the OP wants -- there to be so much of it that the number of arcane casters in the setting gets dramatically reduced.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Editor and scribe for The Candlekeep Compendium

I am the Giant Space Hamster of Ill Omen!
Go to Top of Page

Ayrik
Great Reader

Canada
6836 Posts

Posted - 08 Sep 2019 :  00:41:44  Show Profile Send Ayrik a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A "fairly widespread" and "affordable" magic-blocker?

It would obviously hinder the mages and beef up the fighters. Make lich-hunting expeditions or dragonslaying safaris more viable.

I don't think it would break the game, it would actually make things more interesting, it would add some rock-paper-scissor considerations to otherwise overpowered spellcasting PCs (and add another weapon to the warrior's arsenal, make dwarves and castles great again, make armies and monsters threatening again, give some much-needed love to thief classes and wimpy demihuman races).
I do agree that it would break the setting. High-magic and high-fantasy is what the Realms is all about... and dangerously disruptive technologies (like smokepowder or blueshine) tend to attract all sorts of problems. A metal like this was never widespread and affordable in the Realms before, too many mages would work hard to see it never does - remember that they can hire or conjure nonmagical goons, their magics can't directly affect the metal they but can affect everything around, above, and beneath it. And rust monsters.

[/Ayrik]

Edited by - Ayrik on 08 Sep 2019 04:33:47
Go to Top of Page

TBeholder
Master of Realmslore

1856 Posts

Posted - 08 Sep 2019 :  20:34:19  Show Profile Send TBeholder a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There already are magic-resistant materials: some of the stuff from Helmlands, per novels (Cormyr, Floodgate and something else IIRC).

quote:
Originally posted by Ayrik

It would obviously hinder the mages and beef up the fighters. Make lich-hunting expeditions or dragonslaying safaris more viable.

More of the other way around, unless it also helps against swarms of draining non-corporeals and dragon breath (and makes julienne fries, too), or at least doesn't help to break respective protections.

People never wonder How the world goes round -Helloween
And even I make no pretense Of having more than common sense -R.W.Wood
It's not good, Eric. It's a gazebo. -Ed Whitchurch
Go to Top of Page

sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
8207 Posts

Posted - 08 Sep 2019 :  21:12:34  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ayrik

Volo's Guide to All Things Magical describes magic-related properties of real and fantastic metals.
Forgotten Realms Adventures mentions Starmetal on a treasure generation table near the back pages. It only says it's a small fragment and it's worth 10000GP, nothing more.

The proposed metal is basically just dark ore. Maybe it's an Elemental Metal from the Negative Energy Plane. Maybe "meteoric iron" is just a layman's term and it's properly named
"Nullium" or "Pandemonium" or "Aquarium". Doesn't change what it is or what it does.

A metal which completely blocks or absorbs all magic, is immune and impervious to magic.
Doesn't seem any more mage-breaking or game-breaking than a Dead-Magic zone or Anti-Magic Shell. It's passively unaffected by magic, it doesn't project a radius, it wouldn't fully protect anything it doesn't fully enclose.

People use other metals to negate some magics - like Volo's metal plating to make a castle gate impervious to lightning. People mix the blood of dragons and exotic fantasy beasts into mortars and cements to proof structures against scrying and teleports.
Such metals are incredibly rare and costly. Such exotic beast bits require finding and killing dangerously exotic beasts. And they're comparatively inferior. So it's reasonable to expect the superior metal would cost far and be even harder to obtain.

You obviously wouldn't be able to get enough to make a castle. A rich dwarf mining a rich lode might barely get enough adamantium to make a suit of armor over his lifetime of labour... and maybe an entire swarven stronghold could get an equivalent amount of this dark ore instead... if so then you can just imagine the price they'll charge to part with it. So no magic-cancelling armor suits. Indeed, if this metal isn't as strong, flexible, hard, and durable as other metals then it might be unsuitable for armor anyhow (especially since it can't accept any enchantments to make it resist raw physical damage, wear, and tear).

Weapons? Probably not, for the same reason no armors.
Unless you need special-purpose niche weaponry, arrowheads which can fire through a prismatic walls or whatever.

Shields? All the same as armors and weapons. Except you can also pretend some Captain America.

Tools? Maybe. They'd be awesomely useful at performing awesomely useless tasks. How about magic-impervious pliers or grabbers or cutters which could safely reach into a sphere of annihilation and find... nothing there.

Jewellery and trinkets. Maybe. Perhaps a helmet liner which blocks magical-based mental attacks, ESP, etc. Thieves might line clothing, compartments, and containers with magic-blocking metal foil/mesh for all sorts of reasons. Lockpicks and other contraband gizmos might be made of this metal (assuming it has suitable material properties). Traps and mechanisms might also benefit from magic-blocking.

Coins made of magic-blocking metal seem like the ultimate in non-counterfeitable, non-traceable, black market currency.

But all told this metal doesn't seem game-breaky to me at all. Mostly because so many similar (perhaps better) metals are already available. Yes, it could easily be abused by munchkins - the same munchkins who already abuse the game with magic.
And there's always rust monsters out there.



The one big thing I see out of this is "why does it have to be a metal". I mean, if the point is to drop spellcaster's defenses... hell Maztican hishna crafters (who were crafters mind you and not necessarily casters) might be able to adapt a beholder's central eye onto some kind of mounts that a warrior could attach to his breastplate or shield. They might be able to take a disenchanter's long snout, leatherize it, and turn it into a whip. It kind of gets rather boring that everything has to be "there's a special metal from space that does that" (which that being said, I will say I fall prey to the same concept at times).

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
Go to Top of Page

Ayrik
Great Reader

Canada
6836 Posts

Posted - 09 Sep 2019 :  02:16:56  Show Profile Send Ayrik a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I suppose it wouldn't have to be metal. It could be pretty much anything.

But castle gates plated with beholder eyelashes or woven fern fronds just ain't cool. Armor and weapons made from wooden planks or matted eagle feathers just ain't cool. Unless of course you're in a (Maztica) setting where they haven't invented metalcraft and everyone still wears animal totems, lol.

But even if the thing is a metal it still isn't necessarily a very good metal for making arms.
A full suit of plate made from lead might block radiation but it won't do much of anything vs a sword or axe made of common low-grade iron. A blade made from silver might be great vs lycanthropes but it would be cut apart by a blade made of bronze. There's reasons why fine steel is preferred over other metals. There's reasons why mithril and adamant are preferred over fine dteel.

[/Ayrik]
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  New Poll New Poll
 Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Candlekeep Forum © 1999-2019 Candlekeep.com Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000