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Hoondatha
Great Reader

USA
2394 Posts

Posted - 28 Jun 2010 :  13:17:35  Show Profile  Visit Hoondatha's Homepage Send Hoondatha a Private Message
Blast globes actually show up in Shadows of Doom, and yes, they're a lot like really fragile grenades. And, IIRC, Ed mentioned here at some point that the Zhent who's using them got his position in the Zhentarim because he was able to reverse-engineer them from Netherese examples. So that may be what Ed's talking about. On the other hand, there could be even scarier versions the Netherese created, but that haven't been seen in canon yet.

THO, thanks for sharing, and I look forward to hearing was Ed has to say. I'm beginning to think that it's a very good thing that Halruaa is so isolationistic...

Doggedly converting 3e back to what D&D should be...
Sigh... And now 4e as well.

Edited by - Hoondatha on 28 Jun 2010 13:19:22
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
648 Posts

Posted - 28 Jun 2010 :  18:46:27  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message
There's also a reference in The North and Volo's Guide to the North about the Many-Starred Cloak making blastglobes for the Neveren militia. Volo's goes a little further with the following footnote (partially quoted):
"Blastglobes are bronze-hued glass spheres that are hurled in battle. Treat them as grenade-like missiles. They burst on impact for 2d8 damage."

Edit: Is there anything Ed can tell us about Wizbane Square in Suzail?

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms

I am a sexy, shoeless god of war!

The Sellplague began, for all intents and purposes, in the dominions of the Corporation. Greed murdered Good Design, unraveling common sense in the cosmos and destroying her dominion. At the same time, Sales Fears and Warcraft Envy happened into alignment. This cataclysmic coincidence led to upheaval, shaking apart the primeval order, opening up holes in wallets, and reshaping everything...

Edited by - Kyrene on 28 Jun 2010 20:41:48
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Zandilar
Learned Scribe

Australia
313 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  01:20:45  Show Profile  Visit Zandilar's Homepage Send Zandilar a Private Message
Heya,

quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf
What is Mr. Greenwood's stance on the canonicity of the video games? According to the Forgotten Realms wiki, Baldur's Gate, the video game, is technically canon through its novelizations, which I would suspect to be true of any of the games which have been similarly adapted.


The Baldur's Gate novels weren't particularly good, and I'm sure I'm not the only one that passionately hates them for how badly they adapted the game series. The only things the books had in common with the games is that they shared titles, and some characters had the same names (despite being VERY different). Also, they had a very unlikable protagonist that I found very difficult to relate to.

About the only thing they DID do was give the Realms it's first (I believe) openly gay character in a novel. (And then promptly killed her off, yay... not. )

quote:

But what about the ones that haven't? Did Myrkul canonically create a spirit eater curse in Rashemen to sustain his existence outside the Crown of Horns, only to be obliterated by that same curse? Did Waterdeep actually come under siege by Mephistopheles himself?

I always obsess over canon in the games I run, so it's something I've always wondered.



I'm pretty sure games without novels are not canon, since games are not canon. This is because there's one BIG problem with adapting games to canon - you immediately alienate anyone who played the game by setting a not-their-PC protagonist (typically a male one) and not-their-choices in stone. I think this is the reason why the Baldur's Gate novels failed so spectacularly, actually. Because they couldn't be true enough to the game, at least not without alienating anyone who took a different path through the game to the one they set in stone, they changed the story as to make it unrecognizable. But that still ticked fans of the game off, who bought the books thinking they were getting novelizations of the game, and got something else entirely.

The failure of the Baldur's Gate novelizations is probably the reason why Neverwinter Nights and its sequels never got novelizations (there was an anthology of short stories planned, I think, that never got published).

Zandilar
~amor vincit omnia~
~audaces fortuna iuvat~

As the spell ends, you look up into the sky to see the sun blazing overhead like noon in a desert. Then something else in the sky catches your attention. Turning your gaze, you see a tawny furred kitten bounding across the sky towards the new sun. Her eyes glint a mischevious green as she pounces on it as if it were nothing but a colossal ball of golden yarn. With quick strokes of her paws, it is batted across the sky, back and forth. Then with a wink the kitten and the sun disappear, leaving the citizens of Elversult gazing up with amazed expressions that quickly turn into chortles and mirth.

The Sunlord left Elversult the same day in humilitation, and was never heard from again.
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
14031 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  02:45:19  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf

To Sage and Wooly, I would point out that Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer, itself of likely dubious canonicity, did have a red mage at the academy of transfiguration who transferred his consciousness into a golem (more to allow himself to work his magic forge, which his golem body's resistance protected him from, than for any agelessness it might have provided).
There was also a female dwarf trapped inside a Golem in the comic series (although I couldn't tell you the name - I didn't read the comics, strangely enough). Anyhow, I suppose a very clever Lich could hide his phylactory in plain-site inside a servitor golem... but that isn't quite the same thing. didn't a Drow do that? {we need a head-scratching smiley}

Tan Chin was a Suel Lich (a term from the GH setting) - he was able to be immortal by transferring his 'essence' into a new host. Something like that occurred (quite by accident) to that Shoon Emperor too.

Ergo, we do have precedents of similar soul-transfers, so it should be possible. Makes me also wonder if anyone ever tried it with a dragon (why stop at just a Golem/Automaton?)

quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf

<snip> But what about the ones that haven't? Did Myrkul canonically create a spirit eater curse in Rashemen to sustain his existence outside the Crown of Horns, only to be obliterated by that same curse? Did Waterdeep actually come under siege by Mephistopheles himself?
That happened in an alternate reality... perhaps even on Abeir.... or Earth 2...

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 29 Jun 2010 02:49:09
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30217 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  03:10:12  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

There was also a female dwarf trapped inside a Golem in the comic series (although I couldn't tell you the name - I didn't read the comics, strangely enough).


Her name was Minder. She was the inspiration for more than a couple of NPCs of mine, including one that's done the mind-in-a-golem trick.

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Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 29 Jun 2010 03:10:43
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  04:10:49  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf

What is Mr. Greenwood's stance on the canonicity of the video games? According to the Forgotten Realms wiki, Baldur's Gate, the video game, is technically canon through its novelizations, which I would suspect to be true of any of the games which have been similarly adapted.
Well, I'm not Ed, but... the novels are canon -- so says WotC and the authors of the novels.

And, of course, the games cannot be considered wholly FR canon, as the author, Drew Karpyshyn says, "because of their multiple endings, the BG games can't be considered 'official' in the FR world."

The events of the Bhaalspawn saga as depicted in the novels are canon. We have an entire sourcebook dedicated to the novels -- Volo's Guide to Baldur's Gate II -- as well as the reference in Power of Faerūn, along with the characters from the novels being stat’d up in DRAGON #262 for 2e and the Bhaalspawn template for 3e in DRAGON #288. And Lost Empires of Faerūn.

WotC lists the novels as taking place in 1368 DR and 1369 DR. Jim Butler has also told us the events are canon in 2000 on the FR Mailing List. And finally, Rich Baker, Ed Greenwood and Ed Bonny have all confirmed this as well. For me, that grounds the novels, and only the novels, into the firm bedrock of Realms canon.

Re: the subject of FR canon for the Neverwinter Nights games... Undrentide was marked on one of the maps in Grand History. And the Wailing Death is canon now, given it's reference in Grand History also, under the 1372 DR entry. I don't recall there being an entry for "Hordes of the Underdark." And I remember Brian James suggesting that may be due to the ending of the expansion being difficult to canonise.

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-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  05:26:54  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Zandilar

Heya,


The Baldur's Gate novels weren't particularly good, and I'm sure I'm not the only one that passionately hates them for how badly they adapted the game series. The only things the books had in common with the games is that they shared titles, and some characters had the same names (despite being VERY different). Also, they had a very unlikable protagonist that I found very difficult to relate to.

About the only thing they DID do was give the Realms it's first (I believe) openly gay character in a novel. (And then promptly killed her off, yay... not. )





I don't think it's possible for me to reconcile my seething hatred for Abdel Adrian or the helplessness of novel-Jaheira or the throwaway attitude of every-novel-other-character. Between the total loss of the series' humor and the unlikeablility of nearly every speaking character, the BG novels inspire more nerd rage in me than just about anything else in recent memory.

::Breathes::

These details as regards the canonicity of video games saddens me. I could see the original Neverwinter Nights working with each player's personal canon in comparison to official canon, because it's revealed in one of the expansions that the main character's contribution were downplayed due to a falling out with Lord Nasher.

Aside from that, though, I can't think of much. The games have disproportionately far-reaching consequences, considering how minor the characters within are compared to the greater Realms cast. It's hard to reconcile that.

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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Zandilar
Learned Scribe

Australia
313 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  08:18:55  Show Profile  Visit Zandilar's Homepage Send Zandilar a Private Message
Heya,

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage
And, of course, the games cannot be considered wholly FR canon, as the author, Drew Karpyshyn says, "because of their multiple endings, the BG games can't be considered 'official' in the FR world."



Drew Karpyshyn wrote the Throne of Bhaal novel, the other two are credited to Phil Athans.

I think someone should have listened to Drew... ETA: Of course, I mean apply the same argument to the novels, and considered them just another optional path.

Zandilar
~amor vincit omnia~
~audaces fortuna iuvat~

As the spell ends, you look up into the sky to see the sun blazing overhead like noon in a desert. Then something else in the sky catches your attention. Turning your gaze, you see a tawny furred kitten bounding across the sky towards the new sun. Her eyes glint a mischevious green as she pounces on it as if it were nothing but a colossal ball of golden yarn. With quick strokes of her paws, it is batted across the sky, back and forth. Then with a wink the kitten and the sun disappear, leaving the citizens of Elversult gazing up with amazed expressions that quickly turn into chortles and mirth.

The Sunlord left Elversult the same day in humilitation, and was never heard from again.

Edited by - Zandilar on 29 Jun 2010 09:56:13
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Sill Alias
Senior Scribe

Kazakhstan
588 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  12:48:29  Show Profile  Visit Sill Alias's Homepage Send Sill Alias a Private Message
But the game campaigns can be considered partially true for some facts. For example, was there mention of drow attacks from Undermountain? Was there any mentioning of the Undead army coming from the same Undermountain? At least some facts could be true.

You can hear many tales from many mouths. The most difficult is to know which of them are not lies. - Sill Alias

"May your harp be unstrung, your dreams die and all your songs be unsung." - curse of the harper, The Code of the Harpers 2 ed.
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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3525 Posts

Posted - 29 Jun 2010 :  13:47:15  Show Profile  Send The Red Walker a Yahoo! Message Send The Red Walker a Private Message
THO/Ed,

How big a loss do you consider Halruua to be to Faerun Magical history and Magic users? What I mean is the loss of their art .....would it compare to anything we could equate to?(real world or FR) Something like the loss of the Library of Alexandria or would it be something like Atlantis, seem more legend than reality? Im just curious what of their magical "culture' and spellcraft survived or what legacy they left behind.

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5041 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2010 :  15:38:06  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi, Red Walker. I'd say that the loss of Halruaa is HUGE, but that the magnitude of the loss might well notr be fully appreciated across most of Faerun, because only those who visited Halruaa can truly appreciate it.
Halruaa wasn't just a "land with a lot of wizards, ruled by wizards" as most of the rest of the Realms would probably judge it, it was a land in which most of the small routines of daily life (washing, cooking, movement around the house of household sundries such as clothing, laundry, lighting, heating and cooling, even airflows) were "done by magic." Imagine the "automated house" of many sf stories; well, a fully-enchanted Halruaan domicile would work the same way, with "keyed" (attuned) inhabitants affecting the house around them with either command words or thoughts or both as they move about, live their domestic lives, etc. They also had spell-slates (iBook, anyone? Ed's slates were about the same size and shape) in most every household, onto which distant Halruaans could send brief written messages.
Halruaa didn't have large conventional armies, because it didn't need them. They could magically use wind as a weapon (in addition to skyships, puissant battle-spells, and battle automatons [which can be be blown up from afar by their directors, and so can serve as "walking bombs"]).
And yes, of COURSE they had weather control, and hence very abundant crop yields.
love,
THO
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Kilvan
Senior Scribe

Canada
892 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2010 :  17:13:59  Show Profile Send Kilvan a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay
Anyhow, I suppose a very clever Lich could hide his phylactory in plain-site inside a servitor golem... but that isn't quite the same thing. didn't a Drow do that? {we need a head-scratching smiley}



WARNING: SPOILER from WotSQ






The drow-Lich Dyrr hid his phylactery in the Spider Golem of his house's Temple to Lolth in one of the novel of WotSQ. Gromph Baerne destroyed it (with a greataxe combined with a well-placed Tenser's Transformation).

Oblivion loomed on every side, the offspring lived, basking in the realization that each moment could be the last moment.
--This was the beauty of chaos
--This was the beauty of Lolth
--This was the doom for all, but one

Quote from "Extinction"

Edited by - Kilvan on 30 Jun 2010 17:15:32
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Hoondatha
Great Reader

USA
2394 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2010 :  20:40:05  Show Profile  Visit Hoondatha's Homepage Send Hoondatha a Private Message
One quick question for Ed, THO, or anyone else who might know the answer. I was trying to describe a ring-shape in play recently and kept wanting to call it a "donut." For my future reference, are there places in Faerun that make ring-shaped pastries of some form or another that would be widely enough know that a character could use them to describe what something else looks like? And if so, what are they called. Would it be something like "a Sembian donut," or do they have specific names? Many thanks.

Doggedly converting 3e back to what D&D should be...
Sigh... And now 4e as well.
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Kentinal
Great Reader

4291 Posts

Posted - 30 Jun 2010 :  20:48:33  Show Profile Send Kentinal a Private Message
As I recall, anything that had the FR logo was canon, even if it made no sense, new material replacing any prior print. When Ed speaks, what he says is canon, unless a print article with FR logo says something different. The only other conflict that can occur is if a source book, recent but not last item, should be considered canon. Not sure what is considered recent if dates conflict. In the end WotC decides what is canon and with some policy changes recently announced, it would appear not everything with the FR logo is know considered canon.

This of course leads to a question. What is now considered canon for FR?

"Small beings can have small wisdom," the dragon said. "And small wise beings are better than small fools. Listen: Wisdom is caring for afterwards."
"Caring for afterwards ...? Ker repeated this without understanding.
"After action, afterwards," the dragon said. "Choose the afterwards first, then the action. Fools choose action first."
"Judgement" copyright 2003 by Elizabeth Moon
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
30217 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2010 :  00:19:34  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One


Halruaa didn't have large conventional armies, because it didn't need them. They could magically use wind as a weapon (in addition to skyships, puissant battle-spells, and battle automatons [which can be be blown up from afar by their directors, and so can serve as "walking bombs"]).


Ooh, ooh, I wanna know more about the battle automata!

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Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31690 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2010 :  01:16:42  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One


Halruaa didn't have large conventional armies, because it didn't need them. They could magically use wind as a weapon (in addition to skyships, puissant battle-spells, and battle automatons [which can be be blown up from afar by their directors, and so can serve as "walking bombs"]).


Ooh, ooh, I wanna know more about the battle automata!

Seconded. I also wouldn't mind hearing more about those battle-spells either.

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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bladeinAmn
Learned Scribe

199 Posts

Posted - 01 Jul 2010 :  05:10:49  Show Profile  Visit bladeinAmn's Homepage Send bladeinAmn a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi, Red Walker. I'd say that the loss of Halruaa is HUGE, but that the magnitude of the loss might well notr be fully appreciated across most of Faerun, because only those who visited Halruaa can truly appreciate it.
Halruaa wasn't just a "land with a lot of wizards, ruled by wizards" as most of the rest of the Realms would probably judge it, it was a land in which most of the small routines of daily life (washing, cooking, movement around the house of household sundries such as clothing, laundry, lighting, heating and cooling, even airflows) were "done by magic." Imagine the "automated house" of many sf stories; well, a fully-enchanted Halruaan domicile would work the same way, with "keyed" (attuned) inhabitants affecting the house around them with either command words or thoughts or both as they move about, live their domestic lives, etc. They also had spell-slates (iBook, anyone? Ed's slates were about the same size and shape) in most every household, onto which distant Halruaans could send brief written messages.
Halruaa didn't have large conventional armies, because it didn't need them. They could magically use wind as a weapon (in addition to skyships, puissant battle-spells, and battle automatons [which can be be blown up from afar by their directors, and so can serve as "walking bombs"]).
And yes, of COURSE they had weather control, and hence very abundant crop yields.
love,
THO



So (from a few questions back in this thread) the Red Wizards of Thay never had a prayer in a hypothetical war vs. Halruaa. Juss as I thought. Halruaa is still the main 'power' in my Realms.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5041 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2010 :  17:15:03  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
Wooly and Sage, the automaton we Knights saw (about a dozen identical examples of, plus another three small but otherwise identical specimens), during play, were metal "rolling/walking spiders" consisting of five telescoping (limited-retractible due to successive overlapping metal rings), spider-kneed legs swivel-attached to a common platform 'body.' The legs had rolling spheres at the bottoms for locomotion, but also multiple "traction daggers" for walking on ice, etc, that could be thrust down "past" the ball to lift it out of contact with the ground and make the thing walk on the daggers (fiver per leg). Atop the platform could be multiple things, from a cabin with telefactoring magical gloves to move two fully-articulated, extendable "fighting arms" that could wield blades, spikes, nets, power-slings, and clubs . . . and upsized versions of all of those, plus carry-platforms with lashdown straps and cover-nets, for cargo moving, that lacked a cabin and operator, but could be spell-controlled from afar.
That's the short version. There was also at least one much taller and larger humanoid-form metal "walker," usage unknown, that we saw only from a great distance.
That's my campaign experience. i'm not sure what Ed will reveal, now that I've asked...
love,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 02 Jul 2010 17:16:37
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Hoondatha
Great Reader

USA
2394 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2010 :  18:23:31  Show Profile  Visit Hoondatha's Homepage Send Hoondatha a Private Message
With all this talk of Halruaa's battle magic, much of it descended from Netheril, I figure it's time for a Netheril follow-up: why was Netheril making so much of this battle magic in the first place?

From what I can recall from the Netheril box set, once Netheril dealt with the near-by orcs (in the March to Annhilation, among others), it wasn't really seriously threatened until the phaerimm, and even then most of the nation didn't realize what the problem was. It didn't have great relations with its elven neighbors, but neither was there ever any open warfare. And the only orcs around, the ones to the west, had to get past Delzoun/Eaerlann/Ammarindar before they could reach the Netheril heartlands.

Absent a major driving push like a looming external enemy, what was the motivation for all this experimentation in warfare? I get that some archwizards would be intrigued by it, the same way others were intrigued by the planes, or spelljamming, but the amount of "Netherese battle tech" for lack of a better term that's still lying around nearly two thousand years later points to Netheril having a truly staggering armory. What was the motivation behind its development, and why did the rather decentralized and independent-minded archwizards who ruled Netheril decide it was worth the time/money/magic to create it?

Doggedly converting 3e back to what D&D should be...
Sigh... And now 4e as well.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5041 Posts

Posted - 02 Jul 2010 :  21:53:15  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
Hoondatha, Ed will have to provide a proper answer, of course, but the short-short version of a reply to you would be: for some archwizards, as a deterrent to other archwizards attacking them, for others to keep up with the Joneses, for still others because their deep paranoia drove them to be ready for any challenge, and for others, just to prove they could...and could do it better than rival archwizards.
love,
THO
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
14031 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  00:46:43  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
There were at least two other powerful magical empires at the time - Imaskar and the Shoon Imperium. The Elves were a constant threat (and probably would have attacked if the Netherease weren't so well prepared.) Toward the end of their era they also the empires of Raumather, Narfell, and Jhaamdath (not to mention the 'new' empires of Mulhorand and Unther) to contend with.

They also picked a few fights in both Arcane Space, as well as in the Outer Planes (all canon).

It would seem to me that although they don't appear to have been very militaristic, they were very expansive, and the two go hand-in-hand; one must defend all the lands one takes.

Not to mention that they had a bit of a 'Thay thing' going on - the various Archmages weren't all 'cuddly' with one another (although they were much less fragmented when faced with an outside threat).

Hope that helps, and I will wait upon Ed to correct/clarify/add to that... bearing in mind his Realms did not have a Netheril, or at least not the TSR version of Netheril, IIRC (a lot of the lore associated with it, like Karsus - that all came from another game entirely).

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 03 Jul 2010 00:50:13
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5041 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  03:12:23  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Ed's original Realms certainly had Netheril (it's his creation, flying/floating cities and mighty archwizards, skyships, disaspora after its fall, and all), but the published TSR Netheril is different, yes.
love,
THO
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
14031 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  08:46:20  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
Thank You, THO, for that clarification - I wasn't really sure how much of it was Eds, and how much of it actually came from the plundering of the Dragonquest IP. I only own the rulebook to that old SPI game, and none of the modules, so I could never compare how much was lifted.

Since the story of Karsus does come from there (from what I've read), then might I ask what ended Ed's version of Netheril? Or is only a small part of the Karsus story from that other game, and Ed already had a Karsus-like character responsible for the fall?

Just intellectual curiosity, nothing more; I find it fascinating how many bits and pieces of other worlds wound up in the Realms, long before Abeir ever reared its head.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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Joran Nobleheart
Senior Scribe

USA
489 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  16:04:12  Show Profile  Visit Joran Nobleheart's Homepage Send Joran Nobleheart a Private Message
I'd be interested to hear more about Mr. Greenwood's Netheril too, if you've time, noble lady.

Paladinic Ethos
Saint Joran Nobleheart
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Snowblood
Senior Scribe

Australia
388 Posts

Posted - 03 Jul 2010 :  16:23:21  Show Profile Send Snowblood a Private Message
Me three........

Aryvandaar, Ilythiir, Arnothoi, Orva, Sarphil, Anauria/Asram/Hlondath, Uvaeren, Braceldaur, Ilodhar, Lisenaar, Imaskar, Miyeritar, Orishaar, Shantel Othrieir, Keltormir, Eaerlann, Ammarindar, Siluvanede, Sharrven, Illefarn, Ardeep, Rystal Wood, Evereska are all available here for download:http://phasai.deviantart.com/gallery/
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