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Aldrick
Senior Scribe

909 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2013 :  02:59:23  Show Profile Send Aldrick a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I should add that the high cost is a good thing. It keeps these types of things from being extremely common. If they were insanely cheap, then Thay could easily become the dominant naval power in the Sea of Fallen Stars. ...and by "dominant naval power" - I mean completely wreck absolutely everyone else - they would have no hope.

They would just be able to move their troops, wizards, and ships so fast, and no one would be able to outrun them. They'd have the ability to pretty much shut down the trade of any city or nation in the Sea of Fallen Stars.

I mean, it's difficult to comprehend just how advantageous a ship like this is - it can move so fast, can move non-stop, and doesn't need the wind. It's also so large that it can carry a bunch of troops with them, so that they quickly overwhelm pretty much all smaller vessels.

Pretty much the only ships with a chance against them would be an equivalently manned ship in the Blue Dragons (Cormyr's Navy). They'd have War Wizards and Blue Dragons aboard that would be a match for what the Red Wizards would send over when they boarded... but the Red Wizard's ships could easily avoid those if they felt threatened. They'd still have speed and mobility on their side.

However, if you're a merchant vessel? Congratulations. You're screwed.

Because of the taboo's about animating the dead, this tactic is really only available to either amoral or immoral groups.
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BadCatMan
Learned Scribe

Australia
328 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2013 :  04:16:01  Show Profile Send BadCatMan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If you're looking for an item to control skeleton rowers, there's the command amulet of the Necreme boat in Cormyr: The Tearing of the Weave. It's 9000 gp, with no stated limit on time or number of rowers (four orc skeletons on the Necreme). There's no lore attached to it though.

In my campaign, I described it as an onyx skull-and-crossbones (half-bones, half-oars), and likely came from a nautical necromancer out of Thay or the Tower Terrible in Soorenar.

(In other local pirate tales, I've had drow pirates emerge from a whirlpool in the Akanamere, singing a rather twisted version of "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" to their oar-slaves. "Life is but a scream!" :D )


Now, we know who is on "good terms with several pirate bands" in the area: Helyos and the Renegades (Gold & Glory).

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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
15675 Posts

Posted - 04 Jul 2013 :  18:43:03  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Aldrick

Actually, I disagree with you guys. I think "the widely feared pirate fleet of Alkoth" needs to be in a more advantageous location. If I had to designate a location, I'd place it on one of the Thousand Sword islets. Those are the islands surrounding the Altumbel archipelago.

quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

It is clear that there are pirates on the Thousand Swords, but that's very far away from Mourktar. It's possible that Alkoth is indeed there, but that leaves the question of where the bases in the eastern sea are located.

Why can you have both? The pirates 'homeland' are the Thousand Swords, but Alkoth (or whatever those caves might be called, because 'Alkoth' might just be a Pirate Lord's name) is their 'bolt hole' when they are in the southern waters. Pirates were notorious for having several different 'hideouts'.

I like the comparison to SoF&I's Iron Islands. If I ever have a group go there, I'll have to use that for inspiration; good call.

EDIT:
I just thought of a nick-name for pirates originating out of those islands (wherever they might be operating) - 'Tumblers' (because they are part of Altumbel). It sounds like someone who likes to fight and likes to wench.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 04 Jul 2013 18:49:01
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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1544 Posts

Posted - 15 Jul 2013 :  18:57:08  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Why can you have both? The pirates 'homeland' are the Thousand Swords, but Alkoth (or whatever those caves might be called, because 'Alkoth' might just be a Pirate Lord's name) is their 'bolt hole' when they are in the southern waters. Pirates were notorious for having several different 'hideouts'.

Indeed. This is my take on it. Obviously, a lot of the pirates that have been referenced in Old Empire lore will have come from the Thousand Swords, but just as obviously, those pirates will have bases within a single day's sail from the areas they operate in near Mourktar, Messemprar and elsewhere.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

I like the comparison to SoF&I's Iron Islands. If I ever have a group go there, I'll have to use that for inspiration; good call.

Of course, instead of quasi-Norse, Viking-esque trappings, what lore has been published about the Thousand Swords and areas close to it suggest quasi-Greek names and languages, with a possibility to steal freely from Anatolian, Phrygian, Illyrian, Armenian and Albanian languages as well.

In the real world, of course, there existed subcultures within the society of the speakers of these languages where piracy was a way of life. So I wouldn't be averse to stealing ship designs (liburnians), political organisations and other things, either.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

EDIT:
I just thought of a nick-name for pirates originating out of those islands (wherever they might be operating) - 'Tumblers' (because they are part of Altumbel). It sounds like someone who likes to fight and likes to wench.


The initially proposed Secret Service codename for Bush 43 was 'Tumbler'. He rejected it* and sources speculate that behind the refusal were concerns about just such connotations of the term, i.e. a hard-drinking, hard-fighting, hard-wenching good-ole boy, which image the POTUS most certainly did not want to project (in his mature years, at any rate).

*And was then assigned the name 'Trailblazer'.

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Ilmarinnen
Seeker

Ukraine
29 Posts

Posted - 12 Sep 2013 :  17:09:53  Show Profile  Send Ilmarinnen an ICQ Message Send Ilmarinnen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I wish I knew about the Necreme boat when I started my campaign, then "Serpentir"* would have been different from the very beginning.


*Thayan galley aboard which take place events of campaign.


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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1544 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2018 :  02:44:29  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Does anyone know whether Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug is supposed to be more or less powerful, in terms of channeling divine magic, than Wyrm Princess Shudu-Ab, the High Priestess of Tiamat in Unthalass?

She's 18th level and they are noted to be rivals/foes before the invasion of the Mulhorandi into Unther.

Also, has any novel, sourcebook or even post from an official author on a Candlekeep scroll mentioned anything about Kabarrath's appearance, quirks, tastes, history, etc.?

Basically, do I make it up from whole cloth, or should I check something first? I've read about him in Faith and Avatars and the single sentence in Tiamat's write-up in Powers and Pantheons. Is he mentioned anywhere else?

In the absence of any other information, I think I shall imagine him played by either Alan Rickman or Vincent Price. Ooh, or F. Murray Abraham. Rudolf Klein-Rogge?

Could go slightly against type. Robert Mitchum? Or Eric Godon.

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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
31317 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2018 :  03:24:02  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't see anything in my files about Kabarrath. While I'm hardly the exhaustive force, not having anything on him in my files is enough to convince me that any lore about him is either scant or obscure.

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BadCatMan
Learned Scribe

Australia
328 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2018 :  10:43:06  Show Profile Send BadCatMan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

Does anyone know whether Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug is supposed to be more or less powerful, in terms of channeling divine magic, than Wyrm Princess Shudu-Ab, the High Priestess of Tiamat in Unthalass?

She's 18th level and they are noted to be rivals/foes before the invasion of the Mulhorandi into Unther.

Also, has any novel, sourcebook or even post from an official author on a Candlekeep scroll mentioned anything about Kabarrath's appearance, quirks, tastes, history, etc.?

Basically, do I make it up from whole cloth, or should I check something first? I've read about him in Faith and Avatars and the single sentence in Tiamat's write-up in Powers and Pantheons. Is he mentioned anywhere else?


He's also mentioned in Dragons of Faerūn, page 72. It doesn't say anything about him personally, just updates the situation to under Alasklerbanbastos, demoting Telthaug to "Regent of Mourktar".

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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1544 Posts

Posted - 31 Jul 2018 :  20:05:14  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I know Kabarrath Telthaug commands 1,000 lesser priests of Bane and 700 priests of rank at the Black Lord's Cloak. I seem to recall a mention somewhere of a force of 5,000 templars in service of the temple. Is that number stated anywhere or is it an extrapolition from the number of priests?

I don't find it implausible that there would be 2-3 men-at-arms for every Banite priest at the temple, as professional warriors seem more common in the Realms than priests or other spellcasters, I'm just checking if the number is from some source I've overlooked, like 3e Lords of Darkness, Power of Faerun or Dragons of Faerun, all of which I'm termporily away from.

Regardless of what the exact number of the fighting force of the temple is, it seems pretty clear that Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug must have some generals and field commanders in his service.

I know that in 1357 DR, none of the competitors in King Theris' Inheritance Games were representatives of Bane's temple in Mourktar. Of course, it's possible that King Theris or some of his councilors forbade any worshipper of Bane from competing, whether because of a dislike of the faith or perhaps simply to avoid causing religious dissent in the city, where the faith of Assuran of the Three Thunders was at that time hugely important. Or perhaps the priests of Bane assisted the priests of Assuran as judges and referees, with the consequence that champions of neither faith were allowed to participate directly.

If there was no such ban in place, that would suggest that none of the templars or other champions of the Black Lord's Cloak in 1357 DR were world-class athletes. That's not such a shock, of course, as being a professional warrior is not necessarily the best preparation for athletic competition. Trained full-time warriors are physically fit, strong and in excellent condition, but unless they are gladiators, showmen or passionate enthusiasts of sports, they spend their training time sparring in full armour, marching, moving in formation and otherwise preparing for warfare, not obsessively perfecting a sporting move, trying to shave half a breath from their running times or mastering a throwing style no one uses in combat.

I think that in my campaign, Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath believes it is time to send his favourite field commander, his strong right hand, to Unther. He still hasn't committed his templars to battle against the Mulhorandi, but mercenaries in the service of the Black Lord's Cloak have been operating in Unther for a long time and are now actively fighting the Mulhorandi as allies of Free Unther (eventually treacherous allies, but still..). As the Regent of Mourktar is considering unleashing the full might of his templars, he needs to send his best men to the scene to make the decision.

So, what kind of man would be the Darth Vader to Kabarrath Telthaug's Palpatine?

I'm open to the idea that he'll send a delegation of at least two, a professional battlemaster/general and an inquisitor/spymaster. One would be a warrior type, the other either a priest, a rogue or a wizard (very likely a priest with some minor roguish skills). I'm considering how old they ought to be and what their backgrounds should be...

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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1544 Posts

Posted - 01 Aug 2018 :  09:56:37  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
On another Threskel subject, do we know who Pryollus, of the 'Fields of Pryollus' south of Mount Thulbane, was?

Assuming that Threskeli culture is sufficiently similar to Chessentan culture for them to have a concept of War Heroes, I'd assume that he was an ancient War Hero, either someone who fought alongside Tchazzar against Unther or someone from a much earlier period in history.

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Demzer
Senior Scribe

620 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2018 :  09:05:58  Show Profile Send Demzer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
There is not much in canon to base the following on but connecting the sparse bits and pieces related to Mourktar I offer these speculations.

Bane's clergy in Mourktar around 1E and 2E amounts to almost 1/5 of the total population of the city, and that's just the clergy. King Theris and his most trusted advisors were staunch followes of Assuran, supported by a "strong" military, yet as soon as Theris disappeared, the faith in Assuran quickly declined and left space for the Banites.
The overall history of Threskel and the fact that King Theris was the last heir of the line of war leaders that won Mourktar its independence lead me to believe that the region had always strongly autarchic and independentists vibes, with indipendence from both Unther and Chessenta (at least the Chessenta united under Tchazzar) always fought for and a perpetual state of war readiness and a "siege syndrome" that fueled the veneration for war leaders and tyrants. This was obviously fertile soil for Banite worship, but the ancient ties of the royal family with the worship of Assuran (and the old dogma of supporting the Tyrant and not being the Tyrant of the Banites of old) kept the Banites in check and as a very strong but ancillary faith to the central power of Assuran, directly bound with the royal line of war leaders.

After the ToT, after the death of King Theris (last of the line of war leaders) and after all the upheaval inside the church of Bane (or "Bane"), the situation changed and Telthaug resolutely established the already predominant faith of Bane as the de-facto government of Mourktar.

Now, what has all this to do with the Dread Imperceptor's field commander?
As you noted, the Banites had no champion in the Games for the succession for King Theris, I think this was not because they were actively shut out by the King and his advisors (seems too antagonistic of an act to do to the largest faith in your city, unless you are fishing for civil war) and we know there were other champions directly related to other faiths (an Osirian paladin and a champion of Gilgeam among the favourites, the latter surely more despised by independent Mourktar than any champion born in Threskel could ever be, even if of the "wrong" faith).
The explanation I found dives into a bit of a paradox and is based on the rules of the tournament as reported in Old Empires (page 67): It is open to both human and half-elven men and women; women are forbidden to compete in boxing and wrestling and thus labor under a handicap.
These rules imply that women have no chance of winning (since without a score in 2 of the competition is practically impossible for them to get one of the two top scores) and that everyone that's not a human or an half-elf is banned. Now the paradox I was talking about, despite the evil and brutality of Bane's dogma I cant remember if it actually states anywhere that the Tyrant has to be human, thus the Banite church could be more egalitarian than most since it doesn't matter what race or ancestry you had, but if you were the strongest then you were the rightful Tyrant.
This long and convoluted way is to say that in my view the Church of Bane could not take part in the Games because their champion was not eligible and this opens open quite a few possibilities, going from basic to wacky:
- a female human or half-elf every bit as competent as the war heroes of the region (but this may sound like a rip-off of Scyllua Darkhope);
- an elf, half-orc or dwarven champion of dubious ancestry, taken in as an orphan by the Banites and developed into an utterly loyal weapon of conquest;
- a duergar or troll (or an half-) or half-drow from the Riders to the Sky Mountains personally raised by the Dread Imperceptor or bought as a slave after his/her raiding party was destroyed by the Banites patrols and later indoctrinated.

As for Pryollus, since we don't know the name of the leader that won the independence from Unther in 823 I think it's a reasonable assumption that the only geographical feature in the area named after someone should be named after the first of the line of war leaders from which King Theris descended.

Edited by - Demzer on 03 Aug 2018 10:01:59
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dazzlerdal
Great Reader

United Kingdom
4019 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2018 :  10:32:50  Show Profile Send dazzlerdal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I like your suppositions about threskel (especially pryollus, I will be using that idea.

I would be more tempted to make the banities absence from the tournament be about subterfuge and politics.

Perhaps have the banites protest against the bias against women and the prohibition of demi humans, not because they care but because they want to appear to represent the people and fairness.

Then a series of accidents befall the banites athletes, poisonings, injuries, sudden withdrawal, disappearances, etc.

The end result is that the games go ahead, it becomes a farce of cheating and politics. By the end the champion is discounted and the banites look like the good guys.

When king theris dies the people select kabarrath to rule.

What no one realises is the banites poisoned and injured and blackmailed it's own athletes to remove them from the games, it then aided the cheating of others (supplying performance enhancing magic to athletes through black market agents they paid, and provided assassin contacts to those wishing to eliminate rivals).

So the baddies make themselves look like goodies and get chosen by popular outcry to rule the city when theris is dead. After all the banites are not outwardly evil, they just want a strictly lawful and regimented society that their leaders can exploit to their own advantage.

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Demzer
Senior Scribe

620 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2018 :  14:00:26  Show Profile Send Demzer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't know if it has been mentioned here yet, but I mostly follow Eric L. Boyd "apocryphal" Old Empires timeline extension (available somewhere in these forums).

In it there is a lot of backstabbing and cheating in the Games that ends up with the Osirian paladin winning and in the space of some years being assassinated by the Banites which then proceed to take control of the ruling council of the city that substitutes the monarchy.
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dazzlerdal
Great Reader

United Kingdom
4019 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2018 :  14:08:34  Show Profile Send dazzlerdal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I likewise follow that timeline. Sounds like a perfect double fake; eliminate all your own participants to make yourself look like the victim and gain popular support, then secretly manipulate events so a loser (red wizards) hires an assassin to take out the winner thus nullifying the result of the games and invalidating that method of succession.

Then when the king dies everyone thinks the banites should be in charge.

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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1544 Posts

Posted - 06 Aug 2018 :  18:58:33  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dazzlerdal

I likewise follow that timeline. Sounds like a perfect double fake; eliminate all your own participants to make yourself look like the victim and gain popular support, then secretly manipulate events so a loser (red wizards) hires an assassin to take out the winner thus nullifying the result of the games and invalidating that method of succession.

Then when the king dies everyone thinks the banites should be in charge.


While I have no objections to the events of the timeline, I still believe that if the option of winning the games outright had been available to the master of the Black Lord's Cloak, it would have been a lot less trouble, risk and expense. Not to mention that entering a competitor would not have prevented them from putting an alternate plan into effect if he didn't look like their man was going to win.

It is, of course, possible that both the faiths of Assuran of the Three-Thunders and Bane, the Black Lord, sent competitors that were not notable enough to be named among the four major contenders in Old Empires. There were, after all, a total of 64 competitors.

But I think it would be more credible that King Theris' vision from Assuran specifically called for the priests of the civil faiths of Mourktar, Assuran and Bane, to continue in their roles as the strong pillars of the Mourktar throne and act as disinterested judges of the contest.

Either Assuran or King Theris would have realised the damage it would do to Mourktar if the churches of Assuran and Bane started to quarrel for ultimate power in Mourktar. King Theris seems to have had the loyalty of the army and enough pull in politics to get the guilds to agree to a plan for the succession that they considered, frankly, insane. Yet King Theris didn't try to leave his throne to a devouted servant of Assuran, which suggests, to me, that he realised that after his passing, the Black Lord's Cloak wouldn't accept the continued supremacy of the church of Assuran, not without the legitimacy of descent from the royal family. The tournament seems like it might have been an attempt to prevent civil strife by raising up a ruler who had ties to neither church.

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sleyvas
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USA
7262 Posts

Posted - 07 Aug 2018 :  00:59:15  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Demzer

There is not much in canon to base the following on but connecting the sparse bits and pieces related to Mourktar I offer these speculations.

Bane's clergy in Mourktar around 1E and 2E amounts to almost 1/5 of the total population of the city, and that's just the clergy. King Theris and his most trusted advisors were staunch followes of Assuran, supported by a "strong" military, yet as soon as Theris disappeared, the faith in Assuran quickly declined and left space for the Banites.
The overall history of Threskel and the fact that King Theris was the last heir of the line of war leaders that won Mourktar its independence lead me to believe that the region had always strongly autarchic and independentists vibes, with indipendence from both Unther and Chessenta (at least the Chessenta united under Tchazzar) always fought for and a perpetual state of war readiness and a "siege syndrome" that fueled the veneration for war leaders and tyrants. This was obviously fertile soil for Banite worship, but the ancient ties of the royal family with the worship of Assuran (and the old dogma of supporting the Tyrant and not being the Tyrant of the Banites of old) kept the Banites in check and as a very strong but ancillary faith to the central power of Assuran, directly bound with the royal line of war leaders.

After the ToT, after the death of King Theris (last of the line of war leaders) and after all the upheaval inside the church of Bane (or "Bane"), the situation changed and Telthaug resolutely established the already predominant faith of Bane as the de-facto government of Mourktar.

Now, what has all this to do with the Dread Imperceptor's field commander?
As you noted, the Banites had no champion in the Games for the succession for King Theris, I think this was not because they were actively shut out by the King and his advisors (seems too antagonistic of an act to do to the largest faith in your city, unless you are fishing for civil war) and we know there were other champions directly related to other faiths (an Osirian paladin and a champion of Gilgeam among the favourites, the latter surely more despised by independent Mourktar than any champion born in Threskel could ever be, even if of the "wrong" faith).
The explanation I found dives into a bit of a paradox and is based on the rules of the tournament as reported in Old Empires (page 67): It is open to both human and half-elven men and women; women are forbidden to compete in boxing and wrestling and thus labor under a handicap.
These rules imply that women have no chance of winning (since without a score in 2 of the competition is practically impossible for them to get one of the two top scores) and that everyone that's not a human or an half-elf is banned. Now the paradox I was talking about, despite the evil and brutality of Bane's dogma I cant remember if it actually states anywhere that the Tyrant has to be human, thus the Banite church could be more egalitarian than most since it doesn't matter what race or ancestry you had, but if you were the strongest then you were the rightful Tyrant.
This long and convoluted way is to say that in my view the Church of Bane could not take part in the Games because their champion was not eligible and this opens open quite a few possibilities, going from basic to wacky:
- a female human or half-elf every bit as competent as the war heroes of the region (but this may sound like a rip-off of Scyllua Darkhope);
- an elf, half-orc or dwarven champion of dubious ancestry, taken in as an orphan by the Banites and developed into an utterly loyal weapon of conquest;
- a duergar or troll (or an half-) or half-drow from the Riders to the Sky Mountains personally raised by the Dread Imperceptor or bought as a slave after his/her raiding party was destroyed by the Banites patrols and later indoctrinated.




just to note, Kabbarrath's name was apparently updated to two B's in dragons of Faerun.

Hmmmm, that's an interesting concept... so possibly Imperceptor Kabbarrath Telthaugh himself couldn't compete because he wasn't a human or a half-elf... and maybe that's why the clause was added. Maybe they knew he wouldn't put forth another champion, because he wanted to be the ruler himself. I just checked both Faiths and Avatars and Dragons of Faerun. Neither of them actually specify his race (or even his class or level). Just to throw some options out there...

Another godson of Bane birthed on a devil, such that he's a tiefling?

Another Banelich, thus why this temple was still able to worship "Bane" despite his death (though we do know that the temple also changed its colors to black and green)?

Some other kind of undead, such as a vampire, a mummy, etc... (noting here that the Black Lord's Cloak is a strange blood drinking cloak once worn by Bane, so vampire COULD fit if he was turned by the power of the cloak)

From F&A regarding the Temple of the Black Lord's Cloak
The temple is named for its only relic, an animated black cloak once worn by Bane himself that became a sentient monster that envelops people from time to time and sucks them dry of all blood.



Maybe he's a half-dragon? In fact, if Assuran of the Three Thunders is an ascended blue dragon as many of us have asserted, and if Assuran ascended with the help of Bane..... maybe the price was his firstborn child.... hmmm, and to make things REALLY weird.... maybe he was birthed upon Ishtar, and this was what made Ramman chase Assuran out of Unther. Or if you don't want to get all freaky-deaky just a regular half-dragon, but birthed from one of the blue dragons serving Alasklerbanbastos... or even possibly Alasklerbanbastos himself (how long can half-dragons live anyway? This would put Kabbarrath Telthaug at probably more than 350 back in 1357 since Alasklerbanbastos converted in 1018 DR).


Just to note as well, Alasklerbanbastos apparently converted to a dracolich at the same time that a rage of dragons occurred, since this is when Gargauth was released down in Peleveran. Its also the same time that Tchazzar the red dragon ascended by "disappearing".

Maybe some other non human or non half-elf.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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sleyvas
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Posted - 07 Aug 2018 :  03:43:48  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
So, after writing up the above... I decided, just for fun let's get REALLY Freaky with it..... and it actually turns interesting.

Assuran is an ascended blue dragon. Alasklerbanbastos is his child (grandchild maybe?).

Gilgeam did in fact have a child. It was with a succubus created from the soul of a former priestess of Inanna who had served Gilgeam as a lover when she was alive. This daughter was Gilgeam's secret shame, but he could not bring himself to kill her. He kept this daughter secret.

When Tchazzar was rallying northwestern Unther, he captured Gilgeam's daughter. Tchazzar used Gilgeam's daughter to force Gilgeam to not join in the fight against Chessenta.


Determined to force Gilgeam to destroy his enemy, Alasklerbanbastos steals Gilgeam's daughter from Tchazzar. However, Alasklerbanbastos was unprepared for the magically seductive nature of a god-born child from a succubus of a former priestess of Inanna. Alasklerbanbastos is wooed by Gilgeam's daughter, but as a dragon he also refuses to let her leave him, coveting her as if she were treasure. A child is born of their union. This part dragon, part succubus, part divine being would come to be called Kabbarrath Telthaugh, and he is born with his mother's natural ability to polymorph himself due to his diluted succubus blood.


1000 DR (source demihuman deities)
Priests of Abbathor, dwarven lord of Greed, follow a trail of golden coins that they believe were placed by Abbathor. They enter a trapped dragon's lair, which they traverse for some time before penetrating the lair.

1001 DR Year of the Awakening (source demihuman deities and Power & Pantheons)
The dwarven priests of Abbathor discover the ghost of a great red wyrm named Ragflaconshen, Spawn of Mahatnartorian. The dragon had died defending its lair from the avatar of Abbathor. The priests of the god of Greed are directed to spread word to the other clergy of his faithful throughout the cold lands that they are to bring their hoards to the dragon's lair in order to set the ghost to rest.

Somehow the Cult of the Dragon Archmage, Tuelhalva Drakewings, hears of this undead dragon, however the information he is given indicates that it is in the Cliffside City of Peleveria down in the Shaar. Tuelhalva Drakewings discovers the Dark Pit of Maleficence and hears "a reptilian voice" who promises him power if he will free him from the pit. Tuelhalva sees this as a means to break away from Algashon and his Banites who have started taking control of the Cult of the Dragon. Tuelhalva begins a 17 year long ritual which will eventually come to release Gargauth.

1018 DR (sources Cult of the Dragon, Demihuman Deities, and Powers and Pantheons)

Tuelhalva Drakewings calls for a secession from the Cult of the Dragon in Sembia, and numerous Cult mages, dracoliches, dracohybrids, and dragons come to Tuelhalva's side in Peleveran. Tuelhalva frees Gargauth (and his great blue wyrm mount Rathguul) from the Dark Pit of Maleficence in the Cliffside City of Peleveria in the kingdom of Peleveran in the Shaar (a city built into the Landrise). He is rewarded with an army of baatezu, which he uses to seize the throne of Peleveran. Many mages of the Cult of the Dragon

The King Killer Star draws near. Dragons throughout Faerun begin feeling the effects of the rage.

The priests of Abbathor bring enough of their hoards to the lair of the lair of the ghost dragon, Ragflaconshen, Spawn of Mahatnartorian, that the spirit of the dragon can finally rest. Abbathor directs them to build Aefarn, the House of Gold, his greatest temple in Faerun on the site.

Gargauth approaches members of the Cult of the Dragon in Urmlaspyr in the guise of an aged wizard and whispers that Tuelhalva Drakewings has killed "an ancient undead dragon king". This is "confirmed" when their divinations "reveal" that a powerful dragon spirit has been "destroyed". Enraged, Algashon and 20 other mages of the Cult summoned all their dragon, dracolich, and dragon hybrid allies together into huge a flight of dragons.

Seeking to escape the dragon rage, Tchazzar enters into a pact with some divine being (Bane? Gargauth? Tiamat?) to ascend as a demigod. He disappears from Chessenta.

In a fit of dracorage, Alasklerbanbastos kills Gilgeam's daughter. Seeking to escape the dragon rage before it can affect him again, Alasklerbanbastos hears of the Cult of the Dragon descending on Peleveran. He contacts members of the Cult as he is given to understand that dracoliches are not affected by the dragon rage. A group of Banite priests of the Cult of the Dragon separate themselves from their mission in order to create a new dracolich. Enjoying the beliefs of the Cult of the Dragon that undead dragons would come to rule the world, especially given his part dragon status, Kabbarrath Telthaug leaves his home to travel with the cultists and learn their secrets.

Within a month of Tuelhalva's coronation, a Rage of Dragons descends on Peleveran, and when it had passes not a trace of that nation nor Tuelhalva remain.

Drakewings, his followers, and the handful of dragons and dracoliches they control were all destroyed, but the Sembian faction#146;s victory comes at a price. Beyond decimating the Sembians'#146; ranks of draconic might, Algashon, high priest of Bane, falls in the climactic confrontation with Drakewings. Algashon and Tuelhalva meet high above the smoking ruins of Peleveria, each atop a mighty dracolich. The name of Drakewings#146; mount is lost, but Algashon rode Shargrailar the Dark into the fray. Of the four, only the Sacred One, as Shargrailar demanded to be called, survived.


A whispering voice tells Kabbarrath Telthaug where he can find an artifact of Bane, the Dark Lord's Cloak, on the body of Algashon, former High Priest of Bane and head Cult of the dragon. Kabbarrath Telthaugh convinces several banite priests of the Cult of the Dragon to serve him. They proceed to establish the temple known as "The Black Lord's Cloak" in Mourktar.


Kabbarrath Telthaugh, with study of the ritual to make dracoliches and his studies of Bane, decides that he will seek to become the first draco-banelich, and thus he will become the first undead dragon to rule with a fist of the tyrant.


So, the half-dragon, half-fiend, with blood of a god, turns draco-banelich, using the artifact known as "The Black Lord's Cloak" as his phylactery. Similar to how liches must "rejuvenate" themselves with larvae, his phylactery must periodically drain blood from the living in order to maintain Kabbarrath's lich state.

Kabbarrath Telthaug becomes regent of Mourktar after the fallout from the death of King Theris.

Alasklerbanbastos reaches out to his son, Kabbarrath, to help him rule Threskel and fight off against Tchazzar.

Spellplague - Mourktar and much of Threskel transfers to Abeir. On Toril, a new city is built on the coastline of Threskel, and it is named Mourktar by those who survived.


While in Abeir, Kabbarath Telthaug, grandchild of Gilgeam, convinces the Mulan descendants that he is actually Gilgeam. The spirit of Bane that survives within him speaks to him of gaining greater divinity by absorbing the power of a primordial being. "Gilgeam"/Kabbarrath begins leading an army of Mulans to hunt down and kill the primordial lord Karshimis, "the despot of Shyr". The sundering occurs befor he can kill Karshimis, bringing Kabbarrath/"Gilgeam" back to Toril.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas

Edited by - sleyvas on 07 Aug 2018 04:11:05
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Icelander
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Posted - 07 Aug 2018 :  23:39:24  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug's age

How old are scribes imagining Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug?

He was the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak before the Time of Troubles, which means that in 1357-1358 DR, Imperceptor Kabarrath had amassed the personal power and learning of a 12th+ level priest, as well as the political influence, support and network of favours within the church of Bane to become the master of the largest, most powerful temple to the Black Lord in Faerun.

Of course, Imperceptor Kabarrath might have been the master of the Black Lord's Cloak for decades before claiming the title of Dread Imperceptor.

At minimum, I'd expect Kabarrath to be in his forties when he became the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak. This means that at the absolute youngest, he could be 57-60 years old in 1373 DR. To me, that feels a little too young, but it's within the realm of possibility.

To take a more likely guess, if Kabarrath was in his mid-fifties when he became the master of the temple and he had held that position for a decade or two before the Time of Troubles, he'd be more than eighty in 1373 DR. I like that age, I think.

Any thoughts?

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Edited by - Icelander on 07 Aug 2018 23:40:02
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sleyvas
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  01:05:31  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug's age

How old are scribes imagining Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug?

He was the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak before the Time of Troubles, which means that in 1357-1358 DR, Imperceptor Kabarrath had amassed the personal power and learning of a 12th+ level priest, as well as the political influence, support and network of favours within the church of Bane to become the master of the largest, most powerful temple to the Black Lord in Faerun.

Of course, Imperceptor Kabarrath might have been the master of the Black Lord's Cloak for decades before claiming the title of Dread Imperceptor.

At minimum, I'd expect Kabarrath to be in his forties when he became the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak. This means that at the absolute youngest, he could be 57-60 years old in 1373 DR. To me, that feels a little too young, but it's within the realm of possibility.

To take a more likely guess, if Kabarrath was in his mid-fifties when he became the master of the temple and he had held that position for a decade or two before the Time of Troubles, he'd be more than eighty in 1373 DR. I like that age, I think.

Any thoughts?



Depends on what race he actually is. You are assuming human. He could be several hundred years old for all we know.

Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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Icelander
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  02:49:46  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sleyvas

Depends on what race he actually is. You are assuming human. He could be several hundred years old for all we know.


I'm assuming human because Faiths & Avatars p. 20 states, for non-human clergy, priests & followers, that if non-human clergy are allowed, it would be specifically mentioned in the individual deity write-ups. Bane contains no such mentions.

The text then further suggests that the player and GM communicate clearly about their needs and desires, how to make both persons happy without introducing silly characters, plot elements or SpecialSnowflakeRainbowUnicorns of Fashionable Faith into the Realms. Which, if everyone affected is cool with, is just fine.

But it leads pretty firmly to the interpretation that a priest of a human deity is human, unless otherwise specified. And the more politically influential a priest is, the better the odds on him being ethnically, culturally and racially acceptable to the majority of the devout.

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LordofBones
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  05:08:19  Show Profile Send LordofBones a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug's age

How old are scribes imagining Dread Imperceptor Kabarrath Telthaug?

He was the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak before the Time of Troubles, which means that in 1357-1358 DR, Imperceptor Kabarrath had amassed the personal power and learning of a 12th+ level priest, as well as the political influence, support and network of favours within the church of Bane to become the master of the largest, most powerful temple to the Black Lord in Faerun.

Of course, Imperceptor Kabarrath might have been the master of the Black Lord's Cloak for decades before claiming the title of Dread Imperceptor.

At minimum, I'd expect Kabarrath to be in his forties when he became the high priest of the Black Lord's Cloak. This means that at the absolute youngest, he could be 57-60 years old in 1373 DR. To me, that feels a little too young, but it's within the realm of possibility.

To take a more likely guess, if Kabarrath was in his mid-fifties when he became the master of the temple and he had held that position for a decade or two before the Time of Troubles, he'd be more than eighty in 1373 DR. I like that age, I think.

Any thoughts?



It's not inconceivable that he could be younger, assuming he was prodigious enough to rise quickly through the ranks.

Admittedly, priestly Palpatine works too.
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sleyvas
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  12:17:07  Show Profile Send sleyvas a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

quote:
Originally posted by sleyvas

Depends on what race he actually is. You are assuming human. He could be several hundred years old for all we know.


I'm assuming human because Faiths & Avatars p. 20 states, for non-human clergy, priests & followers, that if non-human clergy are allowed, it would be specifically mentioned in the individual deity write-ups. Bane contains no such mentions.

The text then further suggests that the player and GM communicate clearly about their needs and desires, how to make both persons happy without introducing silly characters, plot elements or SpecialSnowflakeRainbowUnicorns of Fashionable Faith into the Realms. Which, if everyone affected is cool with, is just fine.

But it leads pretty firmly to the interpretation that a priest of a human deity is human, unless otherwise specified. And the more politically influential a priest is, the better the odds on him being ethnically, culturally and racially acceptable to the majority of the devout.



FRC1 Ruins of Adventure

The temple is currently under the sway of Mace, a half-orc who is also a 4th level cleric of Bane. He has a substantial following of orcs who consider him to be divinely guided and who obey him slavishly.




Alavairthae, may your skill prevail

Phillip aka Sleyvas
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Icelander
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  13:52:58  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sleyvas

FRC1 Ruins of Adventure

The temple is currently under the sway of Mace, a half-orc who is also a 4th level cleric of Bane. He has a substantial following of orcs who consider him to be divinely guided and who obey him slavishly.


I don't object to the occasional exotic priest of Bane edisting in the Realms, but I think it's pretty reasonable to assume that unless otherwise specified, priests of human deities are human. FRC1 specifies otherwise. Faiths and Avatars does not.

And I also believe that there is a world of difference between being a bandit orc chief with minor clerical abilities from Bane and rising to lead the largest temple of Bane in the Realms. Success in clerical politics correlates with success in temporal politics. Either way, make sure you select the right parents, ancestors, relatives and connections. That means being born to local aristocrats who can help your church career, not to monsters living outside civilised society.

For a real-world analogy, look at the Roman Catholic church. There are a fair number of priests who have belonged to ethnicities other than those forming the Italian aristocracy, but look at how many of those have made Pope. Disregarding the early history of the Church, as the reliability of evidence for the age, ethnicity and even gender of Popes that far into the past might fairly be called into question, for about the thousand years, the Pope has nearly always been a middle-aged or older Italian guy with lots of noble relatives, and even when he wasn't, he was still a highly educated and well-connected middle-aged or older white guy indistinguishable from an Italian to most of the planet's populace.

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Edited by - Icelander on 08 Aug 2018 13:54:30
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Demzer
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  14:15:25  Show Profile Send Demzer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

For a real-world analogy, look at the Roman Catholic church.



Assuming real world religions as analogies for the Realms is a recipe for disaster, in this case because the Pope gets elected (and there are countless ways in which this election can and has been manipulated) while we have no clue what's the process of selection for most of the churches of the Realms.
In the case of the Banite church, the titular head of the church (their "Pope") was directly indicated by Bane himself and we don't know what ways it took to ascend the various ranks.
An election of any kind seems completely out of the style of Banite practices so I would avoid any analogy with elective offices.

Edited by - Demzer on 08 Aug 2018 14:16:13
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Icelander
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Posted - 08 Aug 2018 :  14:27:45  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Demzer

quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

For a real-world analogy, look at the Roman Catholic church.



Assuming real world religions as analogies for the Realms is a recipe for disaster, in this case because the Pope gets elected (and there are countless ways in which this election can and has been manipulated) while we have no clue what's the process of selection for most of the churches of the Realms.
In the case of the Banite church, the titular head of the church (their "Pope") was directly indicated by Bane himself and we don't know what ways it took to ascend the various ranks.
An election of any kind seems completely out of the style of Banite practices so I would avoid any analogy with elective offices.


It's not like the 'election' was all that democratic. The new Pope was co-opted by an oligarchic inner circle of the church, usually with a lot of bribery, horse-trading and unofficial power-sharing agreements behind the scenes. I expect that to be the practical reality for many faiths in the Realms, regardless of what the process is called.

From what I could tell from the power struggles in Zhentil Keep and Mulmaster between 1300-1372 DR, the church politics of the Black Lord's Altar and the wider church of Bane were actually very analogous to High Medieval to Renaissance church politics.

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