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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30811 Posts

Posted - 07 Feb 2018 :  05:23:14  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dalor Darden

GAZ 13, the Shadow Elves

There ya go MT!



That was one of the many books included in a Humble Bundle, last year. Books 1-14 of the GAZ series (I think that was all of them).

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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
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USA
30811 Posts

Posted - 07 Feb 2018 :  05:32:02  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Shadow Elves were Mystara's (OD&D) version of drow, except they were albinos (like Ed's drow were, before TSR got ahold of them and said, "Oh no! Only 'black things' can be bad!")



My first exposure to dark elves was in Raymond E Feist's Riftwar Saga, and I still love his take on it.

On the main world his stories are set on, Midkemia, there were two known types of elves: regular elves (eledhel) and the Brotherhood of the Dark Path (moredhel). Physically, the main difference between them was that elves were usually lighter of hair than moredhel -- though that wasn't an absolute.

The background was that the two types of elves were essentially one race. In millennia past, they were both slaves to a godlike race called the Valheru. When the Valheru left, the elves decided to stick with the woods they'd always lived in. The moredhel decided to try to claim the power of their lost masters -- hence, they followed the Dark Path.

A lot of moredhel live in mountains (on them, like anyone else, not actually inside them, like dwarves), but many also live in the forests.

An eledhel and a moredhel can tell on sight if an unknown elf-type is eledhel or moredhel. It's an instinctive thing.

And the real kicker is that some moredhel managed to leave their kin, and rejoin the elves. The elven Spellweavers do this ritual, and while there is no change to the appearance of the Returned moredhel, suddenly everyone is looking at an eledhel, not a moredhel.

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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
15245 Posts

Posted - 07 Feb 2018 :  05:32:37  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am fairly certain drow albinism was touched upon in the original Drow of the Underdark as well. I believe that mention - plus knowledge that Ed's drow were white - and the uber-kewl dark elves from the Hellboy 2 movie which had just come out back then, is what made me want to create the 'pockets' of albino drow living in the Underdark.

I also use the Rockseer elves from Night Below - the live under the High Moor (remnants of the Green Elves of Miyeritar who followed their dark elven cousins below after the disaster). I've even managed to tweak my maps to to sync-up perfectly with the ones in that product (it fits perfectly just to the right {east} of the the NE corner of the High Moor). When you scale it down, its a very tiny area compared to Faerūn.

So nobody liked my idea of merging the original Shadar-kai with the shadow elf stuff from Ravenloft, and then saying Gwydion was a Shade, and he used them as mercenaries, and then the two groups were separated for so long they became two different kinds of Shadar-kai? I thought that was a perfct 'fix'. Ah, well. You could always leave-out the RL/Gwydion stuff and just use the 'they were mercenaries' bit still. After a time, the employed soldiers just became more citizens of Shade, while the rest remained... something else.

I don't want them to be human, honestly. Malaugrym were already human, as were the Shades. How many human-turned-shadow groups do we need?

Hmph... here's a thought. What if 'elf' is just something generated by a plane itself (a 'citizen' of the plane, as it were)? Thus, Fey become fairy elves, Shadar-Kai become Shadow-Elves, etc... you could have elemental elves, and you could have fiendish elves (I'm thinking maybe thats what Baatorans were). And our regular, good old fashioned 'Sylvan' Elves are just the Prime material Variety. Thus, Elves are like vermin - you just can't get rid of them. They're part of the planer structure. Actually, you could invert that and say 'Fey' are the planer race, that is omnipresent, and 'elves' are just the Prime version. that way, we could include all the smaller fey as well (which could be fun - you could just use the Big (Eladrin), medium (Urchin), and tiny groups and apply planer templates to them, to get any type of fey you wished. Thus, imps become a type of infernal brownie, mephits become elemental sprites, etc, etc. That could work.

Of course, we'd probably have to wait until 6e now.

So, like, end of next year, maybe?

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 10 Feb 2018 01:38:32
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BadCatMan
Learned Scribe

Australia
307 Posts

Posted - 07 Feb 2018 :  06:13:02  Show Profile Send BadCatMan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I fixed shadar-kai by dividing them neatly in twain – why would I want to make them more complicated?

There's a teeny mention of rare bone-white drow albinos in the original The Drow of the Underdark (referenced in my article), but that does no more than say they exist, because of course they must.

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Edited by - BadCatMan on 07 Feb 2018 06:14:11
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Lord Karsus
Great Reader

USA
3067 Posts

Posted - 08 Feb 2018 :  05:27:27  Show Profile  Send Lord Karsus an AOL message Send Lord Karsus a Private Message  Reply with Quote
-The Realmsification of Rockseer Elves was a good one that we did. One of the articles that I liked the most.

(A Tri-Partite Arcanist Who Has Forgotten More Than Most Will Ever Know)

Elves of Faerūn
Vol I- The Elves of Faerūn
Vol. III- Spells of the Elves
Vol. VI- Mechanical Compendium
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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 08 Feb 2018 :  23:36:00  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I do like the idea of Shadar Kai being born in Arborea being Celestials.
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CorellonsDevout
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USA
2122 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2018 :  01:10:20  Show Profile  Send CorellonsDevout an AOL message Send CorellonsDevout a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow, this is all news to me (th3 shadar(er)-kai being elves). I thought I knew my elf lore. Guess not. Then again, I don't have some of the earlier stuff, and I don't own all the sourcebooks. I pre-ordered MTOF, just for lore purposes.

Sweet water and light laughter

Edited by - CorellonsDevout on 10 Feb 2018 01:28:17
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sfdragon
Great Reader

2134 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2018 :  06:02:51  Show Profile Send sfdragon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I wont preorder this book and wont buy it before I look at it.

why is being a wizard like being a drow? both are likely to find a dagger in the back from a rival or one looking to further his own goals, fame and power


My FR fan fiction
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Balmar Foghaven
Seeker

Canada
28 Posts

Posted - 10 Feb 2018 :  07:05:37  Show Profile Send Balmar Foghaven a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm hoping they touch upon the Daemonfey in this book, though I find it unlikely. Still, I'd rather have something official to use rather than blending variations of the elven and tiefling racial features.

"Despair not, for in the end all things shall work out for the best - in at least one timeline."
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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 12 Feb 2018 :  18:29:55  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Balmar Foghaven

I'm hoping they touch upon the Daemonfey in this book, though I find it unlikely. Still, I'd rather have something official to use rather than blending variations of the elven and tiefling racial features.



Actually I think its very likely they are in. The book features new demons/devils/yugoloths, the Blood War, a Chapter on the Elves and their conflicts, and Elf based monsters, and Cambion variants so thematically the Fey'ri which are basically Elvish Cambions, would fit in to all of that with ease.
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
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Posted - 12 Feb 2018 :  19:14:27  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I had thought about the fact they are doing BOTH 'ancient elven history' (as in, antideluvian {pre-Realms} Elven history), AND that they're doing the Blood War as well, and you would think its a natural tie-in.

Buuuuuut... everything is going to be in its own, neat little 'compartmentalized' chapter. It sounds very much like how Lost Empires of Faerūn was done, and my biggest complaint (perhaps my ONLY complaint) with that book is that each section was 'unto itself'. They didn't touch upon the other sections at all, which makes the 'history' feel very artificial (because history is nothing more than a series of 'ripples in a pond' that effect EVERYTHING else). They do this because its a game, and they need to keep the game material focused, so I understand the approach, but I fail to appreciate it.

To me, its like the difference between DC comics and Marvel comics back when I was a kid (70's). DC comics were VERY compartmentalized - they were each their own thing. You never even heard any of the individual heroes mention the JLA in their own books. Hell, in one Flash comic the world was being invaded by aliens, and he never summoned the JLA! It was at that point I started to realized how stupid DC was (back then), and I had already started reading some Marvel (thanks to my older brother). Marvel had this sneaky way of forcing you to read their other titles - they did crossovers, where the story would begin in one hero's book, and end anther title. The beauty of that is that you could read both halves of a story the same month. The down side was that I eventually found myself having to buy every single Marvel title - something you didn't have to do with DC.

And I LOVED it. It felt like a REAL world (well, except for all the flying people and eye-lasers, LOL). Everything that happened in Marvel had perturbations that affected everything else. That's what makes a setting 'come alive'. That's what Ed Greenwood knew; why he dropped all those delicious 'Red Slippers'* into the lore. And its precisely what 3e slowly pulled away from, and went with a very stagnant, 'factual', compartmentalized approach. Ed's living, breathing world became more like a photo-album. You got 'snapshots', rather than a story.

And, I fear, that's precisely what Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes is going to be like. Plus, its all from the world-view of a dude from Oerth (GH) - why the heck would he even know about Realms-specific lore, let alone discuss it? Its just not going to happen, IMHO.


*Red Slippers is a concept (and literally device) that has been used by many authors but never given a name, AFAIK, before Dennis McKiernan wrote his book Red Slippers: More tales of Mithgar. The concept is that you name-drop stuff all throughout your work, be it places, personages, or things, to make your world seem more real, more 'alive'. Lovecraft did it with aplomb. So much so other authors picked-up on his Red Slippers (The Necrominicon, etc) and used them in their works. McKiernan came up with the name because he used to reference "the peculiar case of the Red Slipper", an event mentioned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in his Sherlock Holmes novels, but was never a real story. It was never elaborated on - it was just an offhand mention to make the world seem 'bigger' than just the cases we read about. And people LOOK for "the peculiar case of the Red Slipper", because fans want to know more. It became real to them. But there was no such story. It was just an in-world reference. So, although Mr. McKiernan may not have brought much originality to the table in his body of works, he understood good writing, and gave us a name for something that's been around a very long time. His book with that in the title? That was him finally explaining some of HIS 'Red Slippers' (which, unfortunately, defeats the whole purpose, eh?) As Ed once told the TSR design team - "for every one of (my) plothooks you use up, create three new ones". He understood that Red Slippers need to be left lying around. That when a world looks too 'neat & tidy' it begins look artificial.

Because here at CK, that's almost all we do. We try to find what those Red Slippers belong to. This site probably wouldn't still be around if it wasn't for them. This is why I meet new lore like MToF with both glee and trepidation. I WANT to know all the details, but a small part of me wants to keep wanting... that's just human nature.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 12 Feb 2018 19:20:46
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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 12 Feb 2018 :  23:46:11  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

I had thought about the fact they are doing BOTH 'ancient elven history' (as in, antideluvian {pre-Realms} Elven history), AND that they're doing the Blood War as well, and you would think its a natural tie-in.

Buuuuuut... everything is going to be in its own, neat little 'compartmentalized' chapter. It sounds very much like how Lost Empires of Faerūn was done, and my biggest complaint (perhaps my ONLY complaint) with that book is that each section was 'unto itself'. They didn't touch upon the other sections at all, which makes the 'history' feel very artificial (because history is nothing more than a series of 'ripples in a pond' that effect EVERYTHING else). They do this because its a game, and they need to keep the game material focused, so I understand the approach, but I fail to appreciate it.

To me, its like the difference between DC comics and Marvel comics back when I was a kid (70's). DC comics were VERY compartmentalized - they were each their own thing. You never even heard any of the individual heroes mention the JLA in their own books. Hell, in one Flash comic the world was being invaded by aliens, and he never summoned the JLA! It was at that point I started to realized how stupid DC was (back then), and I had already started reading some Marvel (thanks to my older brother). Marvel had this sneaky way of forcing you to read their other titles - they did crossovers, where the story would begin in one hero's book, and end anther title. The beauty of that is that you could read both halves of a story the same month. The down side was that I eventually found myself having to buy every single Marvel title - something you didn't have to do with DC.

And I LOVED it. It felt like a REAL world (well, except for all the flying people and eye-lasers, LOL). Everything that happened in Marvel had perturbations that affected everything else. That's what makes a setting 'come alive'. That's what Ed Greenwood knew; why he dropped all those delicious 'Red Slippers'* into the lore. And its precisely what 3e slowly pulled away from, and went with a very stagnant, 'factual', compartmentalized approach. Ed's living, breathing world became more like a photo-album. You got 'snapshots', rather than a story.

And, I fear, that's precisely what Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes is going to be like. Plus, its all from the world-view of a dude from Oerth (GH) - why the heck would he even know about Realms-specific lore, let alone discuss it? Its just not going to happen, IMHO.


*Red Slippers is a concept (and literally device) that has been used by many authors but never given a name, AFAIK, before Dennis McKiernan wrote his book Red Slippers: More tales of Mithgar. The concept is that you name-drop stuff all throughout your work, be it places, personages, or things, to make your world seem more real, more 'alive'. Lovecraft did it with aplomb. So much so other authors picked-up on his Red Slippers (The Necrominicon, etc) and used them in their works. McKiernan came up with the name because he used to reference "the peculiar case of the Red Slipper", an event mentioned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in his Sherlock Holmes novels, but was never a real story. It was never elaborated on - it was just an offhand mention to make the world seem 'bigger' than just the cases we read about. And people LOOK for "the peculiar case of the Red Slipper", because fans want to know more. It became real to them. But there was no such story. It was just an in-world reference. So, although Mr. McKiernan may not have brought much originality to the table in his body of works, he understood good writing, and gave us a name for something that's been around a very long time. His book with that in the title? That was him finally explaining some of HIS 'Red Slippers' (which, unfortunately, defeats the whole purpose, eh?) As Ed once told the TSR design team - "for every one of (my) plothooks you use up, create three new ones". He understood that Red Slippers need to be left lying around. That when a world looks too 'neat & tidy' it begins look artificial.

Because here at CK, that's almost all we do. We try to find what those Red Slippers belong to. This site probably wouldn't still be around if it wasn't for them. This is why I meet new lore like MToF with both glee and trepidation. I WANT to know all the details, but a small part of me wants to keep wanting... that's just human nature.



Even if both sections don't reference Fey'ri they could be in the back of the book in the monster section or simply be a Cambion variant.
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
15245 Posts

Posted - 13 Feb 2018 :  18:47:36  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, Mike Mearls did say the book was setup a lot like Xanather's Guide, and I haven't seen that, so someone else who has may be able to make a more educated guess than I. I just don't see Mordenkainen talking about FR-specific things, but if Xanather talked about non-FR things (and more specifically, stuff explicitly from another setting), than I would have to assume the 'narrator' of the book doesn't really matter at all.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 13 Feb 2018 :  22:59:53  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Well, Mike Mearls did say the book was setup a lot like Xanather's Guide, and I haven't seen that, so someone else who has may be able to make a more educated guess than I. I just don't see Mordenkainen talking about FR-specific things, but if Xanather talked about non-FR things (and more specifically, stuff explicitly from another setting), than I would have to assume the 'narrator' of the book doesn't really matter at all.



He said it's set up like Volo's Guide, not Xanathar's Guide, big difference.

Basically first part will be Lore focused like it was for Volo's, although it was be lore focused on various races and their conflicts instead of Monster societies (Blood War Devils vs. Demons, Drow vs. None Drow Elves, Duergur vs Surface Dwarves, Githyanki vs. Githzerai vs. Mindflayers, Halflings and Gnomes just chilling out).

Then the middle will be player material (in Volo's it was Aasimar [Protector/Scourge/Fallen], Firbolgs, Yuan Ti Purebloods, Goliaths, Hobgoblins, Tabaxi, Hobgoblins, Kenku, Goblins, Bugbears, Tritons, Kobolds) and in MTOFs it will be With & Gith subraces (Githyanki & Githzerai), (Elven subraces like Shadar Kai, Eldarin, Sea Elves, maybe others), Tiefling subraces based on the Archdevils of Hell, possibly a reprint of Duergar and maybe some new Half Elf variants based on Shadar Kai and Eldarin (this is hypothetical), maybe Deep Gnomes and Whisper Halflings as well. There could races and player mechanics they haven't revealed yet.

Last section would be monsters, just like VGTM did (new demons, new devils, new Yugoloths, new monsters from the Shadowfell, Elf based monsters, Gnomish Clockwork Constructs, possibly Hoardlings, Cambion variants, Eidilons, ect..., half of the monsters will be CR 10 or higher).
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sfdragon
Great Reader

2134 Posts

Posted - 13 Feb 2018 :  23:02:40  Show Profile Send sfdragon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
it seemed the xanather was generic dnd and not much FR related stuff to me other than the title.

that may be just my opinion.
so it became look at, judged it not worth it. due to time constraints I looked at it again and my opinion did not change.

Mordenkainen's book will be the same treatment.

why is being a wizard like being a drow? both are likely to find a dagger in the back from a rival or one looking to further his own goals, fame and power


My FR fan fiction
Magister's GAmbit
http://steelfiredragon.deviantart.com/gallery/33539234
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
15245 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  01:37:10  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

He said it's set up like Volo's Guide, not Xanathar's Guide, big difference.
I was unaware there even was a Volo's guide. I need to catch-up.

Good information - thank you for sharing.

How was the Volo's guide, BTW? Now that I know Firbolgs were in it, I may have to buy that book.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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TomCosta
Forgotten Realms Designer

USA
506 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  02:10:11  Show Profile Send TomCosta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent. Volo's in particular is the highest rated 5E book (and 6th highest rated RPG book) on ENWorld, http://www.enworld.org/forum/productforums.php?do=criticalhits&sort=rating. The Monster lore in the front section really raises the bar, especially for monsters that hadn't seen that kind of attention in D&D before (looking at you goblinoids) or how they tweaked some things for the way better (looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).
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sfdragon
Great Reader

2134 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  02:22:12  Show Profile Send sfdragon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I disagree with you about Xanathar's guide to stuff

Volo's guide was highly enjoyable

and if mordenkainen's tome is like Volo's...

why is being a wizard like being a drow? both are likely to find a dagger in the back from a rival or one looking to further his own goals, fame and power


My FR fan fiction
Magister's GAmbit
http://steelfiredragon.deviantart.com/gallery/33539234
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30811 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  03:01:53  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TomCosta

Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent. Volo's in particular is the highest rated 5E book (and 6th highest rated RPG book) on ENWorld, http://www.enworld.org/forum/productforums.php?do=criticalhits&sort=rating. The Monster lore in the front section really raises the bar, especially for monsters that hadn't seen that kind of attention in D&D before (looking at you goblinoids) or how they tweaked some things for the way better (looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).



Honestly, that monster lore is a huge mark against the book, for me. When I was reading that Volo book, some of the monster lore made me regret the money I spent on the book.

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Kentinal
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4327 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  03:13:53  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TomCosta

Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent.
quote:
(looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).



A good reason to not like the book in my opinion. Dream you fellows. *shudders*

Of course others might like the idea.

"Small beings can have small wisdom," the dragon said. "And small wise beings are better than small fools. Listen: Wisdom is caring for afterwards."
"Caring for afterwards ...? Ker repeated this without understanding.
"After action, afterwards," the dragon said. "Choose the afterwards first, then the action. Fools choose action first."
"Judgement" copyright 2003 by Elizabeth Moon
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LordofBones
Senior Scribe

558 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  03:35:36  Show Profile Send LordofBones a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I imagine that the lore is from the generic player's perspective. It's the sort of thing the party wizard tells to his gullible fighter buddy for a laugh, only for that gullible fighter buddy to teach that in a monster-hunting course in the local fighter's guild.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30811 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  05:34:39  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Kentinal

quote:
Originally posted by TomCosta

Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent.
quote:
(looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).



A good reason to not like the book in my opinion. Dream you fellows. *shudders*

Of course others might like the idea.



It also had gnolls spontaneously forming from hyenas.

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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  14:25:50  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sfdragon

it seemed the xanather was generic dnd and not much FR related stuff to me other than the title.

that may be just my opinion.
so it became look at, judged it not worth it. due to time constraints I looked at it again and my opinion did not change.

Mordenkainen's book will be the same treatment.



Instead of pages of useless filler at the end it should have had how to use the subclasses and racial feats in various settings like the SCAG did.

Still as knowledgeable as I am about FR there is enough fluff in the subclasses to know how most of them fit into the realms.

Divine Souls would be very common in the old empires region from those descended from the blood lines of gods and their celestial/fiendish servants.

Samauri would be common in Kara Tur, especially Wa and that other Japan, as well as areas of high Shu populations.

Shadow Magic Sorcerers would be common in Netherese and Shadar Kai cities as well anywhere else that was exiled into the Shadowfell for a time.


Hexblades would be descendants of the Swordmage shadow magic of Netheril.

Celestial Pact Warlocks would be common among that Aasimar city in the Gates of the Moon.

Storm Magic Sorcerers common in the lands of the Sea of Fallen Stars (Great Rain) and Calimport (Descendants of Djinn).

Arcane Archers, common in the Yuirwood and various Elven lands.

Cavaliers common in Tethyr.

Mastermind could be found on Thieves Guilds, Inquistives in City Watches, Swashbucklers on ships, and Scouts serving in various military outposts in the wilderness.

Oath of Conquest, common among the faiths of Bane, Lovitar, Tempus, Helm, Asmodeaus.

Oath of Remdemption common among the faiths of Ilmater, Nobanion, Sharess, Sune, Llirra, Eldath.

Monks of the Sun Soul common among most goodly faiths.

Drunken Masters, Sharess, Sune, Llirra, and parts of Kara Tur.

Kenasi Kara Tur, maybe among the faithful of Tempus as well.

College of Glamour common among Elves, College of Whispers a Drow college, maybe Shadar Kai as well, College of Blades, connected to circuses travelling the realms.

Circle of Dreams and Circle of the Shepherd common on both the Moonshaes and Yuirwood and Feywild.

Warmages common among the War Wizards of Cormyr, some among mercanary groups, and some trained in Mulhorand.

Storm Heralds more likely found among tribes in extreme environments like Icewind Dale or the Calimshan Desert.


Zealots common in the armies if Tempus, Anhur, Garagos, Mordin, Thard Harr, and a few serving Sharess/Bast, Bane, Loviatar, Asmodeus.

Ancestoral Guardians common among any tribe, maybe even a few in noble houses deeply tied to their ancestors.


Clerics of the Forge common among dwarves and worshippers of Gond and that Mulan God of Earth I forget his name.

Clerics of the Grave Common among worshippers of Kelmvour and Jergal and naybe Mrykul.

Horizon Walker common in the Yuirwood, Evermeet, the remains of Myth Drannar/Shade, Calimport, and the part of the Feywild with the portal to the Far Realms.

Gloomstalker common in underdark cities and surface cities/towns frequently raided by Drow/Illithuds/Deurgar.

Monster Hunter more common in cities then other rangers and undead/demon infested areas like the Cold Lands.



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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1217 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  14:27:33  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by TomCosta

Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent. Volo's in particular is the highest rated 5E book (and 6th highest rated RPG book) on ENWorld, http://www.enworld.org/forum/productforums.php?do=criticalhits&sort=rating. The Monster lore in the front section really raises the bar, especially for monsters that hadn't seen that kind of attention in D&D before (looking at you goblinoids) or how they tweaked some things for the way better (looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).



Honestly, that monster lore is a huge mark against the book, for me. When I was reading that Volo book, some of the monster lore made me regret the money I spent on the book.



Yeah some of it didn't fit the FR lore and some did, it was like it didn't know if it wanted to be FR lore or generic D&D lore.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30811 Posts

Posted - 14 Feb 2018 :  16:00:04  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by TomCosta

Both Volo's Guide to Monsters and Xanathar's Guide to Everything were excellent. Volo's in particular is the highest rated 5E book (and 6th highest rated RPG book) on ENWorld, http://www.enworld.org/forum/productforums.php?do=criticalhits&sort=rating. The Monster lore in the front section really raises the bar, especially for monsters that hadn't seen that kind of attention in D&D before (looking at you goblinoids) or how they tweaked some things for the way better (looking at you beholders who now reproduce by dreaming of themselves).



Honestly, that monster lore is a huge mark against the book, for me. When I was reading that Volo book, some of the monster lore made me regret the money I spent on the book.



Yeah some of it didn't fit the FR lore and some did, it was like it didn't know if it wanted to be FR lore or generic D&D lore.



It wasn't the Core/FR issue for me... It was the fact that beholders literally popping out of dreams and hyenas spontaneously becoming gnolls was entirely out of left field.

Sure, there's a resemblance between gnolls and hyenas... But, IIRC, the book said that a hyena could eat from something a gnoll killed and then more gnolls would spawn from that hyena. Yeah, this is a fantasy setting, but we've had numerous write-ups of gnolls going back most of 40 years -- and so far as I know, this is something entirely new. It also makes gnolls different from every other humanoid race, since the rest rely on standard issue nookie for reproduction.

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