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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  14:51:15  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi, Jorkens. Ed drew on the World of Tiers series for the "mechanics" of gate operations, not for inspiration. Before that PJF series was published, Ed had already read the William Morris THE WOOD BETWEEN THE WORLDS classic (as mentioned in that Dragon article, I believe) as well as Narnia and many other fantasy classics that use the "stepping from our world into another, and back again" conceit, such as John Masefield's THE MIDNIGHT FOLK. So these far older classics were his inspiration . . . and a later series that was itself in part inspired by Farmer, Zelazny's Amber series (we have Roger's own words "proving" this inspiration, in the old Dick Geis THE ALIEN CRITIC fanzine), "inspired" Ed more in fleshing things out, later. Many modern fantasy authors, from Moorcock to H. Beam Piper, have used various versions of what might be called "the Multiverse" (and has been, by some) as part of their fantasy tales - - and Ed's library holds examples of most of them.
This is a topic that Ed and I (and Ed and lots of others, including many TSR designers) have talked over many a time.
love,
THO
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13103 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  15:56:32  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

Any chance you can send me [via ethereal mail] the "steamier" version my lady? I just thought of a rather humorous encounter I can run for my PCs in the next stage of my campaign, based on this. But I'd like to read Ed's full take on it first.

Please refrain from fiddling with the CK servers after you read that... at least for a little while...

or until you take a cold shower....

quote:
Originally posted by Brimstone

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Very Cool.

And here I thought I was the only 'streaker' left around.


-

A VERY long time ago, when there was a LOT less of me to expose.

Its a pretty funny story too, but this isn't the place for that.

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 27 Feb 2009 15:56:58
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  16:12:10  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
Markustay, does, uh...

Does involuntary streaking count?

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3521 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  16:16:36  Show Profile  Send The Red Walker a Yahoo! Message Send The Red Walker a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

So saith Ed. Who in this case has toned down a tale that in some ways was rather steamier.
Ah, such a gallant, defending the reputation of a hooded lady . . .
Or not.
love to all,
THO
Any chance you can send me [via ethereal mail] the "steamier" version my lady? I just thought of a rather humorous encounter I can run for my PCs in the next stage of my campaign, based on this. But I'd like to read Ed's full take on it first.




There you go again my friend, Sagifying another innocent scoll!!

Oh yeah, campaign encounter my arse......we are sure you had an encounter in mind though......


oh well,.....HHHHIOTWIG!!

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963

Edited by - The Red Walker on 27 Feb 2009 16:17:47
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13103 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  18:11:36  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
If Candlekeep were a Video-store, the Sage's scrolls would be the ones they keep "in the back".

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  19:40:06  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
SUCH a to-do. I walk around my house naked all the time.
One more recollection: part way back to my room, I did in fact loosely tie the nightgown around my waist, so the ends hung down one hip, so I could read in the elevator more easily without breaking the spine of the book or risking dropping it.
I met no one in the elevator, but two hotel guests in the corridors. My favourite was the old man in tux who stopped, looked me up and down, bowed, and murmured, "VERY nice, my lady. Very nice. I thank you . . . and good night." He smiled, put his key in the door (yes, even large chain hotel rooms had KEYS in those days, folks), and went into his room. A classy gentleman, very American (tartan bowtie with the tux). I suppose he's long dead, now.
Which reminds me . . .
Jorkens, I think Moorcock is the last of the prominent old guard, now. LeGuin, too, though I've always counted her as the next generation of fantasy writers. Then there's the debate about John Jakes . . .
love,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 27 Feb 2009 19:43:51
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khorne
Master of Realmslore

Finland
1071 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  20:27:47  Show Profile  Visit khorne's Homepage  Click to see khorne's MSN Messenger address Send khorne a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One


Jorkens, I think Moorcock is the last of the prominent old guard, now. LeGuin, too, though I've always counted her as the next generation of fantasy writers. Then there's the debate about John Jakes . . .
love,
THO

Isn't David Eddings rather old guard-ish too? Or is he a decade or so too late?

If I were a ranger, I would pick NDA for my favorite enemy
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  21:20:23  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Eddings is the right age to squeak in to "old guard" territory, but he and his wife didn't start writing and publishing fantasy (as opposed to HIGH HUNT) until decades after the "old guard" writers started. So to readers who know nothing at all about the writers, but only the passing parade of fantasy for sale, he "comes much later."
From the English-language commercial fiction viewpoint (i.e. not including old folk tales, but novels written for sale, which starts us in Victorian times), we have the Victorians and Edwardians (Morris, Dunsany, Eddison), the pulp-era writers (Howard, Burroughs, Brackett, Quinn, Lovecraft, Vance, Kuttner, Moore, etc.), Tolkien, and then the flood of post-Tolkien imitators and other fantasy writers who rise to prominence (or continue on from their pulp roots) during the founding of the commercial fantasy genre that THE LORD OF THE RINGS spawned.
These are VERY rough-n-ready deliniations, and everyone prefers their own, but that's a simplified way of looking at it. Eddings makes his mark with the Belgariad starting in 1982, well after the first post-Tolkien flood.
Leiber, Moorcock, PJF, and so on got to our bookshelves first.
I was starting to work in publishing back then, so it seems clearer to me than it will to someone "looking back" from now.
love,
THO
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2949 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  21:26:18  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message
Piers Anthony and McCaffrey are of course alive still. I always count Moorcock to the next generation, with the 60's and Hawkwind. It started to seem like Williamson was immortal, but by now Moorcock, Ellison and Harrison are the veterans.

Zelazny also wrote a foreword to an edition of A Private Cosmos where he talked about getting the inspiration for Amber.

The theme of Amber and Tiers with the Lords and Princes leads me to another question. Was there ever an idea that the larger gates of the Realms were tied to a certain group or such, that had tied the planes together? Or were the numerous gates the results of the various mages throughout the multiverse working on their own?
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GoCeraf
Learned Scribe

147 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  23:00:48  Show Profile  Visit GoCeraf's Homepage Send GoCeraf a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Red Walker

quote:
Originally posted by The Sage

quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

So saith Ed. Who in this case has toned down a tale that in some ways was rather steamier.
Ah, such a gallant, defending the reputation of a hooded lady . . .
Or not.
love to all,
THO
Any chance you can send me [via ethereal mail] the "steamier" version my lady? I just thought of a rather humorous encounter I can run for my PCs in the next stage of my campaign, based on this. But I'd like to read Ed's full take on it first.




There you go again my friend, Sagifying another innocent scoll!!

Oh yeah, campaign encounter my arse......we are sure you had an encounter in mind though......


oh well,.....HHHHIOTWIG!!



Dude, just be glad he hasn't said something like "woot" yet. Every time he does, I feel like the Earth shifts off its axis.

Being sarcastic can be more telling than simply telling.
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High
Moderator

Australia
31683 Posts

Posted - 27 Feb 2009 :  23:31:12  Show Profile  Send The Sage an AOL message  Click to see The Sage's MSN Messenger address  Send The Sage a Yahoo! Message Send The Sage a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Please refrain from fiddling with the CK servers after you read that... at least for a little while...

or until you take a cold shower....
Or LARPing with the Lady K, if you know what I mean. *snicker*
quote:
Originally posted by The Red Walker

There you go again my friend, Sagifying another innocent scoll!!
"Sagifying" is here. No scroll is safe!
quote:
Oh yeah, campaign encounter my arse......we are sure you had an encounter in mind though......
Well, I did have role-playing in mind when I replied to the Lady Hooded One. See my reply to Markus above re: what type of role-playing I was thinking about.
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

If Candlekeep were a Video-store, the Sage's scrolls would be the ones they keep "in the back".

[Ralph Wiggum voice]"All the people are hugging."[/voice]
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

SUCH a to-do. I walk around my house naked all the time.
I used to. But after nearly 20 years of the typical "gamer lifestyle," I'm a little self-conscious now. And that's probably also why the Lady K hasn't yet approved my desire for us to allow "Strip High Dragon" during our gaming sessions.
quote:
Originally posted by GoCeraf

Dude, just be glad he hasn't said something like "woot" yet. Every time he does, I feel like the Earth shifts off its axis.

Is "neato!" okay then?

Candlekeep Forums Moderator

Candlekeep - The Library of Forgotten Realms Lore
http://www.candlekeep.com
-- Candlekeep Forum Code of Conduct

Scribe for the Candlekeep Compendium -- Volume IX now available (Oct 2007)

"So Saith Ed" -- the collected Candlekeep replies of Ed Greenwood

Zhoth'ilam Folio -- The Electronic Misadventures of a Rambling Sage
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  02:16:08  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Ahem. Well, Ed left out the nipple clamps, among other things, Sage. Just so you know . . .
Hello again, fellow scribes. Early this month, krownhunter07 posted: “Hello Ed, I'm new to posting here at the Keep, but I'd really like to know a few things you might have a mind to answer for me...
Firstly, do you know, or could you come up with, any information about where Evermeet is now and what is around it? Still an island or part of a larger area? Friends, enemies, a little history about what's happened since the Spellplague?
Also, any details on the other Elf blades?
Thanks in advance!”
Ed replies:



Hi, krownhunter. As Daviot mentioned, the best answer to your question about Evermeet’s fate is to be found in the 4e Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. I can say that the “shift” during the Spellplague was interesting, to say the least, because the stresses on the elven magic warding the island created many chaotic, short-lived portals and other effects that hurled persons and magic to many places (including Toril’s sister world, Abeir; elsewhere on Toril, primarily in Faerûn; and other planes entirely). Most of these people and things arrived unscathed in their new locations, but of course were in no way “safe” from bad things happening to them once they arrived there.
Ashe Ravenheart ably summarized the fates of the blades for you, and sfdragon was quite right to speculate that the Artblade is “likely under a huge NDA.” I wish I could say more, but right now, I really can’t. Sorry!



So saith Ed. Creator of Evermeet, Faerûn, and the concept of elven high magic.
Who is undoubtedly hard at work writing, as I post this.
love to all,
THO

Edited by - The Hooded One on 28 Feb 2009 02:17:22
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A Publishing Lackey
Seeker

74 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  02:48:08  Show Profile  Visit A Publishing Lackey's Homepage Send A Publishing Lackey a Private Message
Well, if you expand things to sf as well as fantasy, the periods of prominence shift somewhat.
But let's take a look:
McCaffrey born 1926, publishes short stories in the early 50s, but first novel is Restoree in 1967.
Moorcock born 1939, short stories that later became Sojan first pubbed in the 1950s, Golden Barge written in 1959 but not pubbed until 1979, first novel The Sundered Worlds (later titled The Blood Red Game) magazine-serialized starting in 1962 (it introduced the Multiverse!).
Farmer born 1918, first sf short story 1946, gains prominence with The Lovers, magazine-published in 1952 but not a novel by itself until 1961.
Piers Anthony (Jacobs) born 1934, first sf short story pub 1963, first novel (Chthon) in 1967.
Ellison born 1934, first sf short story 1956, first sf books both in 1960.
Harrison born 1925, first sf short story 1951 (sf and comics illustrator before that), first sf novel Deathworld in 1960, though most Stainless Steel Rat fiction that was put together into the 1961 book SSR published before Deathworld.
Vance born 1916, first sf short story pubbed 1945, first book The Dying Earth in 1960.
Eddings born 1931, first non-sf book High Hunt in 1973, first fantasy Pawn of Prophecy (Belgariad Book 1) in 1982, all fantasies co-written with his wife Leigh.
So as THO said, it's not really a matter of age or strict dating, but when writers rise to prominence. Or when they get published in our local market or language, or when we first notice them.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  02:54:50  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Nicely put, APL. Moorcock is certainly remembered as being part of the 1960s "New Wave," but Anthony and McCaffrey "rise" slightly after he does.
And Eddings is well after all of them, a few years after the Realms has first appeared in print in DRAGON (1979), but before Ed's first fantasy novel (1987) and the launch of the Realms as a game setting (1986) and the first Realms novel (Darkwalker on Moonshae by Doug Niles).
Seems like yesterday to me, but ancient history to many Realms fans, who (gulp) weren't even born then. (!)
love to all,
THO
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Kes_Alanadel
Learned Scribe

USA
326 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  03:03:56  Show Profile  Visit Kes_Alanadel's Homepage  Send Kes_Alanadel a Yahoo! Message Send Kes_Alanadel a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by A Publishing Lackey


McCaffrey born 1926, publishes short stories in the early 50s, but first novel is Restoree in 1967.




The first novel of hers I read, and still one of my favorites!

Ack! I seem to have too much blood in my coffee stream!

When did 'common sense' cease to be common?
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13103 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  05:59:05  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
What? No Kurt Vonnegut? I'd say Cat's Cradle was borderline Fantasy/Sci-Fi.

Come to think of it, that describes most of his stuff (the ending to Galapagos was just plain 'out there').

Also, no one mentioned one of my favorites - Stephen R. Donaldson and his Thomas Covenant novels (we had a little bit of dimensional sliding going on there).

And don't forget Jack Chalker - the gates in his Well of Souls novels could swallow an entire planet!

So much yet left to read, so little time... <sigh>

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 28 Feb 2009 06:00:30
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ErskineF
Learned Scribe

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  07:15:25  Show Profile  Visit ErskineF's Homepage Send ErskineF a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

From the English-language commercial fiction viewpoint (i.e. not including old folk tales, but novels written for sale, which starts us in Victorian times), we have the Victorians and Edwardians (Morris, Dunsany, Eddison)


Would you include M.R. James in that category? Not fantasy, strictly speaking, but very influential on the genre I would think.

--
Erskine Fincher
http://forgotten-realms.wandering-dwarf.com/index.php
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2949 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  07:55:23  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

What? No Kurt Vonnegut? I'd say Cat's Cradle was borderline Fantasy/Sci-Fi.

Come to think of it, that describes most of his stuff (the ending to Galapagos was just plain 'out there').

Also, no one mentioned one of my favorites - Stephen R. Donaldson and his Thomas Covenant novels (we had a little bit of dimensional sliding going on there).

And don't forget Jack Chalker - the gates in his Well of Souls novels could swallow an entire planet!

So much yet left to read, so little time... <sigh>




Donaldson should be mentioned, even if he starts in the mid-70's. As should Cherryh with her Morgaine books. These were also mentioned in the Dragon article in question. Tim Powers (another newer favourite) had some elements of the subject in his The Drawing of the Dark.

That leads me to anotehr question, this time more to The Hooded One. Did Ed ever use the alternative to Gates, of the dying or dreaming travelling through the dimensions/interplanetary worlds? The method is common in so much earlier fantasy (and even before that), but seems to have fallen somewhat out of use.

And just to clarify, I meant Michael John Harrison (b 1945, short stories from late 60's and novels from early 70's).

This subject makes me realise how dated I am in my fantasy/sci-fi reading. And how happy I am to continue being just that.

Edited by - Jorkens on 28 Feb 2009 10:18:43
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A Publishing Lackey
Seeker

74 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  15:32:40  Show Profile  Visit A Publishing Lackey's Homepage Send A Publishing Lackey a Private Message
Certainly we could name fantasy/sf authors for pages and pages of this thread, hijacking it thoroughly.
That's why I limited myself to those already mentioned. My point wasn't to catalogue all the worthies who should be mentioned (I'm sure Ed or THO or Jorkens or many other scribes could readily list a hundred or more, without much pause), it was to underscore what THO said about the fuzziness of pigeonholing authors as to "generations" or decades or "before and afters." Sorry about getting the wrong Harrison, there; I believe Ed is quite familiar with both (I've seen him talking to Harry at cons, and was in on an e-mail where he once suggested to a publisher that V-Nights and Pastel City were ripe for North American reprints).
And there's nothing at all wrong about being "dated" in one's reading. Except that it too often means favourite authors are too dead to ever pen sequels and new masterpieces for you to read.
I find the problem to the opposite: newbies who are unaware that derivative, shallow writers of the moment are copying or echoing better, older works, and champion the new writers as groundbreaking geniuses. It means they're missing so much great reading.
And James (again, I've seen Ed trotting around the dealer's aisles at Worldcon with a fat and very expensive complete stories of James under his arm, so I know HE knows James) is indeed, on the ghost story side, one of those older "root" authors (so is Cabell, for that matter).
Cabell, James, Hodgson, and Clark Ashton Smith and Lovecraft once again demonstrate the fuzziness of categorizing; they bridge over the "old classic" and the "pulp" labels (I'm well aware that fans of specific writers and views may disagree, placing a given author firmly in one or the other or a new category). As Ed once said (in a keynote speech at an ALA annual conference, talking to librarians about the inevitable classifying of books libraries do):

"Putting creative works into pigeonholes is an inaccurate, subjective process that at times ALMOST leads to more disputes than it proves useful. Almost. However, that's never a valid argument for not categorizing - - because categorizing is something humans DO. You can't stop it by banning it or refusing to do it. So you might as well do it well."

So saith Ed. Hey, someone who's not THO got to say that, in this thread! Whee! Move over, beautiful hooded lady . . . perhaps right over here, onto my lap . . .
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  15:46:25  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Purrr . . . why, APL, what a delightfully improper suggestion . . .
Let's discuss putting things into handy holes. And ending the molestation of pigeons, in that regard. Ahem.
And yes, I can confirm that Ed is familiar with the writings of M.R. James. By the way, DAUGHTER OF REGALS by Donaldson is one of his fantasy favourites. He loved Chalker's works, too, though he said talking to Jack was like "talking to a belching smokestack; I've never seen a man make a succession of lone cigarettes produce so much smoke!" and thought the Well World tales worked best when we were concentrating on Nathan Brazil or the lives of individuals down in the various hexes or worlds, and started to get away from Jack when we were doing the "wars raging across mutliple hexes." He LOVED the way Jack was able to make weird aliens (the Diviner and the Rell, for instance) seem vividly real. (Not since James Schmitz has someone done that quite so well for multiple alien species, Ed once said.)
However, I firmly agree with APL - - if we continue down this road, we can fill pages and pages of this thread, drifting farther away from the Realms as we go. I hope by now all scribes are familiar with the fact that Ed has 80,000-plus books at home, a good chunk of them one of the best READING (not collecting) fantastic English-language fiction private libraries in Canada, that he's familiar with a lot of writers and their works (from the famous unfinished story fragment he wrote with Roger Zelazny to the world he designed with Lynn Abbey to his early publishing of Rob Sawyer in a university literary magazine, and so on and on), and that if you can think of an "older" fantasy or sf writer, Ed has probably read them and has some of their books at home. Not to mention most of the newer ones; being a judge of the World Fantasy Awards or (as he's doing right now) judging the Sunbursts means you get box after box of current books arriving at your door - - literally HUNDREDS of books. And of course anyone who has seen Ed shopping at cons, as APL has, knows that Ed can't resist picking up more books whenever something catches his eye. He's currently rereading old John Dickson Carr locked-room murder mysteries for fun, as well as reviewing some new chick lit titles for his local library (and recommends folks check out the new Christopher Moore, FOOL, which is King Lear told from the viewpoint of, yes, the Fool/jester).
love to all,
THO
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5036 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  16:05:08  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi, Jorkens. I seem to remember an Ed fantasy short story from the 1970s that used dream-traveling (and I THINK he's using it in an instance at the beginning of his third Falconfar novel, FALCONFAR, but don't quote me on that), but I'll have to pass that query on to him for a proper reply.
I know he wrote at least one Kadath pastiche (HPL's Dreamlands: "For I have passed the Gates of Deeper Slumber" and so forth) back in the 1960s, just for fun, but I think he may have written more substantial fantasies in the 70s and 80s that employed dream travel.
We'll see, okay?
love,
THO
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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

USA
13103 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  17:02:17  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message
ED uses Elminster's door, doesn't he?

Seriously, it's humanly impossible to do everything he does in a 24 hour day, so I have to assume he's doing a little time-sliding of his own.

80,000?

Are you serious?.. and here I was proud of my (now) woefully inadequate collection.

Can Ed adopt me?

And if not... could you?

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2949 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  18:15:36  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by The Hooded One

Hi, Jorkens. I seem to remember an Ed fantasy short story from the 1970s that used dream-traveling (and I THINK he's using it in an instance at the beginning of his third Falconfar novel, FALCONFAR, but don't quote me on that), but I'll have to pass that query on to him for a proper reply.
I know he wrote at least one Kadath pastiche (HPL's Dreamlands: "For I have passed the Gates of Deeper Slumber" and so forth) back in the 1960s, just for fun, but I think he may have written more substantial fantasies in the 70s and 80s that employed dream travel.
We'll see, okay?
love,
THO



Thanks THO I await your return eagerly. And I will control myself although my whole system is screaming after continuing to talk about the different authors that jump into my head, both in connection with the Realms and otherwise.

Thanks again.
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Menelvagor
Senior Scribe

Israel
352 Posts

Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  20:49:57  Show Profile  Visit Menelvagor's Homepage Send Menelvagor a Private Message
I dont see why I should be left out in this part of lechers... but I think we should get (as much as possible in Ed's scroll) serious. So, I'll be evil ,and add some more questions, which have sprung up in my rather confused re-read of Ed's books (I'm alternating between Beyond the High Road, Death of The Dragon, Silverfall, and a few others) By week's end, I'm sure I'll have finished them all in proper order (which will probably spawn more questions...)
So, here goes:
Though these two have probably been asked, what was the percentage and amount of death in Cormyr in The Goblin War? (something like: "X Purple Dragons which is Y percent of them". Same for nobles, War WIzards, Harpers, civilians, orcs and goblins. no need for Obarskyrs)
Was there nobody else who could help Cormyr? I mean, I know it would detract from the whole 'Cormyte sacrifice for Cormyr' idea, but it does have allies?
In Elminster's Daughter, El takes Cala on some tour, showing her sights, after which she better understands El and Vangey. What did he show her?
El also says Vangey doesn't trust anyone since an event which killed dozens of nobles and War Wizards, and left vangey with a broken heart. WHat was this event, and why did his heart break? (if a beloved died, who was s/he?)
Myrmeen says she will have Vangey's heir for him. I've seen somewhere that the High Mage after Caladnei was a dude called Ganrahast. Is this Vangey's heir by Mreen? If so, can we have some info on him? And why was Cala High Magess for so short a time (most of them extended their lifespan)?

P. S. Lady THO, that was a request/invitation!

"Shall mortal man be more just than God? shall a man be more pure than his maker?
Behold, he put no trust in his servants; and his angels he charged with folly.
How much less them that dwell in houses of clay, whose foundation in the dust, are crushed before the moth?" - Eliphaz the Temanite, Job IV, 17-19.

"Yea, though he live a thousand years twice, yet hath he seen no good: do not all go to one place?" - Ecclesiastes VI, 6.

"There are no stupid questions – just a bunch of inquisitive idiots."

"Let's not call it 'hijacking'. Let's call it 'Thread Drift'."

Edited by - Menelvagor on 28 Feb 2009 20:51:34
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

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Posted - 28 Feb 2009 :  21:26:38  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message
Hi again, all!
Earlier this year, Broken Helm asked: "Dear Ed and THO, I have a campaign situation arising in the early 1360s. The PC party is traveling to Neverwinter for the first time, and they want to quiz a shopkeeper in Waterdeep they've befriended (whom I've already told them recently relocated from Neverwinter) about the city. I, of course, have to roleplay the NPC shopkeeper, and I know they're going to ask about some good/popular/relatively trustworthy/well-run local businesses. Can you give me a handful of such, that "everyone in Neverwinter" would have heard of, or know? Thanks in advance!"
Ed replies:


Sure, I'd love to. :}
Here are some more "good" trusted and well-known businesses in Neverwinter:

Jathran's Platter (butcher, three locations, sells cut, hung, smoked, and dressed meat, game, and fish; main downtown location also sells marinated meats, pickled spice fish in oilcloth carrysacks)

Korvraun's Armour (armour, shields, barding, and repairs to same, plus general "repairs" blacksmithing; also buys and sells used armor, oils and treats armour against rust, sells handmade nails)

The Nightwynd Cloak (shop that sells cloaks, masks, gowns, scents, baldric-pouches [the equivalent of "dress-up purses"] and "adornments" [cheap "feathers-and-buckles" jewelry that uses enameled metals, cut glass false gems, and painted, dyed, and sculpted wire and cloth rather than expensive components; the wares are all for women and men desiring to dress as women, and the shop also brews cups of spiced teas for customers, and has become something of a gathering-and-gossip place.

Pondur's (a general emporium of cheap used goods of literally sorts, from old wagon wheels to used beds to boxes of broken tools and ship "overcargoes" ["too much" of anything brought into port, which usually means salt-stained or bilge-soiled but otherwise perfectly good bolts of woven cloth]. Another place where folk meet each other often, as everyone drops by to scour the rooms full of junXXX er, stuff. Adventurers love it for the cheap materials they can use for disguises, traps, temporary outdoor sleeping shelters, etc.)

The Loraun Decanter (a shop that sells wines, liqueurs, flavored waters for bathing or sipping or cooking [add to sauces], ointments, oils, philtres [love potions that may or may not work, primarily herbal rather than magical], and elixirs (for which various wild claims are made but seldom believed; they are bought out of hope rather than certainty)



So saith Ed. Who is obviously jumping around among the questions to be answered piles again. Lovely loremaster that he is.
love to all,
THO
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