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Hoondatha
Great Reader

USA
2392 Posts

Posted - 23 Jun 2010 :  19:57:28  Show Profile  Visit Hoondatha's Homepage Send Hoondatha a Private Message
That's really intersting. Ed, how long would such a trip take, just using the current? And how much would it speed up by a ship using its sails?

Doggedly converting 3e back to what D&D should be...
Sigh... And now 4e as well.
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13604 Posts

Posted - 23 Jun 2010 :  23:09:09  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
Thank you very much, Ed (& THO).

@Hoondatha - tides were discussed not too long ago. The Ocean current runs clockwise in the Western ocean (with Evermeet at the center) - you can see that on the large map that came with the Maztica product, as well as being discussed on pg. 47 of the Maztica Alive! booklet that came with same product:

quote:
"Cordell and the Golden legion made this crossing in some forty days, which is about typical for the Sword Coast to Maztica route. It takes about sixty days to sail back, due to the easterly current. A northerly route of return can save fifteen days on this trip, but requires sailing dangerously close to the random teleporters surrounding Evermeet."


Wind, on the other hand, is another matter, and changes with the seasons. 'Most' of the time a NE wind runs up the Swordcoast, meaning that coastal vessels will travel faster heading north then south.

What this means is that if you throw a log into the water in Waterdeep, it will slowly drift down the coast and eventually across the sea. If you put a small, make-shift sail on the self-same log, it would instead travel north (a bit faster then the sluggish water-current would take it), and end up in Neverwinter, or beyond.

I wouldn't even begin to guess what havoc the various Elven protections wreak with the weather-patterns in the center of the Sea, but I'm sure it takes a very experienced captain to take advantage of all the shifting winds. 'Drifting' just may be the safest - albeit slowest - method of crossing.

So sayeth Mark, who spends way too much time studying the science behind an imaginary world.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 25 Jun 2010 00:01:19
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Malcolm
Learned Scribe

242 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  02:44:52  Show Profile  Visit Malcolm's Homepage Send Malcolm a Private Message
I vaguely remember hearing a TSR staffer of the day (Jeff Grubb? Tim Brown?) say something about internal designer discussions re. this, recounting Ed telling them about pirates sailing NE across The Sea of Swords to Luskan, trading and dumping cargoes and reprovisioning and so on in that port, then slipping south along the coast using conjured winds in their sails (they would hire wizards in Luskan to provide the spells, which were small-scale so as to affect just one ship, not have wider effects that would anger other sailors). The wizard would get transport down to Tharsult, and the pirate ship would then slip away to do piracy in the southerly waters...
Ed? I have this right, don't I?
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Kyrene
Senior Scribe

South Africa
648 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  09:03:30  Show Profile  Visit Kyrene's Homepage Send Kyrene a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Malcolm

I vaguely remember hearing a TSR staffer of the day (Jeff Grubb? Tim Brown?) say something about internal designer discussions re. this, recounting Ed telling them about pirates sailing NE across The Sea of Swords to Luskan, trading and dumping cargoes and reprovisioning and so on in that port, then slipping south along the coast using conjured winds in their sails (they would hire wizards in Luskan to provide the spells, which were small-scale so as to affect just one ship, not have wider effects that would anger other sailors). The wizard would get transport down to Tharsult, and the pirate ship would then slip away to do piracy in the southerly waters...
Ed? I have this right, don't I?


Not Ed (obviously), but you are correct. A ship's wizard was also used in such ways in Under Fallen Stars (the second in the Threat from the Sea trilogy).
SPOILER: Two ship's wizards took 'watches' to conjure winds (and possibly other spells) strong enough to propel the 'commandeered' (hi-jacked) vessel up the River Chionthar against the current. This was part of an escape plan after the attack on Baldur's Gate.

Lost for words? Find them in the Glossary of Phrases, Sayings & Words of the Realms

I am a sexy, shoeless god of war!

The Sellplague began, for all intents and purposes, in the dominions of the Corporation. Greed murdered Good Design, unraveling common sense in the cosmos and destroying her dominion. At the same time, Sales Fears and Warcraft Envy happened into alignment. This cataclysmic coincidence led to upheaval, shaking apart the primeval order, opening up holes in wallets, and reshaping everything...
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  17:39:09  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
Ed now makes reply to part of a question createvmind posed back on page 29 of this thread: "Would a Orc Shaman or leader consign a comatose warrior to death rather than trying to nurse him back to consciouness. Would this be seen as a weakness of the afflicted orc?"
Ed replies:


Well, the answer really is "it depends." On the circumstances (or perceived circumstances) in which the warrior became comatose, and on the personal character of the shaman or leader, and the traditions and prevalent views of the orc clan, family, or community they both belong to.
In some cases, it would be seen as a sign of the gods consigning the comatose warrior "to themselves" (so he should be left to them, i.e. abandoned but not otherwise harmed), in others, that the orc should be gently conveyed to an altar, temple, or sacred spot and left there for tending or "to the mercies of the gods," and in still others that he should be forthwith "sent to the gods" (i.e. executed, promptly, as is), either as punishment or reward.
My underlying point here is that orcs are as complex and varied in their views as humans, so there is no single "right" or "will almost always do thus" answer.
(I understand that you posted this not so much as a direct question but as an illustration of what you were trying to learn [my thinking, rather than "rules"] when you posed questions to me in this thread. So take this as an illustration of my usual thinking, which is "this, but on the other hand that, with complicating elements being A, B, C, and D, so there's usually not a definitive answer, but we can suggest this much" . . . which, I suppose, suggests why some real-world government decisions seem to take so long, be so complicated, and sometimes fall so short of dealing with perceived problems.)


So saith Ed. Who, as you can see, thinks and thinks until his thinker gets sore.
(Or so I thunk, anyway.)
love,
THO
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Blueblade
Senior Scribe

USA
804 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  20:47:09  Show Profile  Visit Blueblade's Homepage Send Blueblade a Private Message
Re. this, from GoCeraf: "What are some of the preferred board games among some of the FR characters? Specifically, I'm curious about Elminster, Shandril, and maybe Alustriel."
I'm thinking Shirestone, that Ed mentioned at several GenCons, and maybe Swordsman At The Bridge, that he talked about at the last Milwaukee GenCon.
Shirestone is a "track" game of strategic movement where the moves are earned by winning "tricks" at cards, if I remember it rightly, and Swordsman At The Bridge is one of those games played by moving pegs stuck into a pattern of holes drilled in a small sqaure piece of wood, where the "bottleneck" in the hole-pattern is the bridge, and one side is numerically superior (the "Wolves" or "Goblins") to the other (the "Swordsman"), but the Swordsman is a stronger "piece" than any of its foes.
THO? Ed?
Am I on the right track here?
BB
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Baleful Avatar
Learned Scribe

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  20:48:51  Show Profile  Visit Baleful Avatar's Homepage Send Baleful Avatar a Private Message
Hmmm. Is "Swordsman At The Bridge" similar to Ed's "Chasing the Leucrotta"? That one was moving pegs, with two forces involved...
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 24 Jun 2010 :  21:47:59  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Blueblade

Re. this, from GoCeraf: "What are some of the preferred board games among some of the FR characters? Specifically, I'm curious about Elminster, Shandril, and maybe Alustriel."
I'm thinking Shirestone, that Ed mentioned at several GenCons, and maybe Swordsman At The Bridge, that he talked about at the last Milwaukee GenCon.
Shirestone is a "track" game of strategic movement where the moves are earned by winning "tricks" at cards, if I remember it rightly, and Swordsman At The Bridge is one of those games played by moving pegs stuck into a pattern of holes drilled in a small sqaure piece of wood, where the "bottleneck" in the hole-pattern is the bridge, and one side is numerically superior (the "Wolves" or "Goblins") to the other (the "Swordsman"), but the Swordsman is a stronger "piece" than any of its foes.
THO? Ed?
Am I on the right track here?
BB



I wish I were more versed with Realms trivia, 'cause I'd love to be able to drum up knowledge like that without asking.

Actually, and I should have been more specific in my original query, I was more curious about it in the way that a psychology professor might ask such a question. Something along the lines of "If you were an alcoholic beverage, which one would you be?" So the question itself, even though I failed to specify this, would have likely restricted the answers to Earth board games or those in the Forgotten Realms that are closely analogous to our games such that they could be explained by citing one as a reference point.

Forgive me, for I am an engineer. Our questions only run in two dimensions

All the same, thanks, Blue.

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  02:02:14  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
GoCeraf, I bring you Ed's answer to your question:


In terms of real-world board games, Elminster would like chess, or more precisely, a variant of chess (of the sort collectively known as "faery chess," down the decades) in which certain pieces can temporarily go invisible, and/or be disguised for a time as other pieces.

Shandril would like one of the more complex "follow the track" games, in which one moves along a path, getting somewhere, and dealing with hazards that come up along the way. If she had to play a game with the Knights, it'd be a classic card game: Mille Bornes, the road rally game.

And Alustriel would love a 'builder' game, like Thurn und Taxis (the coach-route-building game), Rail Baron, or something of the sort.

If El and the Chosen were playing together, it's be Empires of the Middle Ages, all the way. :}


So saith Ed. There you go, GoCeraf: a swift reply from Ed, who's Spinning a Yarn as I post this.
love,
THO
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  04:31:36  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all.
GoCeraf, I bring you Ed's answer to your question:


In terms of real-world board games, Elminster would like chess, or more precisely, a variant of chess (of the sort collectively known as "faery chess," down the decades) in which certain pieces can temporarily go invisible, and/or be disguised for a time as other pieces.

Shandril would like one of the more complex "follow the track" games, in which one moves along a path, getting somewhere, and dealing with hazards that come up along the way. If she had to play a game with the Knights, it'd be a classic card game: Mille Bornes, the road rally game.

And Alustriel would love a 'builder' game, like Thurn und Taxis (the coach-route-building game), Rail Baron, or something of the sort.

If El and the Chosen were playing together, it's be Empires of the Middle Ages, all the way. :}


So saith Ed. There you go, GoCeraf: a swift reply from Ed, who's Spinning a Yarn as I post this.
love,
THO



Thanks, as always, for the correspondence, THO.

Here's hoping there's a nifty sweater to be had, soon.

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31688 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  04:51:21  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi again, all.
GoCeraf, I bring you Ed's answer to your question:


In terms of real-world board games, Elminster would like chess, or more precisely, a variant of chess (of the sort collectively known as "faery chess," down the decades) in which certain pieces can temporarily go invisible, and/or be disguised for a time as other pieces.
As an comedic aside to this, my lovely Lady, can I also ask whether Elminster would be a fan of any of the "themed" chess sets we often see for sale? Obviously, the themed 'Lord of the Rings' chess set is a consideration, I suppose, but I'm really looking for options that, perhaps, wouldn't be so immediately considered.

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Joran Nobleheart
Senior Scribe

USA
489 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  05:16:26  Show Profile  Visit Joran Nobleheart's Homepage Send Joran Nobleheart a Private Message
I could kind of see a Red Wizard theme, with the Simbul being the opposing side. Big surprise the Queen has all the power, right?

Paladinic Ethos
Saint Joran Nobleheart
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Menelvagor
Senior Scribe

Israel
352 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  07:27:35  Show Profile  Visit Menelvagor's Homepage Send Menelvagor a Private Message
Are there variants of 'strip' gmaes in the Realms? And if so, how widespread are they? Would El be the kind of guy to go to for a game of strip chess? Lastly what kind of games would Azoun enjoy?

"Shall mortal man be more just than God? shall a man be more pure than his maker?
Behold, he put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly.
How much less them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation in the dust, are crushed before the moth?" - Eliphaz the Temanite, Job IV, 17-19.

"Yea, though he live a thousand years twice, yet hath he seen no good: do not all go to one place?" - Ecclesiastes VI, 6.

"There are no stupid questions – just a bunch of inquisitive idiots."

"Let's not call it 'hijacking'. Let's call it 'Thread Drift'."
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gomez
Learned Scribe

Netherlands
254 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  09:12:50  Show Profile  Visit gomez's Homepage Send gomez a Private Message
In 4th ed, the Harpers are now a small group only limited to Luruar.
They are quite a different organisation than the old (3rd ed) Harpers.

I deduce that means that Storm no longer belongs to the Harpers, and neither does the other people that surround and aid Elminster and Storm.
If that is correct (?), then does that small groep of aides have their own name? If so, what is it, or, if not set in stone, what would Ed suggest?
Or would they rather stay nameless and only be known as the former Chosen's friends?
Also, names of those aides (other than the ones I suggested above) would be welcome ;)

Also, do the Knights of Myth Drannor still exist?
If so, how would one join them? And if not - would that means the name is available for a new group - not necessarily affiliated with Cormyr, but maybe Myth Drannor itself?.

Gomez,
who fears that the answer will be NDA, NDA, NDA, maybe.... but let's hope for the best :P

Edited by - gomez on 25 Jun 2010 09:32:28
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Zireael
Master of Realmslore

Poland
1190 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  10:23:58  Show Profile  Visit Zireael's Homepage Send Zireael a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Menelvagor

Are there variants of 'strip' gmaes in the Realms? And if so, how widespread are they? Would El be the kind of guy to go to for a game of strip chess? Lastly what kind of games would Azoun enjoy?



Which Azoun?
I don't think El would. Too old.
Azoun IV enjoyed chess (Cormyr: A Novel).

SiNafay Vrinn, the daughter of Lloth, from Ched Nasad!

http://zireael07.wordpress.com/
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Hoondatha
Great Reader

USA
2392 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  13:39:13  Show Profile  Visit Hoondatha's Homepage Send Hoondatha a Private Message
Age has never slowed El down before, no reason why it should here. And from his history, finding attractive lasses to play the opposing side probably wouldn't be much of a problem either.

Doggedly converting 3e back to what D&D should be...
Sigh... And now 4e as well.
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createvmind
Senior Scribe

490 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  14:48:51  Show Profile  Visit createvmind's Homepage Send createvmind a Private Message
THANK YOU!
THAT WAS AN AWESOME ANSWER, I LIKE ORCS MORE NOW!
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Menelvagor
Senior Scribe

Israel
352 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  16:44:57  Show Profile  Visit Menelvagor's Homepage Send Menelvagor a Private Message
Yes, but what else besides Chess did Azoun enjoy?

"Shall mortal man be more just than God? shall a man be more pure than his maker?
Behold, he put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly.
How much less them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation in the dust, are crushed before the moth?" - Eliphaz the Temanite, Job IV, 17-19.

"Yea, though he live a thousand years twice, yet hath he seen no good: do not all go to one place?" - Ecclesiastes VI, 6.

"There are no stupid questions – just a bunch of inquisitive idiots."

"Let's not call it 'hijacking'. Let's call it 'Thread Drift'."
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  17:05:58  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
gomez, your deduction re. Storm's 4e membership in the Harpers is incorrect. I have a strong suspicion that the Harpers lore in the 4e Campaign Guide is "what most folk believe" rather than the truth. We may all learn a little more about this soon. Which is about as far as I can go, given the NDAs in force at the moment.
Ed can probably reply to your other queries (again, given NDAs, "a little"), so of course your queries have been sent on to him, to see what comes back for us all . . .
love,
THO
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Sill Alias
Senior Scribe

Kazakhstan
588 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  17:24:48  Show Profile  Visit Sill Alias's Homepage Send Sill Alias a Private Message
You almost killed my heart when you said about diminishing numbers of Harpers. What lady said makes sense: with the structure of Harpers it is impossible to destroy all the network, even weaken, as said in 2ed book Code of the Harpers.

I wanted to give the great messenger of the Power of the Realm greater than Ao and DMs some questions from 'little' category to throw in heap.

What effects have mixing of alcohol drinks does with magic potions, starting from the healing to the great arcane conoctions? What harmful effects can occur and what good can come of it if there are good ones? Does somebody do that?

You can hear many tales from many mouths. The most difficult is to know which of them are not lies. - Sill Alias

"May your harp be unstrung, your dreams die and all your songs be unsung." - curse of the harper, The Code of the Harpers 2 ed.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  17:37:24  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all.
Back on page 44 of this thread, sfdragon asked: “Can you share tips and advice on writing stories ???”
Ed now replies:


Certainly. Herewith, a few REAL basics, for the beginner.

1. Do it on computer, and save working versions of your files and backups (NOT just on the hard drive, but on “thumb” USB drives, diskettes, out on the Net, etc.). Handwritten or typewritten just doesn’t cut it these days. DO print out physical copies.

2. Start small. It’s easy to bog down on a novel, or a long, sprawling story. Most novels have chapters for a reason. Take small steps, get them done, and eventually your longer journey will be done.

3. Have a plot. A “story” isn’t just an ongoing sequence of “and then this happened” events. You should have a plan, an arc of action, and something to say that’s worth someone’s time to read it. Don’t just “start writing,” except to get the feel of characters or to sketch in the setting.

4. Stories happen to people (though they might be talking flying skulls, dragons, or hissing serpents, not humans). “People” as in: characters the reader cares about, so what happens “matters.” You have to make the reader care about them, so focus on a few characters so you can do that.

5. Writing the story chronologically is sometimes easiest for a novice writer, but it’s also the way to bog down over “difficult” scenes. Think of GOOD “rock videos” that tell stories: a few very brief scenes, skillfully edited, to pack a lot of information into a very short time. If you bog down, stop trying to write from beginning to end, and just write those key scenes. Now, assemble them and read them, then consider: can the rest of it all be left out? What’s the minimum you can tell the reader, for the story to make sense and the “big scenes” to really have impact? Do that minimum, and no more. We don’t need endless descriptions of characters brushing their teeth or getting dressed. If it doesn’t enhance your tale, leave it out.

6. End with something solid or dramatic or both. There doesn’t have to be a trick or surprise at the end, but avoid ending a story in such a way that the reader exclaims, “Huh? Is that it?” and looks to see if a page has gone missing. You want the reader to be satisfied at the end. Desperately wanting more, perhaps, but feeling they saw enough that they know “how things turned out, thus far.”

7. Avoid trouble: don’t use copyrighted characters or settings, or real persons or companies, without permission. There are of course exceptions to this, but know your ground before you rush headlong over it. When in doubt, always create something new. For one thing, it adds to our collective creative experience, whereas borrowing the familiar is less bold, less rich, and adds less for us all (think of endless Hollywood sequels and remakes, compared to the excitement of something good that’s NEW).

8. Tell your tale as simply and clearly as you can. (Good grammar and proper spelling, but also clear description so the reader is never in doubt about who’s speaking, or who has the glowing sword.) If you don’t know what a word means, look up its meaning or don’t use it. Avoid the empty, overblown jargon favored by many pundits, government spokespersons, and the like. I have a house full of books; I’m not going to be impressed by your ability to include big words, especially where they aren’t appropriate, or just confuse the storytelling.

9. Don’t switch points of view in the same scene. If you want to show us X’s inner thoughts, fine - - but if you then want to jump inside the head of Y, start a new scene. EVERY time. If the result is forty-six scenes, each a paragraph long, you’re doing it wrong, and the reader has probably plunged into motion sickness and given up reading some time ago.

10. Keep things moving. Not every part of a story has to be a race or chase scene, or hurtle along at breakneck pace, but the writer should be aware of the pacing of a story when it’s “finished,” and rewrite to guide that pace to take away scenes or passages that just bog down.

11. Don’t be afraid to rewrite. You’re using words that have been used millions of times before; they aren’t sacred. Don’t say a story is “done” until it’s told.
Which is NOT the same as “until you’re happy with it.” Some people NEVER stop tweaking and polishing a story, and usually end up with something that’s flat and painstakingly detailed and “overwritten.” Worse: they can no longer see its flaws, because they’ve worked on it SO long and hard. That’s why I said to save draft (working) versions, earlier; sometimes, you should go back to an earlier version of the story.

12. Do it. Don’t endlessly plan your writing and detail characters and places but never get around to writing. That’s like trying to become a top tennis player by endlessly buying gear and books and watching tennis on television. To get good at writing, you have to do it. A lot. Over and over. Like everything else, you get out of it what you put into it. Everyone can play “air guitar,” but can you dash off sizzling guitar solos on the real thing? If you’ve never even held one?



So saith Ed. Setting forth some of the REAL basics for us all. Pray heed, all scribes who intend to write.
And to those who feel moved to snidely observe that Ed breaks these rules, I’ll add this, as a sometime professional editor: It’s okay to break rules, in writing, but you MUST know the rules and break them deliberately, not blunder along and break them without knowing it - - or the result will always be bad.

Love to all,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 25 Jun 2010 20:52:06
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Baleful Avatar
Learned Scribe

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  20:55:16  Show Profile  Visit Baleful Avatar's Homepage Send Baleful Avatar a Private Message
Beautifully put. I'm going to print, clip, and save this last post of Ed's. Nothing new to me, but simply and clearly put and ESSENTIAL for any writer (because, as proclaimed, it's a few of the basics, and we can all use the reminder from time to time).
Thank you, Ed.
We all owe you so much, we scribes here at the Keep: your world, your friendship, your handy lore retrieval, your writing new stuff just for us (for free, yet!), and the xample you set for us all.
Thank you.

Edited by - Baleful Avatar on 25 Jun 2010 21:02:54
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13604 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  21:32:48  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
First, a question:

In another thread we are discussing Askavar - it is mentioned as a 'lost kingdom' in the 2e FR box, so I figured I'd AskaEd (terrible pun, I know).

Can't really find anything else about it, even in places which should include info, and it appears to have been misnamed Anauria in an article in Dragon 222, adding to the confusion.

Got anything for us?

Second, I was going to say that there are exceptions to all the rules you put forth, but you better be a damn talented writer in order to get away with it. However, it appears THO has once-again covered her bases (if not her 'soft parts' ) with that bit at the end.

I can tell you that Frank Herbert's Dune takes an axe to #9 and locks it in a cell with no key... yet it works. The original movie version, however, tried to maintain that 'feel', and what we got was a rather silly 'telepathetic' thing going on showing everyone's thoughts throughout the film. Note: What works in a novel doesn't always work of the silver screen.

Thanks for the advice, Ed - I can see myself guilty of several of those mistakes (most notably items 11 & 12). When I'm a published author I'll have to dedicate my first novel to you (of course, we may both be in our second century by then...)

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 25 Jun 2010 23:00:38
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Malcolm
Learned Scribe

242 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  21:35:58  Show Profile  Visit Malcolm's Homepage Send Malcolm a Private Message
Yes, to echo BA, these writing basics are much appreciated. I also appreciate Ed's kindness, humor, and upbeat "happy guy" approach, which remains a bright lantern here at the Keep when other threads are often darker with conflict, these days . . .
I suspect Ed will miss Paizocon and Origins again this year, because he just can't afford to travel to them, and he never grouses about not getting rich from gaming.
When (okay, if) I grow up, I want to be like Ed Greenwood.
Thanks, Ed.

And I would be remiss if I didn't also thank our kindly, teasing, flirtatious (and, hey, MUCH appreciated for that! sometimes it's like online chat sex, in here!) Lady Hooded. Thank you for bringing us Ed and your own memories and smiles...
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5037 Posts

Posted - 25 Jun 2010 :  21:40:59  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Why, thank you!
(With all this praise ringing out, I'd just like to point out that neither Ed nor I are dead, dying, or thinking of retiring from the Keep or from gaming, yet. )
love to all,
THO
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