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Garen Thal
Master of Realmslore

USA
1081 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  21:52:16  Show Profile  Visit Garen Thal's Homepage Send Garen Thal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Blueblade

Okay, I'll bite, Ed: if you had unlimited time and unlimited space to expand THE SWORD NEVER SLEEPS (not extend the story into the Dales, but add in "more" up until that chronologial point, and you weren't worried about pacing, what would you show us more of?
In other words, if you were stuffing more lore into the story without having to worry about bloating or slowing down the narrative, what lore would make it in?
Thanks!
BB
I can answer this one, if Ed will let me. [Of course, he'll add to it, but I cannot resist.]

Everything.

More of Alusair's iron will, more of Azoun and Filfaeril's love (whatever made it past the censoXXX editors), more of Vangerdahast's infinite gears in Cormyr's great machine, more machinations and traitors, more plots brewing behind the scenes, and more schemers, noble and common, trying to take advantage but not simply being "villains." More nobles trying to be heroes, and a few heroes that just happen to already be nobles, too.

More than that, though: more of the Knights showing that being heroes isn't always glamorous work, and that it takes quite a bit of blood to make that armor so shiny.

Oh, and more history, more foreshadowing of events that have already happened, more threads for readers and DMs to pull and tug on in order to make whatever they'd like the Realms post-novel to look like come true.

May he one day get the chance.

BC
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:13:59  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Well said, Brian! Very well said! I'm sure Ed will have very little to add to that.
I know he's told me he LOVED doing the Alusair scenes, and would do more of them, but feels guilty that Tanalasta didn't get enough "face time," in the third Knights book.
Not to mention the Knights themselves didn't get enough scenes, and the hargaunt and the two "ghosts" got all too little explanation and exposure.
So, sigh, "everything" about covers it. :}
love,
THO
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Baleful Avatar
Learned Scribe

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:21:36  Show Profile  Visit Baleful Avatar's Homepage Send Baleful Avatar a Private Message
On a recent business trip, I ran into a fellow traveler in an airport lounge who said he'd played in a "library campaign" set in the Realms and DM'd by Ed years ago. He said it was very enjoyable, had some set goals laid down by the adventuring charter granted to the PCs, was in Cormyr, one of the PCs was a bastard daughter of Azoun IV and didn't know it until the last few sessions, and the play was very low-level, with almost no magic beyond the party's puny magic-user and some one-shot potions and scrolls (oh, and a glowing +1 dagger the party used as a lantern) found as treasure. No wizards, no War Wizards except as an offstage threat, very "let's find food" survivalist level (and they loved it).
My question is: is this typical of Ed's campaign play? His detractors like to decry his superhero-strong "good" NPCs, Elminster swooping in to save the day, and all of that. Is that due to TSR/Wizards, or Ed? I know he has very little control over the Realms, and hasn't had for years, but I'm curious as to "Ed's real Realms."
When Ed is running the Realms, is it "heavy intrigue and almost no orcs," as this former player commented?
Thanks!
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Blueblade
Senior Scribe

USA
804 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:28:02  Show Profile  Visit Blueblade's Homepage Send Blueblade a Private Message
Well, I've played in the Realms at a convention with Ed as the DM, in a one-shot session, and there was TONS of intrigue (sinister nobles and courtiers in Cormyr, trying to get control of a gate/portal to a ruined lodge in a forest in the Dales). Aside from some minor enchanted swords some of the nobles had (that glowed, when drawn), the gate was the only magic we encountered, except for the spells of the PC clerics and wizards (which were few and weak, thanks to our levels).
So yes, from my limited experience, I'd say that IS typical of "Ed running the Realms." He likes to confront PCs with floating talking heads or skulls or some other sort of creature the party will think is powerful but not know the real abilities of, though, just to get players talking in character rather than mindlessly hacking.
And I've heard from others who've played with Ed of wizards (NOT Elminster or any of the Chosen) literally having "walk-on" parts in the games they played, where the wizards strode past ignoring the PCs, unless the players were idiots enough to have their characters try to attack them.
BB
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Malcolm
Learned Scribe

242 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:31:48  Show Profile  Visit Malcolm's Homepage Send Malcolm a Private Message
Heh. I can top that. I've played in a session where Ed was the DM, and briefly played Storm Silverhand as an NPC giving the PCs (all of them were Harpers) instructions on a mission, in her farmhouse. She flirted and calmly dodged someone else's assassination attempt and spoke to Sylune (whom we never saw or heard), and served us all tea.
Then we set out on the adventure, and never saw her again. I loved it, but it certainly didn't seem like misusing a super-character to any of us. And no, she didn't take any of her clothes off.
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Longtime Lurker
Seeker

51 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:32:37  Show Profile  Visit Longtime Lurker's Homepage Send Longtime Lurker a Private Message
Darn.
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Blueblade
Senior Scribe

USA
804 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:33:33  Show Profile  Visit Blueblade's Homepage Send Blueblade a Private Message
Ah, but the question is, did she take any of YOUR clothes off?
BB
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Baleful Avatar
Learned Scribe

Canada
161 Posts

Posted - 09 Jan 2009 :  23:37:50  Show Profile  Visit Baleful Avatar's Homepage Send Baleful Avatar a Private Message
Gentlemen, gentlemen, we have GOT to get some new jokes in here. On the table, right about now.
(And no, that wasn't a suggestion directed at THO.)
Rather, I have another (serious) question for Ed. In a typical small rural village in the Heartlands, not on a major trade-route, what sort of selection of ointments, medicines, and jars of folk remedies for sickness or wounds or infections would be available? True antidotes for snake bites or insect stings? (I'm not talking magic, here, just physical stuff.) Or does it vary too much to give a "typical" village answer?
How common is good medical knowledge, among village elders or local "wise women" or whatever?
Thanks!
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  02:25:26  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
I took it as a command, good sir, so here I am. On the table, wearing nothing but a smile and my wristwatch.
Any takers?

love,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  02:34:11  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Ahem. Realms questions, yes.
Baleful Avatar, the low-magic and few brute-beasties, more intelligent adversaries and intrigue, intrigue, intrigue is DEFINITELY the order of the day in an Ed-DM'd Realms campaign. Listen not to all the slanderous calumny of "PCs are powerless because it's the Seven all the time, nude except when clad in randy old Elminster, Ed's Mary Sue" talk. Unless players send their characters to actively seek out the rulers amongst the Seven, they will rarely appear in play.
Elminster tends to show up (rarely and for short periods) as a narrator, or "last ditch hint" provider, not a PC ally or superhero who overshadows PC actions. He generally seems whimsical, kindly but sarcastic, a few bricks short of a load, and VERY busy, teleporting "in" for a few moments and then "out" again, moving on to deal with his NEXT crisis. He feeds PCs a sense of excitement, of layers of intrigue they haven't thought about and conspiracies all around them yet hidden . . . and occasional "ye might try this" advice, and that's it.
Otherwise, he's just "not there" most of the time, and PCs blundering into his Tower will find it mysteriously deserted and empty, or that they've been gated halfway across the Realms or into the Underdark as they step across the threshold, or that some frightened Zhentarim adventuring band or other has stepped into the Tower ahead of them, and is now anxiously trying to fight their way back out, through the PCs.
love to all,
THO
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RodOdom
Senior Scribe

USA
509 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  05:08:08  Show Profile  Visit RodOdom's Homepage Send RodOdom a Private Message
Perhaps TSR / WotC made a mistake statting out Elminster and other characters over the years. Too many have mistaken the setting as being about the Chosen, instead of using them as effective plot devices.

Another question for Ed and THO : of the menial jobs in Waterdeep, I think few could be more dangerous than sewer maintenance, with all the criminal going-ons, creatures, and traffic to and from Skullport and Undermountain. What precautions and defenses does the Dungsweepers guild require of their brethren? Does the trade have an especially high "turnover"? Do journeymen end up with the most perilous duties, or is there some system that spreads the risk around? Sincerest thank yous.

Edited by - RodOdom on 10 Jan 2009 05:24:46
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Garret.Dorigan
Acolyte

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  20:11:20  Show Profile  Visit Garret.Dorigan's Homepage Send Garret.Dorigan a Private Message
Hello good Lady and kind sir! I've been lurking on these forums for, literally, years, never registering to ask a question or any some such. Just reveling in the copious amount of bubbly Realmslore thrown about in all of the topics... but I have an exciting (Albeit personally exciting.) turn of events come my way that force my hand to post a query.

I am not a player. (Gasp!) My only playtime with any pen and paper was a short lived 2nd Edition jaunt into the Realms in my formative years. (I believe I was 6.) But, that started me onto Realms fiction. After passing around some of my novels to friends who DO play, I have been aproached to be a "Subject Matter Expert" (Although I feel not nearly qualified )for the DM on anything he may need clarification on. He has also approached me about playing a recycleable PC, a character that basically does the same as I do for him, just for the three sets of players and their characters. After tirelessly pooring over all of the author scrolls I feel somewhat equipped for this challenge, but there are a few questions posed that I don't have answers for... thus, I come here. And now that the personal narrative is over, the list! (Dun dun DUNNN!!)

1) In one of the scrolls there was a question about Genasi in the Realms, and I believe there was talk of either Para-/Quasi-Genasi (Or one subset specifically.) and whether they could be found in the Realms, though the memory becomes fuzzy. Anyway, I second whatever the original question was and wish to tack on as it were. What regions specifically, if they are even in the Realms, would Para-/Quasi- Genasi be found in, more frequently? Also, would they be acknowledged as being Para/Quasi, or would most learned folk just say they are one of their parental Genasi?

2) Do certain regions have a specific armor setup for their armies, much like Dark Ages countries had specific quirks for their armies in our world? Not so much on the point of "The Purple Dragons wear plate most of the time, Sembians..." but more that, do regions wear different helm types to stand out from others and what are some examples if so?

3) Where, if anywhere, could one find a trenchcoat? Not in a type made famous by the Matrix movies, but more along the lines of the character of Jeffery Chauser in 'A Knights Tale'. A better description would most likely be, similar to a French toggled longcoat of the Hundred Years War.

4) Is there Brigadine in the realms? And if so, where could one find an armorer to convert coats and vests to such? My guess would be Cormyr, but...?

5) Are there any jobs in the Realms that are un-glamorous but well paying, in the same vane as American garbage men (I'm sorry, Sanitation Professionals.) making almost $50,000 a year in most regions?

I talk overmuch. I apologize for being verbose, but they have posed specific questions to me. (Minus the Genasi question, that is in relation to my charater.) I await for you to reply at your leisure Ed.

Now, Ms. Wristwatch-and-a-Smile, I do have questions specifically for you, but I'm sure that this scroll is not the place to speak of such things.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  20:16:25  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Why, Garret.Dorigan, what wonderful questions! Off they go to Ed, who I'm sure will at least have a stab at starting to answer them very swiftly.
As for your questions for me, purrrrrr. I await them, whenever and wherever. I'll even take off my wristwatch.

love,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  20:17:01  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hello again, all. I bring you Ed’s latest serving of Realmslore, this time a beginning on replying to the eight Thunderstone-and-vicinity questions posted by Asgetrion back in mid-December.
Here’s the query Ed’s dealing with in today’s post:
“Greetings, Milady THO and Ed! I have been running a Pathfinder Beta playtest campaign, which is set in Thunderstone, in Cormyr. I have written a lot of material for it, but since a lot of the events in the campaign have taken place outside the town, the players have not interacted a lot with NPCs outside their "inner" circle (i.e. families and shopkeepers and prominent allies, such as tutors). I'm still fleshing out details, and filling in stuff as the campaign progresses and the PCs are drawn deeper into local intrigue, and therefore I have a plethora of questions for you:
1) Which noble families have holdings in or around Thunderstone?”
Ed replies:



(The time of the lore that follows is around 1370 DR.)
Between the Thunderflow and (a line of hills that borders) the Vast Swamp is a verdant band of farming and ranching country (rolling, grassy hillsides, hedgerows, wandering dirt lanes and small woodlots) and it’s also what’s sometimes referred to in our real world as “karst” country (springs rise, run along the surface, and then disappear down sinkholes, and there are lots of subterranean streams, hidden caves, and limestone, which means most waters run clear and pure). It’s well-watered by meltwater streams running southwest, down from the Thunder Peaks, and the prevailing winds (usually fairly constant, steady, mild breezes) mean it gets a lot of sun; clouds tend to scud swiftly across the sky, not settle in and cause overcasts. As a result, crops grow well and livestock fattens up swiftly, so a lot of wealthy Cormyrean families (and that of course includes the nobles) have holdings here, even if they’re only farms worked by commoner tenants.
That doesn’t mean that the same “lot” of noble families visit Thunderstone often, or own dwellings in or near the village.
In Thunderstone proper, the Hawklin family owns a row of stores along “the Rise,” the main street (that parallels the Thunder River), and two homes: a modest dwelling with stables in its own small walled orchard and garden, hight “Thundershaws” and used for putting up guests, business clients, and sometimes by certain Hawklins who want to entertain away from the rest of their kin; and Hawklinforce, a stone mansion with its own high stone walls, stables, wagon sheds, and brewhouse. From “the Force,” local factors (trade agents) of the Hawklins administer the dozen ranches and crop farms (cabbages, barley, oats, and parsnips) owned by the family, and rent out family coaches and wagons to locals for divers purposes. As a result, the Hawklins are prominent locally, their views respected and heeded.
The Huntsilvers maintain a lower local profile. Their tall-towered stone mansion is known as Hunting Castle, and has an impressive stone wall and stout front gates, but isn’t otherwise fortified. It is perhaps the most defensible large building in Thunderstone, but its small enclosed grounds are crowded with large, old trees (oaks and duskwoods), the boughs of some of which offer easy access to some of the lower Castle windows. There are persistent local rumors of secret tunnels connecting the cellars of Hunting Castle (which are said to contain all manner of gruesome sacrificial cult altars or Loviatar-loving flogging and trysting “dungeons”) with secret passages in the walls of scores of local buildings. According to Elminster, there are two secret passages, meant to allow olden-day Huntsilvers to arrive and depart without being seen by kin or slayers hired by rival noble families, they are guarded by helmed horrors, and there are no altars or pleasure-dens.
In Thunderstone, the Huntsilvers generally keep to themselves, moving about the village in closed coaches or on fast horses. They use Hunting Castle very much as a retreat, in which to read and catch up on hobbies (such as, for several Huntsilver ladies, crafting gowns and practicing at the lute, handharp, and with voice, and reportedly for some Huntsilver males, wenching with “laugh-pretties” brought up from Suzail for such purposes). The family owns about thirty farms, all worked by tenants, well to the south and southwest of Thunderstone.
Hunting Castle and Hawklinforce both back onto the Thunderflow, having their own (modest and largely disused) docks and boathouses, and face onto the “best” street in Thunderstone, the winding Nightcloak Ride, which is lined with most of the better old stone dwellings in the village. It lies largely north and west of the Rise, but hooks sharply south just west of Stag Skull’s Bridge, to intersect with, and end at, the Rise.

The Illances, Naerinths, Summerstars, and Wyvernspurs all own modest walled stone homes in Thunderstone, but visit them seldom (in the general way of nobility, such “nighthearth” houses are used as overnight way-stops when travelling, to host occasional meetings with business associates, and as retreats or trysting sites by individual family members. These four families are locally most active elsewhere (the Summerstars in Firefall Vale, which I shared lore about back in the 2004 replies here at the Keep, I believe [Sage or Wooly or Kuje, please jump in and correct my dating if I’m misremembering], and the other three noble houses largely to the north of the Hullack, or at least of the Thunderflow.

The Immerdusk noble family owns four old but solidly-built homes in Thunderstone, and owns six farms just south of the village proper. All are worked or inhabited by tenants, and Immerdusks are so seldom seen in this region that many locals believe them to be extinct, and that the factors speaking for them are actually courtiers working for the Crown, who just won’t admit that they’ve taken over the chattels and holdings of the Immerdusks.

House Indesm owns a shop on the Rise and maintains very modest lodgings (a suite of four rooms, occupying an entire floor) above it, with the shopkeeper and his family dwelling in the gabled and dormered attic above them. However, they are seen in Thunderstone seldom, and come and go without fanfare or much in the way of coaches, outriders, servants, and the like. The Indesms own sixteen ranches and farms, mainly east of Thunderstone. All are worked by tenants, though the Indesms visit and inspect them often. This family keeps mainly to the hold of Hawkhar (sometimes called Hawkhar Keep or more often and formally “Hawkhar Hall,” though most folk these days now call it simply “Hawkhar”), consisting of a fortified stone mansion and tower at the heart of a walled horse-farm where many fine mounts are bred, reared, and trained. The walls also enclose a small woodlot and orchard, and have an outer “thrust” or loop of wall, pierced by two always-open gates, that cradles the hamlet of Hawkhar, a small settlement dominated by the families of Indesm servants.

The Indesms are typical of most Cormyrean nobility in the countryside; they have and dominate their own settlement or hold, and only visit and rent or own dwellings in the villages, towns, and cities of the realm. The other three Thunderstone-home-owning noble families follow this pattern, too; they are the Houses of Buckfast, Haelbroke, and Yellander.
For more about the Yellanders, interested readers are directed to SWORDS OF DRAGONFIRE. This House did not end with the execution of the lord who featured therein, because King Azoun would not hear of the three estranged and blameless-of-treason Yellander nieces who dwelt in Suzail being shamed and paupered by the actions of Lord Prester Yellander. The War Wizards had already thoroughly upset the three with sudden, brusque mind-reamings (which confirmed their utter innocence; they were wholly unaware of Lord Prester’s drug-smugglings, or his assembling of a private army and the murders he directed them to do). One of the three nieces, Anathae, was a longtime friend and confidant of Queen Filfaeril, who took charge of the rather dazed Anathae and briskly steered her into marriage to a commoner she’d long had eyes on, a Palace courtier by the name of Hresker Falbruin. So there’s now a capable and tactful Lord Hresker Falbruin, charged by Queen Fee with finding suitable and happy mates for Anathae’s two sisters, Paerile and Tannaura (a process that is taking years because both of them are rather shy, delicate ladies and Hresker, Anathae, and Filfaeril are all agreed that the very last thing that should happen is settling them with less than ideal partners).
Hresker and Anathae Yellander now dwell in Whitewings (the renamed Yellander seat in Galdyn's Gorge, a modest, unwalled keep-and-attached stone mansion surrounded by gardens and a deep, wooden-spike-filled ditch to discourage marauding wilderland monsters; its new name comes from all the doves raised for food by Anathae’s longtime maids, who came from farming families known for their flavourful dove pies), visiting Suzail only for major Councils and at the end of summer. Prester Yellander’s simple, rustic hunting lodge on the edge of the Hullack Forest sits disused, and will soon fall into ruin if not maintained.
Less well known in Suzail are the poorer, more rustic local noble families of Buckfast and Haelbroke. These “true bloods of the Thunderflow” lead lusty lives of running their farms directly, brewing and distilling, imbibing the results, and hunting from the saddle.
They also seem to have “ridden” great numbers of willing local lasses, and are impoverished in part because of all the bastard offspring they help to support - - which has linked them, time and again, to divers local families, businesses, and farms.
Their byblows have been sent literally by the score into the ranks of local Purple Dragons, who are inclined to look the other way at Buckfast and Halebroke indiscretions, which in turn has encouraged male members of these houses to becoming accomplished rakes, drunkards, and local “rowdies” behind many a local brawl, wildly whooping midnight gallop, accidental fire, and prank.
The current patriarch of the Buckfasts is Lord Rothtil Buckfast, whose hardy, lusty, fun-loving mate is Lady Suvreene Buckfast, and they dwell with three sons (including the family heir, Ravance) and five daughters at the family seat of Buckhaven Hall, a walled manor house and ‘home farm’ in the countryside east of Thunderstone. This “heart of the Buckfasts” household also rents rent two rooms above a chandler’s (“Maerikho Hayhondlow, Chandler to High and Low”) on the south front of the Rise.
Other prominent Buckfasts include Melhard, a fat and blustering old bellower of a rake with a legendary capacity for drink, and Sargram, an aging but still deadly fighter-of-duels and bedder of anyone female and handy (the reason for a lot of those duels; noble wives are his favourite quarry, and his outrageously leering flirtatiousness [or “charm” as the ladies tend to prefer to call it] seems to conquer many of them).
The current head of House Haelbroke is Lord Larandyr Haelbroke, a haughty, humourless retired soldier (he recently departed the rank of ornrion, a West Reach posting, in the Purple Dragons when his father Lord Uskarr Haelbroke died, his mother Dardorra having predeceased Uskarr). Larandyr’s stunningly beautiful wife is Lady Mirljarla Haelbroke (formerly a Truesilver), and they dwell with their two daughters, Tasharra (the family heir) and Raedaera at the family seat of Buckhaven Hall, a rather spartan walled keep and ‘home farm’ in the countryside west of Thunderstone. They also rent a luxurious house on Nightcloak Ride in Thunderstone (Nightowl Roost, which is owned by Storm Silverhand but managed for her by the suave estate manager Maland Orlstand of Suzail, a secret Harper) where Lady Mirljarla spends increasing amounts of time entertaining noble lady friends “come out from Suzail to see the rustics.” A glowering Lord Larandyr rarely attends these visits, and the couple’s two daughters are caught in a tussle between their parents for their time and attention (although Tasharra and Raedaera, who have both inherited their mother’s raven-black hair and smoky-eyed good looks and buxom curves, dearly want to see the latest “cityside” fashions and manners, they both LOVE riding, ruling, weapons-practice, and all the other “lordly” stuff their father wants to teach them and do with them, that are more often the province of male nobles when their female counterparts are confined to empty-headed chatter in parlors and “lace-chambers”).
Other prominent Haelbrokes include Galragar, Mresper, and Borlingar. Galragar, the eldest, is Larandyr’s uncle, and the other two are his cousins. Galragar is a fair-haired, unshaven, rollicking meaty bull of a man, load and coarse and jovial. Borlingar is a younger, dark-haired echo of Galragar, whereas Mresper is sly, witty, slender, and agile. All three are tirelessly-energetic roisterers, wenchers (Mresper may on occasion also prefer young and handsome male partners), and fun-seekers, the bright stars of every revel they take part in. They are always thinking up some new “society” or club or prank, some entertainment for themselves and those who “ride with them” to take part in; Larandyr’s last attempt to host a solemn feast for Suzailan lords he desired to impress was “pranced” (in the real world, we would say “crashed”) by Galragar and Borlingar leading a dozen strapping local lads, most of them wealthy or highborn or both, all riding horses and wearing heavy makeup and beautiful womens’ gowns, garters, and all, into the ballroom to a skidding dismount and wild dance with the attending - - and utterly astonished - - noble lords. This is a typical prank, neither a highlight or lowlight, but it strengthened Larandyr’s cold distaste towards all three of his “wild wolves” of kin, whom he disowns and shuns at every opportunity. (His house wizard, a lean and homely mage by the name of Baerglan Dunstag, who is of course a War Wizard, refuses to let Larandyr bar his gates to the three or move to try to legally dispossess them [an effort that would fail, anyway, as only the Crown can strip someone of their rightful heritage, and then only by exiling them and taking away their citizenship as well], but Larandyr refuses to recognize or speak to them, always addressing cutting remarks to any of the three to any handy servant or statue or potted plant, loudly enough for the shunned kin he wants to hear, to do so. For their parts, the three are amused at Larandyr’s attitude, not upset or ashamed.)
Those are the living nobles. There are indeed a handful of extinct ones that will serve for answering your second question. For now, enjoy (I hope) this lore.



So saith Ed, whose deep love for Cormyr shows. Damian, will you be a dashing knight and update the Cormyr compilation thread?
love to all,
THO
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
29635 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  20:54:19  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

(snip)
These four families are locally most active elsewhere (the Summerstars in Firefall Vale, which I shared lore about back in the 2004 replies here at the Keep, I believe [Sage or Wooly or Kuje, please jump in and correct my dating if I’m misremembering], and the other three noble houses largely to the north of the Hullack, or at least of the Thunderflow.
(snip)



March 4th, 2004.

http://forum.candlekeep.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1901&whichpage=5

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Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 10 Jan 2009 20:56:38
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31683 Posts

Posted - 10 Jan 2009 :  23:52:03  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

(snip)
These four families are locally most active elsewhere (the Summerstars in Firefall Vale, which I shared lore about back in the 2004 replies here at the Keep, I believe [Sage or Wooly or Kuje, please jump in and correct my dating if I’m misremembering], and the other three noble houses largely to the north of the Hullack, or at least of the Thunderflow.
(snip)



March 4th, 2004.

http://forum.candlekeep.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1901&whichpage=5

Actually, to save scribes the efforts of scrolling down to find that particular entry, I'll improve on Wooly's linking attempt and remind scribes that Ed's entry on Firefall Vale was specially prepared for the "Realms Lore" section of Candlekeep here:- http://www.candlekeep.com/library/articles/firefall.htm

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
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crazedventurers
Master of Realmslore

United Kingdom
1073 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  00:07:33  Show Profile  Visit crazedventurers's Homepage Send crazedventurers a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hello again, all. I bring you Ed’s latest serving of Realmslore, this time a beginning on replying to the eight Thunderstone-and-vicinity

So saith Ed, whose deep love for Cormyr shows. Damian, will you be a dashing knight and update the Cormyr compilation thread?
love to all,
THO


My Pleasure Good Lady - more outstanding Lore to help us build our own Realms upon.

Please pass on my personal thanks to Ed

Now, I just need to do a bit of 'creative backfilling' to fit some of this into my Thunderstone and the current campaign, the PC's are going to have a suprise or three very soon.....

Cheers

Damian

So saith Ed. I've never said he was sane, have I?
Gods, all this writing and he's running a constant fantasy version of Coronation Street in his head, too. .
shudder,
love to all,
THO
Candlekeep Forum 7 May 2005

Edited by - crazedventurers on 11 Jan 2009 00:19:41
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crazedventurers
Master of Realmslore

United Kingdom
1073 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  00:18:58  Show Profile  Visit crazedventurers's Homepage Send crazedventurers a Private Message
Question on Eveningstar if I may please?

On the map featured in the Haunted Halls of Eveningstar and the Waterdeep modules (Avatar Crisis), there is a second river/stream shown to the west of the Starwater bordering the Temple lands - what is is called please and is it more stream than river?

Thanks

Damian

So saith Ed. I've never said he was sane, have I?
Gods, all this writing and he's running a constant fantasy version of Coronation Street in his head, too. .
shudder,
love to all,
THO
Candlekeep Forum 7 May 2005
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  02:34:32  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Damian, I'm away from my notes at the moment and can't recall the name, so will have to wait for Ed to answer, but it is indeep more stream than river, and I THINK had "stream" in its name, locally, as in "XXXX Stream."
Sigh. Getting old, memories going . . .
In the meantime,
hello again, all. As promised, Ed has a very swift reply for most of Garret.Dorigan’s questions (the exception is the Genasi query, which Ed has to consult about; his preliminary opinion is that most humans don’t distinguish well between sorts of genasi, though halflings and elves and gnomes do), so here we go:


“2) Do certain regions have a specific armor setup for their armies, much like Dark Ages countries had specific quirks for their armies in our world? Not so much on the point of "The Purple Dragons wear plate most of the time, Sembians..." but more that, do regions wear different helm types to stand out from others and what are some examples if so?”
Ed replies:

All armor is of course handmade, and almost every helm is subtly different.
However, in general, as of 1370 DR, most realms in the Heartlands have helms for knights, nobles, cavalry and officers that resemble real-world historical “great helms” in general looks (full front “prow” faceplate, with two eyeslits and some breathing-holes down near the lower front or beak), except that the frontplate IS a hinged visor, either up-and-down or side-hinged. A gorget to protect the throat will be worn underneath, and usually this goes with plate armor that has an upstanding protective collar that fits outside the helm (and the head wearing it, so there’s room to turn your head without striking your own collar), too. Some sort of plate armor is usual for armored persons of such rank.
General infantry wear chainmail with breastplates, backplates, and plate-fittings at all the joints (elbows, shoulders), and have helms like historical barbutes or “Milanese” style: open slit down the front that widens into two eye-holes at its top, separated by a reinforced noseguard. Castle guards and bodyguards will have better armor than this “augmented” chainmail.
Militia will wear conical “cap” helms or older salvaged helms of all sorts, usually with an attached throat and neck-guard of leather-studded-with-sewn-on salvaged (and thus irregular in size and shape) metal plates. Their armor may be just about anything, from heavy leather “jacks” on up.
The only general comments that can be made about helm styles are these: Aside from the “show” guards flanking some city gates, the gates of Piergeiron’s Palace, and the front gates of Castle Waterdeep, Waterdeep has EVERYTHING, because its folk come from everywhere and merchants and local armorers are constantly introducing new designs. Cormyrean helms are rather English in looks, lacking the pointed “duckbill” or “beak” visors of French design, but the armies of Tethyr, Amn, the Vilhon, and (because they’re mercenaries, drawn from elsewhere [such as the Vilhon]) Westgate and Sembia DO have basinet-style helms with those pointed visors. The sallet (helm with sweeping or lengthened “tail” or back-of-neck-guard) style of helm is favoured in Tethyr and down the Sword Coast, but less often seen elsewhere. And finally, Cormyrean helms tend to have rounded tops, but Sembian helms (and those of Chessenta and around the eastern Inner Sea) have “tall,” pointed-top shapes (in other words, high peaks that enclose some empty air above the scalp).
These are generalizations, remember, because only a few realms have large standing armies with anything approaching a “uniform equipage code” (the Purple Dragons are one such force). Two of the original series of FR supplements (the Horde Campaign and Gold & Glory) have Osprey-style paintings of typical military uniforms of the day that can be consulted for a “general look,” but in a pinch, an individual warrior can be wearing almost anything and the DM can explain it away as a local variance (some places have blacksmiths rather than skilled armorers, and some armories and garrisons have only a few “bright and presentable” suits of war-harness, in only a few sizes, and improvise for everyone else, covering the worst bits with strapped-on shields and bindings of cloth that echo the proper battle-colors on everyone else’s surcoats.



“3) Where, if anywhere, could one find a trenchcoat? Not in a type made famous by the Matrix movies, but more along the lines of the character of Geoffrey Chaucer in 'A Knights Tale'. A better description would most likely be, similar to a French toggled longcoat of the Hundred Years War.”
Ed replies:

As I recall, the Chaucer character showed up NAKED in that film. :} It was the Black Prince (in the scene with Heath Ledger’s hero in the stocks) who wore a magnificent longcoat.
To answer your question for the Realms, you can find such coats almost anywhere in the Heartlands and Sword Coast North, worn by those who must stand or walk distances in the outdoors in almost all seasons except the hottest summer months (and even then, in prolonged driving rain, someone with access to his longcoat might get it out). They are made by tanners and leatherworkers in many, many Faerûnian communities. However, they tend to be owned and worn only by those of means (nobles and the wealthy, and higher-ranking officers); most non-combatants and those of less coin in the Realms wear “weathercloaks” instead, which are almost-down-to-the-ankle-length cloaks, lighter than leather and lacking fastenings except brooches (pins). Weathercloaks blow around more and don’t provide as much protection against cold winds, being as they cling to the arms and shoulders when pinned shut.



“4) Is there Brigandine in the realms? And if so, where could one find an armorer to convert coats and vests to such? My guess would be Cormyr, but...?”
Ed replies:

One can find armorers to do such work in many, many places (cities, large market towns along trade routes, and in dwarven and gnome-dominated settlements everywhere), because reinforcing garments with sewn-on or secured-with-links metal strips is journeyman and ’prentice work, and (like sharpening knives and daggers) part of the daily “bread and butter” coin-earning livelihood of any armorer or smith (yes, any smith can make brigandine, though really good overlapping or not-obvious-as-brigandine-to-the-eye brigandine requires a skilled armorer or at least the close supervision of someone with those skills).
However, making brigandine also requires a skilled leatherworker (the same sort of skills needed for leather or hide armor, or splint mail work, or the making of leather underpadding for full coat-of-plate armor). One can’t just attach shaped pieces of metal to an existing garment; the result will be something that “hangs heavy,” hampering the wearer’s movements, that doesn’t provide proper overlapping coverage during battle (when one twists, trots, swings weapons, and so on), and that can even cut or bruise the wearer. Proper brigandine requires taking the garment apart and rebuilding it in overlapped layers, with a lot of new leather being sewn on.
Any armorer good enough to keep a business going for more than a season will have a spouse, children, aging parents or other relatives, or apprentices or journeymen working for him or her who can do the necessary leather-work to make brigandine armor, or will be able to do the leather-work him/herself. Brigandine armor rots and falls apart (thanks to the metal reinforcements cutting into the leather when struck by weapons, and thanks to rust discharges and the weight of the metal) faster than most other sorts of armor, so repaired secondhand brigandine armor is a plentiful commodity - - but secondhand brigandine armor requiring MORE repair is even more plentiful in shops and smithies.
However, the short answer to your question is that armorers can be found in almost all cities and large towns, and many other places along trade routes or in dwarf or gnome (or orc, for that matter!) communities, and that all armorers can modify garments into brigandine armor. Whether they will agree to do so or not is, of course, a roleplaying matter.



“5) Are there any jobs in the Realms that are un-glamorous but well paying, in the same vein as American garbage men (I'm sorry, Sanitation Professionals) making almost $50,000 a year in most regions?”
Ed replies:

Yes, but how plentiful these jobs are, what they are, and the local definition of “well paying” varies widely across the Realms. For instance, gravedigging is poorly-paid and unglamorous in some places, but very well paid in others. Sewer-work in Waterdeep (because it’s guilded work, and highly dangerous to boot) is VERY well paid, but unpleasant and unglamorous. Stonemason-work concerned with fortifications (castle and wall repairs, or shoring up vaulted cellars everywhere, as well as “mining” to enlarge cellars or tunnels or privy-chutes, plus lining same to prevent collapses) is generally unglamorous and underappreciated by wider society, but is always well paid. Animal-training (and monster live-capturing, which is almost always adventurers’ work) tends to be unglamorous but well rewarded. So, for that matter, is finding and bringing back alive or in good condition rare plants (or eggs) for herbalists and alchemists. The painting and plastering of grand rooms in palaces and nobles’ mansions, and the styling of hair and the custom fitting and making of garments for such persons, is also generally unglamorous but well paid. And so on. In some communities, smiths, plumberers, and butchers (slaughterers) are paid well for unglamorous work. So are bed-nurses for royalty and nobility, particularly those who bathe, tend, and guard the mad or long-term-afflicted . . . and royal or noble tasters, who sample the food and drink of important persons to “take the fall” for them if bad cooking or murderous malice are suspected.
I could go on listing particular occupations in particular places for a long time. In general, if a job is dangerous or unpleasant and the hirer wants discretion (or absolute secrecy) from the person doing that job, rewards are high. One seldom thought-of such job is the person who discreetly writes love letters or job applications or delicate apologies on behalf of noble or royal patrons, or wealthy patrons seeking to deal with nobility or royalty. In short, a scribe who poses as another person, writing for them and keeping both the writing task and the contents of what was written VERY secret. A variant on this (believed to be the source of one court lady’s fortune, some centuries ago in Cormyr) is the writer of “lust tales” [explicit porn] or “heartwarms” [flowery romance] intended only for the eyes of one royal patron (and sometimes written “to order,” naming specific persons or acts to be described). In rarer cases, bards secretly hire others to write their jokes, or royal patrons hire others to write “their” ballads and witty poems.



So saith Ed. Who will, I fondly trust, return with the reply to Asgetrion’s second question (about extinct noble families in the Thunderstone area) tomorrow.
love to all,
THO
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Garret.Dorigan
Acolyte

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  02:51:56  Show Profile  Visit Garret.Dorigan's Homepage Send Garret.Dorigan a Private Message
Ah, a speedy reply! Thank you much both Lady and Sir. I'm sure once I relate these answers to the concerned parties I will come back with more questions. And I can't wait for the answer on Genasi.

Also, Ms. Hooded, some of my questions to you are in a message to you.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  03:04:35  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hel-LO, dahling. I have received that message, and have replied. I like to be quick, too. Sometimes.
love,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 11 Jan 2009 03:06:13
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rjfras
Learned Scribe

261 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  06:23:34  Show Profile  Visit rjfras's Homepage Send rjfras a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Baleful Avatar

Gentlemen, gentlemen, we have GOT to get some new jokes in here. On the table, right about now.
(And no, that wasn't a suggestion directed at THO.)
Rather, I have another (serious) question for Ed. In a typical small rural village in the Heartlands, not on a major trade-route, what sort of selection of ointments, medicines, and jars of folk remedies for sickness or wounds or infections would be available? True antidotes for snake bites or insect stings? (I'm not talking magic, here, just physical stuff.) Or does it vary too much to give a "typical" village answer?
How common is good medical knowledge, among village elders or local "wise women" or whatever?
Thanks!


Ed's reply back on March 4th of 2004 might be a good place to start about medical knowledge in the Realms. You can find it here http://forum.candlekeep.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1901&whichpage=5
It's towards the top of a long reply and the part you want starts out "Bookwyrm, I see medical knowledge as varying widely across the Realms, but" and consists of 5 short paragraphs.

Edited by - rjfras on 11 Jan 2009 06:25:36
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RodOdom
Senior Scribe

USA
509 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  06:32:28  Show Profile  Visit RodOdom's Homepage Send RodOdom a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Garret.Dorigan


5) Are there any jobs in the Realms that are un-glamorous but well paying, in the same vane as American garbage men (I'm sorry, Sanitation Professionals.) making almost $50,000 a year in most regions?



Garret, did my question about the Dungsweeper's guild lead to this question? Or is it coincidence?

Edited by - RodOdom on 11 Jan 2009 06:32:51
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Garret.Dorigan
Acolyte

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 11 Jan 2009 :  23:03:58  Show Profile  Visit Garret.Dorigan's Homepage Send Garret.Dorigan a Private Message
quote:
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Garret.Dorigan


5) Are there any jobs in the Realms that are un-glamorous but well paying, in the same vane as American garbage men (I'm sorry, Sanitation Professionals.) making almost $50,000 a year in most regions?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Garret, did my question about the Dungsweeper's guild lead to this question? Or is it coincidence?


Quite coincedence, actually. I had the 'Post a reply' screen open for a long while (Confirming the content of the questions with Aren, the DM.) before actually sending it. The last reply I saw was THO's containing the 'wristwatch' comment. Meh, great minds think alike, eh?
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RodOdom
Senior Scribe

USA
509 Posts

Posted - 12 Jan 2009 :  01:14:46  Show Profile  Visit RodOdom's Homepage Send RodOdom a Private Message
And fools rarely differ !
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