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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1177 Posts

Posted - 10 Jul 2017 :  18:36:01  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Okay so the Imaskari got transdimesional magic from studying Batrachi ruins or something, but it was the Lashay that helped them create the Imaskarna, so perhaps it was the Batrachi magic that allowed Imadkar to make contact with the LeShay in the first place.

So we have Calimshan based tradition, Imaskar, Netherese, and a Psionic Jamdaath tradition.

I'll add a Mulhorandi tradition, a subset of which is Thayan, and includes the unique ability to change arcane magic into divine, and divine magic into arcane. Origin, Mulhorandi Gods with some Imaskari influences. Untherite, including Chessenta.

Narfellian likely did come from fiends, with some Mulhorandi influences.

Rasheman tradition also likely had some Mulhorand influences, amoung others, although their magic originally resembled Eberron Artificers in some ways, although though now its practice is more regulated by the witches of Rasheman.

Other places I think are mostly influenced by elves, and wizards own research.

And of course Mystria, Azuth, and Savras inspire wizards. Velsharoon's church likely teaches Mulhorand Thayan variant of magic.

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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
14389 Posts

Posted - 10 Jul 2017 :  19:33:57  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Personally, I would spin 1e/2e 'Southern Magic' as Sorcery, and say Priests from the Old Empires had access to both spell lists. Or rather, they were using Imaskari magical traditions (would should have been based on Zakharan traditions, or 'Sorcery'), and they used some sort of Gestalt class, or if you're using 3e, just use one of the PrCs that combine arcane with Divine (and the arcane element should be Sorceror).

Or, if you want to dabble further into the Imaskari/Zakharan connection, maybe give it all an 'elemental' spin, like a Sorcerer/Elementalist (so in 4e terms, his 'power source' would be an Elemental Lord, or the Elemental Plane itself), very much like an OA Shugenja.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 10 Jul 2017 19:58:09
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Gyor
Master of Realmslore

1177 Posts

Posted - 10 Jul 2017 :  22:39:00  Show Profile Send Gyor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It was just a case of changing the energy signature or something of the magic, not the source, so anyone of an arcane or divine spell casting class could do it.

Still I see Mulhorand's current Priesthood being made up of 5e Favoured Souls with Cleric Ritual casting feat and Paladins, with maybe some Undying and Celestial Pact Warlocks and maybe some Bards.
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sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
6094 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  01:15:05  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

Okay so the Imaskari got transdimesional magic from studying Batrachi ruins or something, but it was the Lashay that helped them create the Imaskarna, so perhaps it was the Batrachi magic that allowed Imadkar to make contact with the LeShay in the first place.

So we have Calimshan based tradition, Imaskar, Netherese, and a Psionic Jamdaath tradition.

I'll add a Mulhorandi tradition, a subset of which is Thayan, and includes the unique ability to change arcane magic into divine, and divine magic into arcane. Origin, Mulhorandi Gods with some Imaskari influences. Untherite, including Chessenta.

Narfellian likely did come from fiends, with some Mulhorandi influences.

Rasheman tradition also likely had some Mulhorand influences, amoung others, although their magic originally resembled Eberron Artificers in some ways, although though now its practice is more regulated by the witches of Rasheman.

Other places I think are mostly influenced by elves, and wizards own research.

And of course Mystria, Azuth, and Savras inspire wizards. Velsharoon's church likely teaches Mulhorand Thayan variant of magic.





Narfell picked up a lot of their lore most likely from the Theurgist adepts who still remained after the orcgate wars.... who got a lot of THEIR lore from Imaskar.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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George Krashos
Master of Realmslore

Australia
4921 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  04:41:51  Show Profile Send George Krashos a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ilythiir.

-- George Krashos

"Because only we, contrary to the barbarians, never count the enemy in battle." -- Aeschylus
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KanzenAU
Senior Scribe

Australia
744 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  07:09:57  Show Profile Send KanzenAU a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Picked up this from Serpent Kingdoms, p59, on "Magic of the Sarrukh":
quote:
The Nether Scrolls were the results of sarrukh efforts to compile, deconstruct, and extrapolate the magic gleaned from the savages that inhabited most of Faerūn during the early days of the sarrukh empires. Penned by the Ba’etith long after the sarrukh empires had fallen, these scrolls remain an invaluable reference today.

So it sounds like the sarrukh learnt THEIR magic from humans... perhaps they extrapolated rules of magic from watching early human sorcerers?

Regional maps for Waterdeep, Triboar, Ardeep Forest, and Cormyr on DM's Guild, plus a campaign sized map for the North
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Aldrick
Senior Scribe

909 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  07:25:56  Show Profile Send Aldrick a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KanzenAU

Picked up this from Serpent Kingdoms, p59, on "Magic of the Sarrukh":
quote:
The Nether Scrolls were the results of sarrukh efforts to compile, deconstruct, and extrapolate the magic gleaned from the savages that inhabited most of Faerūn during the early days of the sarrukh empires. Penned by the Ba’etith long after the sarrukh empires had fallen, these scrolls remain an invaluable reference today.

So it sounds like the sarrukh learnt THEIR magic from humans... perhaps they extrapolated rules of magic from watching early human sorcerers?



Yes, definitely. However, I always read that entry as the sarrukh studying the magical traditions of all the various races they could locate, not just humans. From the perspective of the sarrukh, anyone who is not a sarrukh is a savage.
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sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
6094 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  13:13:06  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by KanzenAU

Picked up this from Serpent Kingdoms, p59, on "Magic of the Sarrukh":
quote:
The Nether Scrolls were the results of sarrukh efforts to compile, deconstruct, and extrapolate the magic gleaned from the savages that inhabited most of Faerūn during the early days of the sarrukh empires. Penned by the Ba’etith long after the sarrukh empires had fallen, these scrolls remain an invaluable reference today.

So it sounds like the sarrukh learnt THEIR magic from humans... perhaps they extrapolated rules of magic from watching early human sorcerers?



Also, what TYPE of magic was being learned. For instance, did they learn of say binding the spirit of an animal to a being. I'm betting that early humans were the source of many of the races that are "monstrous humanoids" or "animal-like humanoids" now. For instance, the Tabaxi cat folk I suspect millennia ago started out as humans who took on cat like features for defensive purposes. In fact, the type of magic didn't catch on, but I suspect that early humans were similar to the Totemists from Magic of Incarnum. They probably used fetishes to take on the traits of the beasts around them. Eventually, they learned to keep these traits.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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sleyvas
Great Reader

USA
6094 Posts

Posted - 11 Jul 2017 :  13:31:01  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor


Rasheman tradition also likely had some Mulhorand influences, amoung others, although their magic originally resembled Eberron Artificers in some ways, although though now its practice is more regulated by the witches of Rasheman.



I don't think this really fits. The Rashemi magic traditions came from Raumathar. Male Raumathari were more of a "evoker" or "elementalist" society, which also focused on magic combined with swordplay. Meanwhile, the females were focused more on defensive, healing, self-help, or intelligence gathering magics with a fey influence. The male Raumathari likely also picked up some technological knowledge from their Imaskari overlords who once ruled over some of the hordelands that the Raumathari had their capital placed in

(I will note here that the hordelands maps that shows the extents of various empires has proven to be off as more products have released, as it doesn't show Imaskar reaching into Chessenta, which it did with Metos... it also doesn't show Raumathar extending down into modern day Bezantur, but we know they had a city called Kensten there.... I actually think Snowblood's map of Imaskar is probably the most true, which reaches all the way up to where Winterkeep was.... ). Note, this is further backed up by this statement from the GHotR page 18 These permanent, two-way portals were constructed as circles of massive bronze spires, each etched with an
intricate runic design said to be batrachi in origin. These Bukhara Spires allowed whole legions to pass swiftly from one domain to the next, precipitating the rapid expansion of the Imaskar Empire across eastern Faerūn. By the end of the Early Dynastic period, the empire’s borders reached from the Great Ice Sea to the Golden Water, and from the Alamber Sea to the Katakoro Plateau in Kara-Tur.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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