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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1229 Posts

Posted - 09 Aug 2008 :  15:07:53  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote  Delete Topic
The efficiently pragmatic way of the intercepting fist, a flashing bright sword swirling in a parry and riposte performed in one time, two daggers wielded with a combination of feline grace and shocking brutality, a circular dance of swordplay and knifework done amid shifting sands. The arts of war are as many, as varied and as fascinating as the less violent arts of painting, sculpture, poetry and music.

All human societies in the real world have evolved some form of martial art and in a fantasy world like the Forgotten Realms, that's likely to hold true for both humans and nonhumans. Whether that method of combat is as artistic and philosophical as T'ai Chi Chuan or as direct and pragmatic as Krav Maga makes no difference, it's still a martial art. And whether it's performed with bare hands or while clad in full plate harness and wielding a pollax is no kind of distinction between 'true' arts and 'base' fighting, all forms of fighting can be studied as a science and an art.

I understand that D&D rules are hardly going to make mechanical distinctions between a fencer who fights according to Agrippa's teachings in the Italian School, a diestro of La Verdadera Destreza or a French fencer of the late 17th century who uses his slightly lighter rapier in the style of the Transitional French School. Hell, a French Smallsword duellist of the 18th century or even a quasi-mythical Chinese xia specialising in the use of the jian might use the same game rules as these fencers. But that's not the point!

These styles look different, feel different and are roleplayed differently. To someone who plays RPGs for more than just door-smashing and loot-countin', it's vital to be able to describe and visualise the characters actions in a way that furthers the experience of roleplaying it. And a way that I've found invaluable towards that end is knowing how a character is trained to fight.

So, even knowing that many of these styles will have no game effect at all, I'm interested in knowing where in the Realms one can find similar martial traditions to many real world styles. Sometimes cultural similarities will suggest that similar fighting styles would be used, but sometimes, given that the Realms are not and never will be an analogue of our world, a style that in our world is confined to a given ethnic group or culture will be used by people in the Realms who bear no resemblence to either.

So, gentle scribes, sages and loremasters, who can enlighten me where the following real world styles would most likely be found in the Realms and what changes from the real world version one should expect:

Aikijutsu: Both the traditional forms going back to the unarmed grappling techniques of Japanese samurai and the more modern styles developed by Ueshiba Morihei and his students, including, of course, the largely non-combative aikido. This one, of course, is likely to be found on the Kara-Turan nations of Wa and/or Kozakura, but would it (or a style very like it) also be found somewhere else?

Archery: I've made the Dalesmen the best human archers, akin to Welsh longbowmen. I've also made gray orcs feared bowmen due to their focus on martial pursuits, single-minded training and great arm strength.

I'm not sure how to treat Cormyr (I've ruled that they do have some longbowmen, but not many enough to make them the mainstay of their army like historical England did at some points). Other lands use bows for hunting, but it takes a lifetime to train a proper longbowman and so, they're rarely found in other armies.

Armatura: The fighting style of Roman legionaries. Utilises a large shield, heavy armour and short swords. Javelins are used as missile weapons during the initial phase of the fight. Somehow, I got the impression that the Phalanx Fighting feat and disciplined formation of Zhentilar soldiers meant that they could use a style very like this one. I've also linked it to some Chondathan mercenaries in my campaign, given how effective this style is for formations of professional troops facing larger numbers of less disciplined enemies.

Armatura Equestris: The style of Roman cavalry , surviving well into the early Middle Ages and also among Byzantine horsemen. Spear thrust overhand, broadsword a secondary weapon, light shield used for mobile blocking and either bow or javelin as the missile weapon of choice (javelins were used among Western Empire troops, but bows were more eastern). I'm not sure where to place this in the Realms or even if this is a viable style for them. Perhaps the barbarians of the Ride use a variation of it or the horse raiders of the Tunlands.

Bando: This savage Burmese martial art emphasises power and brutality. It's known in our world as 'the jeep of martial arts', being reliable and without frills. Both ABA Bando (the popular modern form) and Kachin Bando (the ancestral style of the Jingpaw of the northern Burma hills) are subdivided into animal forms, style variants characterised by attributes from the animal after which they are named (and which describes the attributes of the fighter using it). Animals such as Bulls, Boars and Panthers are more common than the more peaceful or graceful animals. Kachin Bando is usually combined with Lethwei, a kickboxing style that's even less restrained than Muy Thai.

Placing Bando in Malatra is too easy, not to mention rather boring. In addition, I'm unlikely to use Kara-Tur overmuch in my campaign. I thought about having a society near Chult's Mistcliffs as the origin of the Bando styles, with both ABA Bando and Lethwei being practised on the Nelanther Isles after several slaving raids introduced the style to them. The style seems to me tailor-made for use in blood-soaked fighting pits where slaves to the Nelanther pirates are forced to fight each other as well as new captures. I'm pondering what I'd call the style.

Boxing: Practised in a wide variety of cultures, boxing just has to be popular somewhere in the Realms. The modern form of boxing, with finesse and skill as important as brute force, was known in Ancient Greece, although gloves weren't used and deaths in the ring were far from rare. During much of the Middle Ages, strength and toughness were sometimes seen as more admirable than finesse in the boxing ring and avoiding blows was seen as cowardly. The skillful techniques were never lost, though, even while they weren't as popular as bashing the other guy to bits. I have to admit that beyond postulating that boxing is known throughout the Heartlands, I have no idea where it's most popular or where the best fighters go to find fame and fortune.

Capoeira: The martial dance form of Brazil is the subject for much fanciful speculation. Whether or not the most bizarre techniques taught actually work in a real fight, I'll not deny that it does look beautiful. I don't know where in the Realms I'd place it, beyond speculating that the Chultan peninsula looks promising (Lapayila? Sammach?), or perhaps go for any place that has seen Sharrans kept as slaves (the Shoon Imperium?).

Chin Na Kung Fu: The aspect of Chinese kung fu concerned with manipulating joints, locking limbs and targeting vital points. Somewhere in Shou Lung seems obvious, but somewhere else?

Dagger Fighting: A generic term for the Medieval and Renaissance fighting style using one or two double-edged daggers for self-defence. Often associated with thugs and criminals, but historically practised by some soldiers as a secondary style as well as normal citizens for protection. I suspect that nearly every culture in the Realms has its own version of knife-fighting.

Escrima: A style incorporating both armed and unarmed techniques, it originates in our world from the Phillipines and is linked in martial art legend, at least, with natives coming into contact with European fencing.

Cheekily, I've made it the native style of the Sea of Fallen Stars Pirate Isles. There, it is known variously as 'Crimson Wavecraft' or 'Unfallen Bladework'. It's perfect for use with daggers and cutlasses, and there's nothing in there which demands that it be linked to any specific culture. In any event, since the Pirate Isles raid Thay, Old Empires and the Heartlands equally (not to mention Thesk, Telflamm and Kara-Turan influence from there), it becomes possible to justify nearly anything as an affectation from 'elsewhere'. Plus, I like escrimador pirates.

Italian School Fencing: This style uses a rapier as the primary weapon and either a dagger, buckler, a cloak or even a second rapier in the off-hand. It's based primarily off the writings of Agrippa, Capo Ferro and Thibault. The rapier is very much an offensive weapon in this style, rarely used for parries (which are left to the off hand or the stylist may trust to killing his foe first or dodging his blows). This is rapier fencing as it was during most of the weapon's history, although Hollywood usually shows us French Smallsword stylists jumping around and calls it rapier fencing.

In my campaign, I've made this the primary fencing style. Independent (and furiously competing) schools teaching variations exist in Chondath (all cities), Sembia and even Amn (there competing furiously with the rival schools of Transitional Rapier and La Verdadera Destreza). The style is known as 'Chondathan School' to most practisioners, even in other countries, with the exception of Amnians, who call it 'Anthkatla School Fencing'.

La Verdadera Destreza: In our world, a curious mix of duelling style rapier fencing and mathematics and natural philosophy. The diestro (a stylist) disdained vulgar motion and rage, basing his stances and movements on geometric principles aimed to maximise efficiency.

In my campaign, popular around the Lake of Steam and also practised by Amnians. It was probably originally developed in Lapaliiya. It's called 'The True Art', oftentimes with an implied sneer at wizards, especially if the speaker hails from Lapaliiya.

Transitional French School: Utilising a shorter and lighter blade than the Italian School, this fencing style teaches the sword alone as the primary weapon for both offense and defence. It's much closer to the furious swordfights we're used to seeing rapier fencers doing in Hollywood movies.

Since the Realms haven't undergone the same technological changes as our world had done when this style became popular, I've chosen to locate it in Waterdeep and have it be a primarily civilian style. A transitional era rapier has no place on a battlefield with armoured foes, but it's just the thing for a noble's revel or an affair of honour. In the Realms, of course, this style is simply known as 'Waterhavian Fencing' or perhaps 'Transitional Dessarin Fencing' to the snobbish sages who concern themselves with hoplology as it's happening.

French Smallsword: Now we are come to the sort of flashy combat we see unarmoured rogues and pirates getting into in Captain Blood and newer movies. Utterly out of place in any military context where armour might be encountered, of course. Fast, furious and emphasising the riposte in one-time as its signature tactic.

I've put this style in Iriebor, seeing as the noble families of that city engage in constant fighting of a civilian nature. There, it is known as 'Ireabor style' and derided by nearly anyone else as impractical (unless they've fought one of the deadly masters of the smallsword, of course). I've also made a similar Sembian style in my campaign that uses a light saber and is often used by sailors (and pirates), called 'Sembian Sabreplay'. It is even more acrobatic than the Irieabor smallsword style and utilises an equal number of slashes and thrusts.

Furusiya: The combat horsemanship of the Muslim warriors in our world. Horse archery, the spear used in both hands and the sword as a secondary weapon. I've postulated two main branches of this style, both coming originally from Zakhara before being filtered through the local fighting styles of the indigenious peoples. One is the Calimshan (Shoonach) version and the other is the Murgh˘m tradition, which is heavily modified by contact with the Hordelands Tuigan and other steppe people.

Hapkido: A relatively recent Korean style combining aikijutsu, judo and native Korean striking arts. It looks very nice, so I'd like to include it somewhere in the Realms, but I haven't decided where and under what name.

Hoplomachia: The fighting style of the Ancient Greek city states. I can hardly avoid placing this in Chessenta and noting that the people of Akanax, the City of Soldiers, are known as the best practisioners of it.

Hsing I Chuan: An internal Taoist art that's nevertheless very direct in application and stresses striking techniques. So far, I've no plans to include it anywhere but in Shou Lung and environments.

Hung Gar Kung Fun (Tiger Crane Style): A strong, hard style which stresses staying in place and countering attacks with hard blocks and counterstrikes. So far, no plans for it, beyond noting that the philosophy wouldn't be out of place for dwarves. In my campaign, I made my own dwarven styles, of course, but I drew inspiration from this style, among others.

Hwa Rang Do: This mystical Korean art claims great antiquity and awesome magical powers. With its many and beatiful weapon forms, extensive philosophical component and healing arts; it wouldn't be out of place as an elven martial art. Just a thought, though.

Jeet Kune Do: Bruce Lee's famously utilitarian fighting style, not so much a style as a method of thought and fighting. What works is good, expect to get hurt when you fight but try to hurt the opponent worse and don't try to do things that are too hard. Lee called this scientific streetfighting and it certainly lives up to the name.

I don't know whether I should use this in the Realms or not. I have a tentative idea about using this as the training regimen for students of a Zhentil Keep assassin who specialised in taking down wizards. Usually or always combined with armed styles, of course.

Judo: Familiar to everyone, though sometimes presented by Hollywood as a mystical fighting art when it's really a sportive style. I'm not sure what to do with it, beyond noting at its likely Kara-Turan origin.

Jujutsu: Many styles carry this name, from Japanese styles for disarmed samurai (aikijutsu is properly defined as a subcategory of jujutsu) which are as pragmatic and brutal as Western versions of the same to almost purely sportive versions. Popular modern styles include Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and a style remarkable in fictional circles for being the style used by Sherlock Holmes (albeit misspelled in Doyle's story) is Bartitsu. I need ideas for where in the Realms I can put BJJ and Bartitsu, not to mention jujutsu (beyond Kozakura and Wa, of course).

Kajunkenbo: A fusion martial art developed for survival in a rough neighbourhood and during bar fights. This style reminded me irresitably of Skullport and I decided to sneak it in there as 'Shadowport Weaponless'. Often combined with Dagger Fighting, of course.

Kalaripayit: The traditional martial art of Kerala, India. Both armed and unarmed and includes a body of magical knowledge that in the Realms might well work. Linked in folklore to rakhashas and other such spirit-creatures, which might mean that it's found whereever rakhashas are. Which puts it where in the Realms?

Karate: All forms originally come from Kara-Tur somewhere, I guess. Probably widely known and taught in many places with any contact with them at all. Any scribes want to examine the issue (I'll confess to a bias against karate )?

Kempo: A Japanese art with orgins in China. Sounds tailor-made for cultural melting pots like Thesk.

Kenjutsu: Samurai swordfighting, originally from Kozakora and Wa in the Realms.

Early Medieval Mounted Combat: Until about 1100 in our world, knights weren't all that far from late Roman cavalry (apart from stirrups, of course, although the saddles of the time stil limited a knightly charge). They still used the spear overhand, not the lance, although couched spear techniques data from this era. The broadsword was a status symbol as well as a sidearm and the shield was the primary defence. These knights were mailed, not plate-armoured.

When my PCs encounter orcish or goblinoid cavalry, this is often the style in which they fight. I'm not sure whether any human kingdoms fight in this style.

High Medieval Mounted Combat: The stereotypical knight of fiction, with lance, sword and shield. Less emphasis on foot techniques than earlier knightly styles and the lance became a primary attack. The arming sword was the primary sidearm, as before, but axes, maces, hammers and picks also came to the fore to deal with the heavier armour of the period.

The majority of human knights fight in this manner in my Realms, with Cormyr's cavalry being particularly known for it.

Late Medieval Mounted Combat: With the increasing prevailance of plate harness, knights abandoned shields altogether for heavier swords and polearms. Pollaxes and greatswords were used when dismounted (often, given the danger of pikes, shot and massed archers), with the lance still being used in the rare cavalry charge. Unarmed grappling techniques were sophisticated and widespread, with speed and mobility, even in heavy armour, being one of the hallmarks of this style.

I've postulated this style as a new development, often used by paladins of Helm and/or the nobles of Cormyr and Impiltur. In all cases, it's popular because the finest plate harnesses render shields less necessary.

Kobajutsu: Armed techniques from Okinawa. I'm inclined to restrict them to Kara-Tur or fighters trained there. Maybe I'm being unfair, but ninja fanbois with nunchakus irritate me.

Kuntao: This Indonesian/Malaysian style, however, I'm quite happy with including. I'm wrestling with where to put it, which will probably end up being the same place as Pentjak Silat.

Kusarijutsu: Aside from the cultural context, this style will serve for nearly any form that uses a chain-like weapon (such as the spiked chain). Any FR-lore welcome.

Kyujutsu: Japanese horse archery. It, along with its more mystical yabusame and kyudo cousins, would probably be confied to Kara-Tur. The flavour is wrong for the Ride and/or Hordelands.

Longsword Fighting: FechtbŘcher such as Talhoffer's, Meyer's and Goliath's form the modern understanding of Longsword Fighting, fencing with hand-and-a-half swords. Much more fluid and mobile than popularly depicted, it was truly a sight to behold. Also known for combining unarmed techniques brilliantly with its armed methods.

I've postulated that Longsword Fighting is popular in Cormyr, Impiltur, Sespech and some parts of the Heartlands. I've not decided where it comes from nor how the style differs in these countries.

Masters of Defence Training: This intergrated combat style aimed to train men in all popular weapons they might encounter as civilians or military men. It's the style practised by men such as George Silver. It's contrasted with the 'foreign' influence of the rapier as a weapon in England of our world. A Master of Defence was a commoner, not a gentle-born man as many fencing instructors, and this led to much friction.

I'm afraid I shamelessly dropped them into Cormyr on one hand and Impiltur on the other, seeing them as traditionalists based around the weapons used by the army (broader blade swords, polearms, etc.) rather than the narrow civilian swords that are popular among many nobles. The rivalry was too good to pass up.

Military Hand-to-Hand: Various types of no-nonsense forms of fighting meant to be taught fast to many recruits. Krav Maga epitomises the wilder legends about the efficiency of this form of fighting and either the Modern Army Combatives (MAC) or Marine Corps' Martial Arts Progam (MCMAP) may be the one familar to most scribes.

I imagine the Zazesspur School of Stealth and many other organisations would teach a style that didn't look too different from Fairbairn Close Combat Training or 'Silent Killing'. I also imagine that Rashemmi wrestling traditions have formed something like Sambo wrestling by now, especially given their near-constant warfare. Any culture with robust wrestling traditions and a need for a pragmatic martial art for self-defence could come up with something looking like Krav Maga. Any scribes have ideas?

Muy Thai: Thai kickboxing, now an 'in' style in martial art circles. Given that I've already put Lethwei (very similar) in Chult or nearby, I might reserve this one for Malatra.

Naginatajutsu: I'll put this polearm style in Kara-Tur. Ogre magi, however, often use it, no matter where they come from and some ogres have learnt it from them (I imagine the Shieldbreaker ogres use a variant).

Glaive (or Swiss Halberd) Fighting: The use of a polearm as an individual weapon. Pragmatic, incorporates unarmed techniques for close-in fighting and staff grips for defence.

Using the bill instead of a glaive, I imagine Cormyr's militias often use this style. Other than that, I haven't really thought much about it.

Pa Kua Chuan: An internal Taoist style almost as artistic as T'ai Chi Chuan. Haven't thought about where to find it in the Realms.

Pak Hok (White Crane) Kung Fu: Beyond noting that it's cool, I haven't thought about where this one might have spread, from its probably origins in Shou Lung.

Pankration: All-in fighting from Ancient Greece. Eye-gouging was among the few things that were regarded as dishonourable (and this was an Olympic Sport!).

I have to put this one in Chessenta, while noting that mercenaries from there could have spread it literally anywhere in the Heartlands.

Pentjak Silat: Silat styles today are mostly seen as stickfighting/grappling styles, but it's a very complete martial art. The kris (knife/sword) was often seen as a magical focus for the casting of spells, so it's a natural transplant to fantasy worlds.

Of course, Malatra or a similar jungle culture would be the easy plate to put it in (and it may indeed by practised there). But in my campaign, I'm ruling that the natives of the Nelanther Islands had a similar styles and the various pirates (goblins, orcs and humans alike) have picked it up as a devastingly effective combat style.

Pollaxe Fighting: Historically used for knightly judicial duels, this was a fighting style meant for heavy armour and a weapon that could penetrate it.

Given Sespech's traditional fondness for two-handed weapons, I'm considering having this be a native style from there, now spread to other Inner Sea lands.

Praying Mantis Kung Fu: There are actually two forms, Northern and Southern, and beyond sharing a name they're not connected in either style or history. I haven't thought about where to put this in the Realms.

Quarterstaff Fighting: Yes, the past-time of Robin Hood and his Merry Men. Devastingly effective and yet not restricted to those with the money to buy weapons and armour (as many styles tend to be), this is the ultimate style for common people who need to defend themselves. As such, it's a natural for the Dalelands and much of the North.

Savate: French kickboxing, connected in our world with cutlasses, shady docks and hard men. Yes, I thought of Marsember as well.

In my campaign, I'm calling this 'Dockfighting' and it's popular not only in Marsember, but also in the dockside dives of Starmantle, Westgate, Teziir and various Sembian ports.

Shaolin Kung Fu: Apart from its obvious Kara-Turan lineage, it might be the style practised by the monks of the Monastery of the Yellow Rose. Although I'd really prefer a different and more distinct style for those priests, the description of Kane's fighting rings true for either Shaolin or the cinema-friendly Wushu (which, to my knowledge, has no self-defence applications beyond looking good).

Shortsword Fighting: Medieval/Renaissance style using the shortsword as both a thrusting and slashing weapon, relying on fast footwork and lighting parries to avoid harm. Often a back-up style for soldiers with heavier weapons.

In my campaign, popular throughout the Heartlands and the Moonsea. Seen as a 'commoner's' style when contrasted with fencing.

Sojutsu: Japanese spearfighting. While Japanese in character, any style which used a spear in both hands could look somewhat similar. Other styles include many beautiful forms of Chinese Kung Fu (as seen in Hero and other movies), where the object is often as much to look good as kill the enemy (with spears decorated with colourful tassels), Viking Spear Fighting, where a shield is used in the off-hand and the Iklawa fighting of the Zulu.

I've made the militia style of many Dales resemble Viking Spearfighting, with the shield used for defence and the spears jabbing out of a shield wall. Thrown spears are not the Dalelands way, though, since throwing the primary weapon just leads to one being unarmed when the next orc attacks.

Iklawa Fighting is used by Wemics of the Shaaran plains, as well as tribes of humans that desire to emulate them.

Sumo: Should Sumo in the Realms be confined to Wa/Kozakura or should there be a variant in the Western Realms?

Sword and Buckler Play: Fast, emphasising cuts, shield bashes and grappling with both weapons and unarmed. Popular until the 16th century. Not formation based, unlike Sword and Shield style.

I've not thought about this style, other than the fact that it's probably used all over the North and the Heartlands.

Sword and Shield Fighting: Familar to SCA members, sword and board is a distinctly military style and is primarily used by infantry troops. Unlike Sword and Buckler Play, close combat was avoided, since the larger shield impeded action in the grapple.

Popular nearly anywhere in the Heartlands and North, I'd guess. I haven't thought about where it's 'iconic' or where the most development is taking place.

Tae Kwon Do: Haven't thought about it.

T'ai Chi Chuan: Another I'm undecided on. Perhaps monks of Ilmater, if I decide to make this one non-Eastern?

Taijutsu: Ninja-style. The less said, the better. Kara-Tur and some Nine Golden Swords members, I'd guess.

Wing Chun: An interesting style, formed much of the core of Jeet Kun Do. Direct, striking style with a focus on close-combat. Brutal standing grapples. Two weapons, butterfly swords and the staff, used more like a sword than the quarterstaff grip. Characterstic stance is backward-leaning, feet side-by-side.

I want to include this style somewhere it'll see wide use, but I'm not sure where. There's no reason it has to be Asian, even though it is in our world. It's not very mystical or spiritual in nature at all, so it could fit pragmatic warrior better than monks of some sort.

Wrestling: There's hardly a culture without its own wrestling tradition.

Greco-Roman one puts in Chessenta, given how much wrestling is reputed to be used there. I've also put a form of Indian Wrestling (endurance based, huge wrestlers that exercise constantly for greater muscle mass, spiritual connections) in Turmish, saying it's mixed with Untheric and Chessentan forms and given its own spiritual spin by the Turmish.

Combat Wrestling, of the pragmatic sort used by disarmed fighers, are present almost everywhere.

Wushu: Being the 'show' version of kung fu, this fits well for cinematic heroes from anywhere. Nearly every single move too flamboyant to be used in real fights is featured prominently in Wushu, including flying kicks, spinning kicks, split kicks, etc.

Any thoughts, scribes? Where would you place those I'm unsure about? What do you think of the placements I've already made? What styles am I missing?

Well-read scribes will recognise this list as being from SJ Games excellent GURPS Martial Arts book. I heartily recommend this well researched and interesting tome for anyone fond of fighting, regardless of his chosen ruleset. The real world research alone is worth the price.

Za uspiekh nashevo beznadiozhnovo diela!

Forgotten Realms fans, please sign a petition to re-release the FR Interactive Atlas

Edited by - Icelander on 09 Aug 2008 15:25:23

Daviot
Senior Scribe

USA
367 Posts

Posted - 09 Aug 2008 :  23:22:18  Show Profile  Visit Daviot's Homepage  Send Daviot an AOL message Send Daviot a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Bravo!

A lot of what's here is pretty accurate to my thoughts. I've more or less described thugs using fusion martial arts, kickboxing sailors, Theskan shadowmaster thugs using kempo, Rakshasas using Val sabers, and so forth.

That said, a few additions from my train of thought:

Dwarves: I've always seen dwarves as a mix of late-medieval arms and the phalanx wall. Lots of interesting (and deadly) polearms, with lots of crushing and splitting anti-armor weapons (warhammers, maces, etc.) with a surprising amount of longsword (bastard sword for the D&D parlance).

Luskan: A mix of knife-fighting and dueling. I see German-style Academic fencing, a.k.a. Mensur as the sport of the town, with high-ranking pirates sporting their scars.

Schwingen/Glima/folk wrestling: My mind places this and similar "folk wrestling" generically in "The Savage North". Could be used to settle differences between Uthgardt tribesmen without drawing blood.

Kurash/jacket wrestling: My mind is drawn to the clothing of the Golden Water region in SE Faerűn, with it possibly having spread to Murgh˘m and Semphar.

Lantan: I see stick-fighting martial arts as the vogue, popular, "gentlemanly" style of choice in the land of Gond.

The Shaar/Raumathar: A fusion of the light cavalry techniques used by Parthia, Scythia, and the Comanche. Based on Ed's lore, I imagine that the Raumathari horsemen used similar techniques, combined with dragoon-style heavy infantry.

One usually has far more to fear from the soft-spoken wizard with a blade and well-worn boots than from the boisterous one in the ivory tower.
Want more adventure? Into the Dark (PF Beginner Box 2nd level) | The Red Leaves Enigma (3.x/PF 3rd/4th level) | In Iron Clad (3.x/PF 14th lvl)
My Tabletop Writing CV.

Edited by - Daviot on 09 Aug 2008 23:23:47
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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1229 Posts

Posted - 10 Aug 2008 :  00:17:41  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

Dwarves: I've always seen dwarves as a mix of late-medieval arms and the phalanx wall. Lots of interesting (and deadly) polearms, with lots of crushing and splitting anti-armor weapons (warhammers, maces, etc.) with a surprising amount of longsword (bastard sword for the D&D parlance).

Well, to me the shield is really the iconic dwarven weapon, so I've postulated two-handed weapons as the exception, not the rule.

I've actually created a number of dwarven fighting styles, ranging from the wild fighting of 'Corlthann' (Battlerager Rasslin') to the utilitarian 'Ilith Makaz' (The Other Side of the Tools) and even the mystical 'Xoth Kuld Olara' (The Spirit of the Axe). Of those, only 'Samman Auraukuld' (Brother Greataxe) is a two-handed weapon style and that's taught to gold dwarf shock troops who have already mastered 'Mrinding Clangeddin' (Clangeddin's Path), the gold dwarf military style.

I just see dwarves as being so conservative and careful to husband their declining numbers over the years that they've emphasised strong defence lines over anything else. Of course, many of the styles offer two-handed training as an option, for example with the dwarven waraxe, but few dispense entirely with shields. Even my dwarven sport wrestling styles often incorporate the shield.

quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

Luskan: A mix of knife-fighting and dueling. I see German-style Academic fencing, a.k.a. Mensur as the sport of the town, with high-ranking pirates sporting their scars.

I like that. Consider it stolen. Mensurschlńger or cutlass fencing in Luskan, contrasted nicely with the more lethal thrusting duels engaged in elsewhere. Since it's unlikely to kill in one blow, I see it being almost as common as bar fights.

And Luskan Dagger Fighting would be especially developed, of course.

quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

Schwingen/Glima/folk wrestling: My mind places this and similar "folk wrestling" generically in "The Savage North". Could be used to settle differences between Uthgardt tribesmen without drawing blood.

Very well. I'm not sure that avoiding drawing blood is high up on the list of Uthgardt tribesmen's priorities, but in Icelandic sagas, it certainly wasn't unknown for a wrestling match to feature a little brawling or even degenerate into an axe fight.

quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

Kurash/jacket wrestling: My mind is drawn to the clothing of the Golden Water region in SE Faerűn, with it possibly having spread to Murgh˘m and Semphar.

Sounds fair enough.

quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

Lantan: I see stick-fighting martial arts as the vogue, popular, "gentlemanly" style of choice in the land of Gond.

But what kind of stickfighting?

A sport form of Tapak Sutji Pentjak Silat, using the seku exclusively? Banshay with the dhot? Krabi Krabong mae sunsawk techniques? African stickfighting? La Canne de Combat? German dusack style? Victorian Singlestick? Shillelagh Fighting? Egyptian stickfighting (I've given Red Wizards of Thay a variant of this, with wands used as sticks)? Gatka?

quote:
Originally posted by Daviot

The Shaar/Raumathar: A fusion of the light cavalry techniques used by Parthia, Scythia, and the Comanche. Based on Ed's lore, I imagine that the Raumathari horsemen used similar techniques, combined with dragoon-style heavy infantry.


That sounds fair. Realistically, the cavalry armies of Murgh˘m are likely to resemble Scythians, but I found it more fun to have them fight Furusyia style.

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Icelander
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Posted - 10 Aug 2008 :  05:00:49  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, this takes care of fitting real world styles into the Realms. How about native styles? Ones that either have no real world equivalent or are changed enough to merit their own writeup?

These are the styles I can remember that I'll have to account for in my Realms. Further suggestions welcome or lore quibbles. And yes, I know that I really need to flesh those out better.

Berduskan or Silverymoon fencing: This style is often linked to Harpers in the popular imagination, although it is by no means necessary to be a member of that organisation to gain training in it. The weapon used is a long cut-and-thrust sword that's light enough to use in a fencing grip, but heavy enough for battlefield use, and the style merges elven and human influences. Use of a shield is rare, but a parrying dagger is occasionally used. There are two traditions of this style in the Realms, but beyond a superficial similarity in techniques, there is no reason to suspect a connection beyond the fact that both blend elven and human fighting methods. The Berduskan tradition usually teaches a longer sword, averaging 3 1/2 feet in blade length, with a human style rapier-guard, while the Silverymoon style often teaches the use of a more elven blade, just over 3 feet in length and with a grip that can accomodate elven hands more easily.

Bladesinging: In elvish, 'Megilhiniue' or "Hinue'Kerym" (which I'll confess a partiality towards). This quintessential elven style would have to be included in any writeup, of course. I was thinking about having there be a subtle difference between the Aryvandaaran tradition, today melded with surviving Illefarn/Keltomir/etc. traditions and evolved into a style associated with Evermeet and the Cormanthyr tradtion. I also believe there would be a seperate Evereska tradition. Most of them would be close to each other, with the possible exception of pure Aryvandaaran Hinue'Kerym. Then, of course, there is Nael'kerym.

Maen'Baugluth: 'The Way of Power Restrained' is a common martial art among The People. It incorporates acrobatic kicks and advanced grapples and throws, in addition to training in the sword and staff. Apart from the lack of the jutte among its weapons, it looks exactly like our world Hapkido.

Maen en Amad'Aredhel: 'The Way of Flowering Elfhood' [last word literally means 'Honourable Elf') is an elven martial art that looks much like Hwa Rang Do of our world, although the bow is emphasised more and the sang-jyel-bong is absent. It teaches healing techniques as well as combative ones, moral philosophy as well as tactics. All students must master the five rules and the nine virtues.

Nelanther Silat: While it seems that every pirate crew on the Nelanther Islands has their own form of Silat, one of the most popular forms resembles Tapak Sutji Pentjak Silat, without the katana training and with more focus on the cutlass as primary. The style also incorporates fighting in the rigging and on an unsteady deck as a platform. A style similar to Kumango Silat is also a favourite knife-fighting method among the pirates, with a healthy dose of Luskan Knife-Fighting mixed in (with the most deadly fighters mastering both styles).

Velar'Faen: 'The Defence of Life' is as much a meditation technique as it is a martial art. It resembles our world's Aikido, with elements of T'ai chi ch'uan, principally the use of slow katas for solo exercise and meditation. Many elves learn it to keep fit and limber during long periods of sedentary work. Serious stylists can use it for self-defence with good effect, however. It's often studied by priestesses of Angharradh, Hanali Celandil or Sehanine Moonbow; although the art is by no means confined to clergy or females. It emphasises the mental connection elves feel toward each other and the Weave in all things and teaches healing and fighting even-handedly.

In addition, I need more native styles for the Moonsea area. I don't think I have any and that's no good. Coming up with distinct knife-fighting styles for Westgate and Luskan would also be cool. I'm pretty sure that two knives or a knife and cutlass are more popular in Westgate and that Luskan is likely to teach knife and open hand techniques. Even that, though, is subject to individual stylists preferences.

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Zanan
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Posted - 11 Aug 2008 :  09:17:48  Show Profile  Visit Zanan's Homepage Send Zanan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
On a sidenote ... I would always add the line: "most common in" / "developed by" in such a list. It always makes me cringe when e.g. watching Star Trek and they speak of Romulan brandy (as if they only have one in the entire empire!), vintage from Proxima-Centauri, flowers from Tau Zeti Alpha and the like. We speak of large regions, many cultures and long stretches of time - in either case.

I wouldn't go all-too exotic, at least with the names. You see, one of the major issues people had with the Realms was the unhealthy collection of Earth cultures placed into a primarily Western European medieval high fantasy realm.

In essence, much like Sean K. Reynolds did with the Drow Fighting Styles, much of what has been listed above can be broken down to special feat / class / ability combinations.

Neither of which should stop you using certain fighting styles / form for certain reasons, of course.

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Markustay
Realms Explorer extraordinaire

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Posted - 11 Aug 2008 :  21:17:22  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Positively SUPERB!

As a martial arts enthusiast, I find this delightful, insightful, and very helpful.

Although I agree with most of what Zanan had to say, I myself often draw parallels to RW cultures, just to give people an idea of where I'm coming from when trying to get an idea across - so there's nothing wrong with making the comparisons (just use alternate names).

As for Cormyr - I try to avoid the "Merry Olde England' of Arthurian Legend as a comparison, if only because it is tossed around way too much. I've likened mine to be more like Conan's Aquilonia (which works even better in 4e); that means I have my version of "Gunderland Pikeman" living in the regions bordering Sembia, and "Bossonian Archers" type troops from the areas bordering the Stormhorns - effective agianst barabarinas (Tunlands), Orcs, and Goblinoids.

So, for me, I have Cormyrian Longbowmen living in the north in the border region, and considering that that area blends into the Dales somewhat, it makes sense that some of the Dales training and tactics have seeped into the tactics of border garrisons - especially amongst the militia (and nearly all Cormyrian towns have well-trained militia). So decent bowmen may not be available in the typical Purple Dragon Patrol (who would more likely use Crossbows), but you could definately find the 'Ranger Types' amongst the Scouts and Stoneland Patrols, and also in times of war when the local populace is conscripted.

I also see Bando being developed by some Shaaran tribes - the ones that don't rely on cavalry, perhaps in areas around some of the small forests in the Shaar (where cavalry wouldn't work).

I haven't gone through your entire (MOST impressive) list, so as I pick it apart, I will offer more commentary.

Thanks for sharing this - Mark

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone

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Icelander
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Posted - 11 Aug 2008 :  21:51:13  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Zanan

On a sidenote ... I would always add the line: "most common in" / "developed by" in such a list. It always makes me cringe when e.g. watching Star Trek and they speak of Romulan brandy (as if they only have one in the entire empire!), vintage from Proxima-Centauri, flowers from Tau Zeti Alpha and the like. We speak of large regions, many cultures and long stretches of time - in either case.

Oh, absolutely. Travel in the Realms appears much more common than travel in historical times and it wouldn't at all be out of place for a Waterhavian to have mastered Chondathan School Fencing or for a Vast native to fight in the style of Waterhavian Fencing. Nor, indeed, is any style so popular anywhere that there are no competing styles. Alongside the civilian fencing arts are military styles that are both more pragmatic and utilise broader-bladed swords.

So, for example, the typical scion of a Cormyrean noble house might have learned Chondathan fencing for duels and/or sparring sessions, High Medieval Knightly Combat (probably just called Knight's Training) for his military service and at his father's insistence he might also be taking lessons from a respected Master of Defence who used to be a Swordcaptain in the Purple Dragons.

quote:
Originally posted by Zanan

I wouldn't go all-too exotic, at least with the names. You see, one of the major issues people had with the Realms was the unhealthy collection of Earth cultures placed into a primarily Western European medieval high fantasy realm.

Well, I'd rather have exotic and unfamiliar names than put real world names into the Realms, in most cases. And I like the cultural diversity of the Realms.

For example, Bando and Silat might be 'exotic' enough for most people for the names not to jar when heard in the Realms, but having 'karate' and 'tae kwon do' be taught in Waterdeep might be a little off-putting. Having elves teaching 'The Way of Restrained Power', however, feels pretty cool to me.

quote:
Originally posted by Zanan

In essence, much like Sean K. Reynolds did with the Drow Fighting Styles, much of what has been listed above can be broken down to special feat / class / ability combinations.

Well, given that I don't play D&D, I'll leave that to another scribe.

I play in the Realms using GURPS rules, which allows me to create characters and races precisely how I imagine them when I read the lore and not be shackled to a rule system that I frankly find simplistic in its core mechanics and unnecessarily cluttered with the profusion of splatbooks.

quote:
Originally posted by Zanan

Neither of which should stop you using certain fighting styles / form for certain reasons, of course.


Well, player characters are generally exceptional or at least extraordinary, so I assume that they could eventually learn nearly any style. The exceptions would be some of the more secretive styles of certain races, not shared with humans (i.e. bladesinging, for example).

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Icelander
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Posted - 11 Aug 2008 :  22:28:50  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Positively SUPERB!

As a martial arts enthusiast, I find this delightful, insightful, and very helpful.

Well, my thanks, gentle scribe. Transcribed for the glory of Tempus, the Lord of War, and reverently passed into the eternal keeping of Deneir, The Scribe of Oghma.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Although I agree with most of what Zanan had to say, I myself often draw parallels to RW cultures, just to give people an idea of where I'm coming from when trying to get an idea across - so there's nothing wrong with making the comparisons (just use alternate names).

Indeed. Without comparisons we wouldn't have much to go on, as we can hardly view the Realms for ourselves. And as for alternate names, I'm looking. Those names in English, though, can often be retained 'as is', as I imagine the Realms might well call Longsword Fighting, Dagger Fighting, et al, the same as we do. A number of regional names and affectations wouldn't be out of place, though.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

As for Cormyr - I try to avoid the "Merry Olde England' of Arthurian Legend as a comparison, if only because it is tossed around way too much. I've likened mine to be more like Conan's Aquilonia (which works even better in 4e); that means I have my version of "Gunderland Pikeman" living in the regions bordering Sembia, and "Bossonian Archers" type troops from the areas bordering the Stormhorns - effective agianst barabarinas (Tunlands), Orcs, and Goblinoids.

I must confess a particular affection for the Merry Old England of myth and for all other aspects of Great Britain, as a matter of fact. As such, my Cormyr might occasionally seek inspiration from it, perhaps overmuch for Realms purists. For example, my Purple Dragons, whether on patrol, watch duty or garrison service, have an inordinate fondness for a strong, barely drinkable concoction that they term 'tea', 'brew', 'chai' or other, unprintable terms. I know it's an unforgivable sin, but it happened without conscious thought.

Due to this love of all things British, the foothills and hidden vallyes of the Storm Horn Mountains and the Thunder Peaks also serve as home for the remains of Talfiric tribes from the Chionthar valley. These have mixed with Damaran/Chondathan Cormytes and the Dalesfolk to form their own ethnic group with its own language and customs. Unlike the humans that became Cormyreans, they had good relations with the dwarves that once lived in the mountains and adopted some of their patterns of speech and hard-drinking ways.

In recent times, they composed a significant fraction of the old kingdom of Esparin, but were driven back into their mountains when that kingdom was annexed by Cormyr. Not an overly large group, mind you, but certainly distinctive. What are they called, ye ask? Why, by the Cormytes of the lower lands, they're known as Highlanders.

But my Cormyr is still far from being an analogue of England, despite a few similarities.

In my defence, there's a cavalry commander in the service of Darkhold called Angus who hates Purple Dragons and King Azoun. He appears to come from the hills around the Storm Horns or the Tunlands. There are also plenty of NPCs in official lore that have vaguely (or overtly) Celtic names without an apparent connection with the Moonshaes. By the Earthmother, they had to come from somewhere!

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

So, for me, I have Cormyrian Longbowmen living in the north in the border region, and considering that that area blends into the Dales somewhat, it makes sense that some of the Dales training and tactics have seeped into the tactics of border garrisons - especially amongst the militia (and nearly all Cormyrian towns have well-trained militia). So decent bowmen may not be available in the typical Purple Dragon Patrol (who would more likely use Crossbows), but you could definately find the 'Ranger Types' amongst the Scouts and Stoneland Patrols, and also in times of war when the local populace is conscripted.

Well, just like on historical Earth, longbowmen can come from anywhere. It was just that only England had them in enough numbers to be militarily significant.

I arm most my Purple Dragons with crossbows (which they usually keep on their mount), but offer the option of a longbow for anyone who grew up shooting one. It isn't worth the effort trying to train people who aren't already able to shoot the heavy bows.

For some reason, numerous canon sources mention Cormyte militia being forbidden training in archery. I've interpreted this to mean that the Obarskyrs have no with to see the local lords commanding troops that might challenge the Purple Dragons (which good longbowmen might do). Instead, Cormyte militia forms steady bill- or glaivemen (especially near the coastlands), Dales-style spear and shield militia (especially near the northern borders), surprisingly fine light auxiliary cavalry (near Waymoot) and experienced, but irregular, troops with bows, bucklers and backswords near the mountains on both sides.

I totally concur that individual hunters and/or guides would be fine additions to the Royal Scouts during times of war and that many of them would be exceptional bowmen. But the only organised groups of archers that the Dragon Throne fields are a part of the Purple Dragons and there is a concerted effort to recruit as many good longbowmen into that Archer Corps as possible.

Incidentally, according to many canon sources, Purple Dragons are always encountered on horseback. I've interpreted that to mean that even the infantry is given a horse to ride on patrols and to the battle, making them dragoon-style infantry.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

I also see Bando being developed by some Shaaran tribes - the ones that don't rely on cavalry, perhaps in areas around some of the small forests in the Shaar (where cavalry wouldn't work).

Yes, that might be an alternate use for Bando. But I've already made so many styles native around the Inner Sea that I thought that the Trackless Sea/Shining Sea area needed some love.

Besides, Sharran slaves in the Shoon Imperium clearly created Capoeira (by some other name) and it's now popular as an art form as well as self-defence among expatriate Sharrans in many other cultures. Or should we perhaps place it in Lapaiiyla?

Shaar does need some native arts, beside the Wemic Iklawa fighting. It has cavalry tactics, obviously, and a few mounted styles that I'll base on the Comanche tradition of horsemanship. Perhaps some of the more 'civilised' tribes will also have been influenced by their neighbouring cultures.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

I haven't gone through your entire (MOST impressive) list, so as I pick it apart, I will offer more commentary.
I'm looking forward to it.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Thanks for sharing this - Mark


No need to thank me. Shaundakul knows I've gotten plenty of use from your gorgeous maps.

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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
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Posted - 12 Aug 2008 :  12:36:12  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

For some reason, numerous canon sources mention Cormyte militia being forbidden training in archery.



I am not doubting you, but I am curious. Which sources are these?
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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

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Posted - 12 Aug 2008 :  15:24:58  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jorkens

quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

For some reason, numerous canon sources mention Cormyte militia being forbidden training in archery.



I am not doubting you, but I am curious. Which sources are these?


Well, it appears that the matter is more complex than I originally thought.

On page 55 of Volo's Guide to Cormyr, it notes that militia members in Arabel are 'trained in riding, arms and formation movement, but denied training in archery.' I think there are several other such references in Volo's Guide and I thought I had seen something of this nature in Cormyr, but I guess I was wrong.

But in the Cormyr accessory, however, there is a passage on page 29 which notes that the militia in Noktil 'primarily consists of archers'.

It's possible to reconcile the two passages, either by assuming that different lords have different rules for the militia and only some deny it training in archery, or, as I have chosen for my games, that archers aren't really trained by the military. Instead, good archers are actively recruited, either for the militia or Purple Dragons, since it is well known that it's all but impossible to teach someone to use a longbow if he doesn't start building up the necessary arm strength at a very young age.

I imagine that the Noktil militia consists of such archers and not militarily trained bowmen.

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Markustay
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Posted - 12 Aug 2008 :  18:41:06  Show Profile Send Markustay a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Unfortunately, I think you may be getting confused between the Purple Dragon Knights and the regular standing army. We see the Knights most often in novels, because they are the ones that go on all the patrols (being mounted lends itself to that). The infantry, on the other hand, is all stationed inside of keeps, towns, and cities, and raely are used for patrol-duty.

The exception being the Stonelands, where lighter-armored 'Ranger-types' are the norm for the region. Purple Dragon (Knights) do patrol into the Stonelands, but usually only in force, and only when the have an objective. For the most part, smaller squads of lightly-armored soldiers are used to get in and out quickly, on horseback, just to scout and scare off any smaller threats, like Goblin raiders or Zhent spys.

Most of this, mind you, is extrapolation from reading the Empires series (Crusade) and the Cormyr series - both of which show excellent examples of Cormyrian army tactics and typical troop rosters (and infantry does indeed play a heavy role, but as I have said, that is usually only seen by outsiders in times of war, when the army is on the march).

In fact, a main (yet minor) character of Crusade is named Razor John, and his normal trade is that of a fletcher, and he is known for his excellent archery prowess (and his Razor arrows, obviously). He is conscripted in the army (voluntarily) and is added to the ranks of Bowmen and infantry that support Cormyr's legendary Purple Dragon Knight Cavalry.

That novel is a great read, although a bit unrealistic (the 'good guys' should have been slaughtered).

"I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me" --- Dudley Field Malone


Edited by - Markustay on 20 Sep 2008 07:03:37
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Icelander
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Posted - 12 Aug 2008 :  23:21:55  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Unfortunately, I think you may be getting confused between the Purple Dragon Knights and the regular standing army. We see the Knights most often in novels, because they are the ones that go on all the patrols (being mounted lends itself to that). The infantry, on the other hand, is all stationed inside of keeps, towns, and cities, and raely are used for patrol-duty.

Purple Dragon Knights are a D&D splatclass that has little or nothing to do with Realmslore. The Cormyrean army is refered to as 'The Purple Dragons' and have been since the old grey box.

That means infantry, cavalry and archers, btw. They're all 'Purple Dragons'.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

The exception being the Stonelands, where lighter-armored 'Ranger-types' are the norm for the region. Purple Dragon (Knights) do patrol into the Stonelands, but usually only in force, and only when the have an objective. For the most part, smaller squads of lightly-armored soldiers are used to get in and out quickly, on horseback, just to scout and scare off any smaller threats, like Goblin raiders or Zhent spys.

Well, in my campaign, the Stonelands are regularly patrolled with both cavalry (soldiers trained to fight in formation on horseback) and mounted infantry (soldiers who travel by horse, but fight on foot). Every group of soldiers has at least one and sometimes more Royal Scout with them and war wizards are not uncommon. This is supported by references in Volo's Guide to Cormyr, the Cormyr accessory, the Cormyr trilogy, etc.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

Most of this, mind you, is extrapolation from reading the Empires series (Crusade) and the Cormyr series - both of which show excellent examples of Cormyrian army tactics and typical troop rosters (and infantry does inded play a heavy roll, but as I have said, that is usually only seen by outsiders in times of war, when the army is on the march).

Canonically, Cormyr does mount all its soldiers that do go on patrols on ponies or horses, whatever is appropriate for the terrain. We have no reason to assume that they have hordes of infantry that never patrol or fight except during the Crusade. In fact, it makes exceptionally little military sense to have infantry sit tight inside forts and not patrol the surrounding area.

The supposition that the Purple Dragons are a mixed force of dragoons (mounted infantry), archers and cavalry appears well supported in the published data. The fact that the dragoons may not have taken their horses to Thesk due to lack of space should not be taken to mean that they don't have horses at all when patrolling Cormyr.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

In fact, a main (yet minor) character of Crusade is named Razor John, and his normal trade is that of a fletcher, and he is known for his excellent archery prowess (and his Razor arrows, obviously). He is conscripted in the army (voluntarily) and is added to the ranks of Bowmen and infantry that support Cormyr's legendary Purple Dragon Knight Cavalry.

I am aware that the Purple Dragons have archers. What I was pointing out was that in most cases training militia members in archery would be a waste of time, since either they are competent archers or they are not. Historically, it took more than ten years to build the strength to use a warbow to any effect and I see no reason why things should be different in the Realms (D&D rules nonwithstanding).

Archers like Razor John (which is an awfully English name, btw) would of course be sought after for the army, since they have a valuable military skill that is too time consuming to train independently.

quote:
Originally posted by Markustay

That novel is a great read, although a bit unrealistic (the 'good guys' should have been slaughtered).


I should probably order it. I love a good military yarn.

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Jorkens
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Posted - 14 Aug 2008 :  09:04:59  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

quote:
Originally posted by Jorkens

quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

For some reason, numerous canon sources mention Cormyte militia being forbidden training in archery.



I am not doubting you, but I am curious. Which sources are these?


Well, it appears that the matter is more complex than I originally thought.

On page 55 of Volo's Guide to Cormyr, it notes that militia members in Arabel are 'trained in riding, arms and formation movement, but denied training in archery.' I think there are several other such references in Volo's Guide and I thought I had seen something of this nature in Cormyr, but I guess I was wrong.

But in the Cormyr accessory, however, there is a passage on page 29 which notes that the militia in Noktil 'primarily consists of archers'.

It's possible to reconcile the two passages, either by assuming that different lords have different rules for the militia and only some deny it training in archery, or, as I have chosen for my games, that archers aren't really trained by the military. Instead, good archers are actively recruited, either for the militia or Purple Dragons, since it is well known that it's all but impossible to teach someone to use a longbow if he doesn't start building up the necessary arm strength at a very young age.

I imagine that the Noktil militia consists of such archers and not militarily trained bowmen.



When in doubt I always go with Eds lore. Now, as Arabel has a bit of a special position in Cormyr as somewhat rebellious (along with Marsember) the ban on archery might be a local thing to keep the militia from being to big a threat against the Purple Dragons if trouble were to erupt.
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Wooly Rupert
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Posted - 14 Aug 2008 :  15:01:34  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think it far more likely that archery simply isn't taught, as opposed to being forbidden. It really doesn't make any sense to hamstring your forces by denying them the option of ranged combat.

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Icelander
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Posted - 14 Aug 2008 :  16:26:58  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

I think it far more likely that archery simply isn't taught, as opposed to being forbidden. It really doesn't make any sense to hamstring your forces by denying them the option of ranged combat.


While I agree that it's likely that archery isn't forbidden to civilians, I wouldn't say that doing so would be hamstringing Cormyr's forces.

The militia is meant to support the Purple Dragons, who do field archers, and they do have access to crossbows if necessary. I can't imagine many instances where a field army would be made up exclusively of militia.

But, as noted, I think that the lack of archery training is more of a practical issue than a legal one. It's simply impossible to make a good longbowman out of someone who hasn't been shooting a bow from childhood in a militarily useful timeframe.

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Icelander
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Posted - 10 Sep 2008 :  14:18:06  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
During game play, a few other styles have developed in my campaign.

Mulmaster School Fencing: Employing a heavy rapier or a cut-and-thrust sword, this style has a much more extensive complement of cuts than a typical rapier style. Those cuts are mostly taken from backsword techniques and the style is very much a battlefield form, not a sportive or artistic pursuit. The off hand is either used to hold a parrying dagger or it may be kept free for grappling. This is due to many battles being fought on shipboard, where it may be necessary to grab a hold of something quickly.

Unarmed techniques include sophisticated grappling and throwing, as well as striking with the off-hand and the sword guard.

Melvaunt Sabre-fencing: This duelling style borrows heavily from the mounted techniques of the Ride Barbarians, but still features fine wrist-control and mobile parries enough to warrant being accounted a fencing style. Duels are fought either on foot or on matched horses and are usually to submission, not death. The style is kinetic, fast and hard; requiring great strength and endurance to maintain for any length of time. Often, the off-hand is used to add power to a sabre cut or aid in a difficult parry.

Unarmed techniques and grappling is mostly avoided, but striking with the butt of the sword is occasionally seen, mostly to widen the range if caught in the clinch.

Sadlar Horsemanship: This mounted combat style comes originally from the Barony of Blacksaddle in the Border Kingdoms. It is a light cavalry fighting style, combining Shaaran tactics with tighter discipline and centralised authority to form a potent force against raiders from that land. It's recently grown fashionable for Chondathan mercenaries to field a force of Sadlars, but these Chondathan Sadlars more commonly use a crossbow than the composite shortbow.

The style employs a composite shortbow, the lance and a curved sabre. No shield is used and the off-hand is often used to steer the mount.

Hussar Cavalry Training: Cavalry employing Nars techniques are sometimes called 'Hussars', though the name is never used by the Nars themselves. It is considered by some sages to be a Damaran corruption of the Nar word 'h˙sz', or 'twenty' in Common, referring to the typical number of warriors in a raiding party. The armies of Impiltur, Damara, Thesk and several Vast cities field regiments of light cavalry trained in this manner, with some mercenary groups as far afield as Sembia and Chondath having adopted elements of the style (with varying fidelity to its original methods).

Several substyles are worthy of mention, including:

Ashanath Style: Ironically, the area for which this style is named can field only a few practisioners, largely due to a lack of good horses. Nonetheless, the Theskan army can field a couple of hundred men trained in this manner in a time of war.

The traditional Nar roots of this style have been combined with Tuigan elements, to the extent that horse archery is now a part of the standard training. The weapons include lance, bow, sabre and small shield. Armour is light or nonexistent and the tactics are more often harrying than direct. Horsemanship is highly prized, with veteran stylists often incorporating daring feats of riding into their combat, such as suddenly leaning from the saddle to deliver a cut at longer range than expected or dodging blows by twisting in the saddle.

Impiltur Hussar Training: Light cavalry has a difficult time of it in chivalrous Impiltur, but the military utility of such units is undeniable. As such, there are several formation of such troopers throughout the country, serving as scouts for the heavier knights that Impilturans revere.

The flashier equine acrobatics of the Ashanath style are officially discouraged by the Queen's Warblades, but the Hussars are still prone to acts of daring and derring-do. They constantly practise their horsemanship, seeking to rival the best knights in the land, and when it comes to fast riding over difficult terrain, they may very well be the masters.

The weapons they use is a small round shield, crossbow and sabre. Lances are sometimes used, but given that they are not expected to charge home against infantry, they are not emphasised.

Service of the Celestial: In Damara, Hussars are accounted elite troops, on par with knights in battle, even if they may not have their social advantages. A Hussar often swears himself to a specific god or a group of gods (the Triad is popular) and takes an oath never to show cowardice or caution. Most Celestial Hussars expect to die in battle before they reach the age of thirty.

Unlike Theskan or Impilturan Hussars, Celestial Hussars tend to wear at least some armour (typically mail) and they are trained and willing to charge home into ranks of infantry. A strange affectation that marks them is the feathered wings on their backs that they wear as part of their gaudy uniforms, a mark, they claim, of their service to the Celestial Hosts.

Celestial Hussars often carry small crossbows, but are not necessarily adept in their use, since they view themselves as primarily cavalry. They use long, but light, wooden shields and carry lances as well as two swords, a long thrusting one for piercing plate armour in the charge and a curved sabre for hunting broken infantry.

More styles as they occur to me, I guess.

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Edited by - Icelander on 25 Apr 2011 19:51:22
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bitter thorn
Learned Scribe

USA
184 Posts

Posted - 11 Sep 2008 :  03:27:58  Show Profile  Visit bitter thorn's Homepage Send bitter thorn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Excellent thread! I fully intend to revisit ASAP!

"Nobody listens to the Ranger!"

Our groups are all sticking with 3.X classic Realms.
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Darius Talynth
Seeker

Canada
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Posted - 14 Sep 2008 :  03:13:08  Show Profile  Visit Darius Talynth's Homepage Send Darius Talynth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Shaolin Kung Fu: Apart from its obvious Kara-Turan lineage, it might be the style practised by the monks of the Monastery of the Yellow Rose. Although I'd really prefer a different and more distinct style for those priests, the description of Kane's fighting rings true for either Shaolin or the cinema-friendly Wushu (which, to my knowledge, has no self-defence applications beyond looking good).


Great thread, Icelander. While I am not a martial arts practitioner myself I am a big fan of martial arts films - shaw brothers (5 venoms, 36th Chamber), bruce lee, to name a few. My apologies in advance as my actual understanding of the specifics of the various real world martial arts is rather limited.

I was thinking about your interest to place Shaolin kung fu at the Monastery of the Yellow Rose. I myself have a character, a damaran paladin who was partly raised as a youth at this monastery following the death of his family. Before finding his calling as a paladin, he was trained in the disciplines and fighting styles of the temple. As a paladin, he fights unarmed - unless it becomes necessary to draw his blade, his last resort if you will.

I imagine that you could pick some of the shaolin techniques and rename them for the creatures and culture of the area local to the Yellow Rose. Some examples: "8 animal fist" could be renamed after the "remorhaz" that these monks are famed for riding, "dragon style" could be simply technique of the gold or silver dragons that inhabit the surrounding mountains, perhaps another technique could refer to the nearby glacier, maybe another is a style inspired by the snow leopards that dwell in the mountains, how about renaming "Taizu's fist" for Ilmater or st. sollars, the god and saint to whom the monastery is dedicated. I'm sure you can think of many others - let's not forget that the good folk of damara have faced their share of fiends and other evil beasts and that could also inspire or require new and unique styles to be developed at the yellow rose.

These are just some ideas and as the bloodstone lands are one of my favorite regions of Faerun so I thought I would chime in with these. Keep going with your thread!
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Christopher_Rowe
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
879 Posts

Posted - 14 Sep 2008 :  13:58:39  Show Profile  Visit Christopher_Rowe's Homepage Send Christopher_Rowe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In case y'all haven't seen it, there's a monk character with great expertise in unarmed combat in Jaleigh Johnson's Mistshore, one of the two new Realms novels.

My Realms novel, Sandstorm, is now available for ordering.
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Amarel Derakanor
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97 Posts

Posted - 17 Sep 2008 :  17:16:55  Show Profile Send Amarel Derakanor a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well met.


In my chronologies(campaigns), I actually use a so-called "homebrew" rules-system, that could be described as a mixture of 3.x/2ed.-systems, with an emphasis on not getting hit, instead of the standard (most hit-points wins) DnD systems.
Getting a full-force hit by an axe is very deadly, just as it should be.

Anyhow, while my system still uses features, it also makes use of proficiencies (much like that from the 2nd ed.).

So, this thread inspired me to try to break down some (alot) of the styles presented here into "proficiencies", that grants flavour to one's character...

I thank you for a great idea!
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bitter thorn
Learned Scribe

USA
184 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2008 :  06:24:26  Show Profile  Visit bitter thorn's Homepage Send bitter thorn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'll give a try at contributing something useful. Wish me luck.

Dwarven Axe Craft

Dwarves take immense pride in their various crafts whatever they may be. They often spend their long lives mastering their chosen craft. Dwarven Axe craft is no exception.

Dwarven Axe Craft is a broad category of martial arts encompassing dozens of centuries of bloody martial history. Its subsets are far too numerous to examine in exhaustive detail here. Many styles teach a high level of focus with all types of axes. The Dwarven fighter substitution level 1 ability of axe focus reflects this subset of the craft. Some masters are said to teach optimizing damage with all forms of axes as well as improved accuracy with all kinds of axes. Other styles are focused on specific racial enemies. Many styles emphasize bringing down and avoiding larger opponents. Some schools, such as Shielded Axe train heavily in the use of the heavy Dwarven war axe in conjunction with the buckler and hand axe, but not to the exclusion of powerful two handed killing strokes with the Dwarven war axe.

Of course this does not even begin to address the closely guarded secrets of the Discipline of the Anvil also known as the martial training of the Dwarven Defender or many other martial arts of the Dwarven people.


edit: spelling

"Nobody listens to the Ranger!"

Our groups are all sticking with 3.X classic Realms.

Edited by - bitter thorn on 18 Sep 2008 07:30:31
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bitter thorn
Learned Scribe

USA
184 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2008 :  07:09:08  Show Profile  Visit bitter thorn's Homepage Send bitter thorn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A Nar ranger in one of our groups inspires this.


The path of the Horse Brother.

Little is known of this rarely seen martial art. Many of the Horse brethren (or rarely sisters) favor light armor of hide or chain shirts. Some disdain shields in favor of stout bracers serving a similar function. Swords and longspears are among their favored weapons, and many use strong short bows in the Tugian tradition. Sabers and axes are not uncommon. The use of the longspear in a brutal charge with both hands is one of the most feared attacks of these master horsemen. However the hallmark of this martial art is an almost superhuman bond between the horse brother and his steed akin to the bond between many a paladin and his steed. Their horsemanship is nothing short of astounding. They combine the most reckless acts of mounted mastery with martial skill as confidently as most warriors would draw their swords. One Horse Sister who migrated to Cormyr with her sisters has found herself in such high demand for her stunning knowledge of equine husbandry and mounted warfare that she could all but name her wage if not for her loyalty to her Cormyran noble comrade in arms and his kin.

quote:
Originally posted by Icelander

During game play, a few other styles have developed in my campaign.

Mulmaster School Fencing: Employing a heavy rapier or a cut-and-thrust sword, this style has a much more extensive complement of cuts than a typical rapier style. Those cuts are mostly taken from backsword techniques and the style is very much a battlefield form, not a sportive or artistic pursuit. The off hand is either used to hold a parrying dagger or it may be kept free for grappling. This is due to many battles being fought on shipboard, where it may be necessary to grab a hold of something quickly.

Unarmed techniques include sophisticated grappling and throwing, as well as striking with the off-hand and the sword guard.

Melvaunt Sabre-fencing: This duelling style borrows heavily from the mounted techniques of the Ride Barbarians, but still features fine wrist-control and mobile parries enough to warrant being accounted a fencing style. Duels are fought either on foot or on matched horses and are usually to submission, not death. The style is kinetic, fast and hard; requiring great strength and endurance to maintain for any length of time. Often, the off-hand is used to add power to a sabre cut or aid in a difficult parry.

Unarmed techniques and grappling is mostly avoided, but striking with the butt of the sword is occasionally seen, mostly to widen the range if caught in the clinch.

Sadlar Horsemanship: This mounted combat style comes originally from the Barony of Blacksaddle in the Border Kingdoms. It is a light cavalry fighting style, combining Shaaran tactics with tighter discipline and centralised authority to form a potent force against raiders from that land. It's recently grown fashionable for Chondathan mercenaries to field a force of Sadlars.

The style employs a composite bow, the lance and a curved sabre. No shield is used and the off-hand is often used to steer the mount.

Hussar Cavalry Training: Cavalry employing Nars techniques are sometimes called 'Hussars', though the name is never used by the Nars themselves. It is considered by some sages to be a Damaran corruption of the Nar word 'h˙sz', or 'twenty' in Common, referring to the typical number of warriors in a raiding party. The armies of Impiltur, Damara, Thesk and several Vast cities field regiments of light cavalry trained in this manner, with some mercenary groups as far afield as Sembia and Chondath having adopted elements of the style (with varying fidelity to its original methods).

Several substyles are worthy of mention, including:

Ashanath Style: Ironically, the area for which this style is named can field only a few practisioners, largely due to a lack of good horses. Nonetheless, the Theskan army can field a couple of hundred men trained in this manner in a time of war.

The traditional Nar roots of this style have been combined with Tuigan elements, to the extent that horse archery is now a part of the standard training. The weapons include lance, bow, sabre and small shield. Armour is light or nonexistent and the tactics are more often harrying than direct. Horsemanship is highly prized, with veteran stylists often incorporating daring feats of riding into their combat, such as suddenly leaning from the saddle to deliver a cut at longer range than expected or dodging blows by twisting in the saddle.

Impiltur Hussar Training: Light cavalry has a difficult time of it in chivalrous Impiltur, but the military utility of such units is undeniable. As such, there are several formation of such troopers throughout the country, serving as scouts for the heavier knights that Impilturans revere.

The flashier equine acrobatics of the Ashanath style are officially discouraged by the Queen's Warblades, but the Hussars are still prone to acts of daring and derring-do. They constantly practise their horsemanship, seeking to rival the best knights in the land, and when it comes to fast riding over difficult terrain, they may very well be the masters.

The weapons they use is a small round shield, crossbow and sabre. Lances are sometimes used, but given that they are not expected to charge home against infantry, they are not emphasised.

Service of the Celestial: In Damara, Hussars are accounted elite troops, on par with knights in battle, even if they may not have their social advantages. A Hussar often swears himself to a specific god or a group of gods (the Triad is popular) and takes an oath never to show cowardice or caution. Most Celestial Hussars expect to die in battle before they reach the age of thirty.

Unlike Theskan or Impilturan Hussars, Celestial Hussars tend to wear at least some armour (typically mail) and they are trained and willing to charge home into ranks of infantry. A strange affectation that marks them is the feathered wings on their backs that they wear as part of their gaudy uniforms, a mark, they claim, of their service to the Celestial Hosts.

Celestial Hussars often carry small crossbows, but are not necessarily adept in their use, since they view themselves as primarily cavalry. They use long, but light, wooden shields and carry lances as well as two swords, a long thrusting one for piercing plate armour in the charge and a curved sabre for hunting broken infantry.

More styles as they occur to me, I guess.


"Nobody listens to the Ranger!"

Our groups are all sticking with 3.X classic Realms.
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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1229 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2008 :  13:51:03  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Amarel_Derakanor

Well met.


In my chronologies(campaigns), I actually use a so-called "homebrew" rules-system, that could be described as a mixture of 3.x/2ed.-systems, with an emphasis on not getting hit, instead of the standard (most hit-points wins) DnD systems.
Getting a full-force hit by an axe is very deadly, just as it should be.

Anyhow, while my system still uses features, it also makes use of proficiencies (much like that from the 2nd ed.).

So, this thread inspired me to try to break down some (alot) of the styles presented here into "proficiencies", that grants flavour to one's character...

I thank you for a great idea!


You're welcome.

I use GURPS myself, so I know what you mean about not getting hit. I have GURPS writeups of most of the styles available, but I'm unsure how much that would help scribes here.

Za uspiekh nashevo beznadiozhnovo diela!

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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

1229 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2008 :  13:54:50  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bitter thorn

I'll give a try at contributing something useful. Wish me luck.

Dwarven Axe Craft

Dwarves take immense pride in their various crafts whatever they may be. They often spend their long lives mastering their chosen craft. Dwarven Axe craft is no exception.

Dwarven Axe Craft is a broad category of martial arts encompassing dozens of centuries of bloody martial history. Its subsets are far too numerous to examine in exhaustive detail here. Many styles teach a high level of focus with all types of axes. The Dwarven fighter substitution level 1 ability of axe focus reflects this subset of the craft. Some masters are said to teach optimizing damage with all forms of axes as well as improved accuracy with all kinds of axes. Other styles are focused on specific racial enemies. Many styles emphasize bringing down and avoiding larger opponents. Some schools, such as Shielded Axe train heavily in the use of the heavy Dwarven war axe in conjunction with the buckler and hand axe, but not to the exclusion of powerful two handed killing strokes with the Dwarven war axe.

Of course this does not even begin to address the closely guarded secrets of the Discipline of the Anvil also known as the martial training of the Dwarven Defender or many other martial arts of the Dwarven people.


edit: spelling


As it happens, I have detailed a few of those styles. I'll append them in GURPS form below.

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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

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Posted - 19 Sep 2008 :  13:58:36  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Battlerager Rasslin'

'Corltharn' (lit. 'Killing Lust')

4 points

The unarmed style of dwarven battleragers, all fury and no fancy form. It does contain some advanced grappling techniques and can be devastingly effective when used by a strong dwarven warrior. This style is nearly always combined with a dwarven armed style, but some crazy dwarves fight only in their spiked armour.

The battlerager will nearly always aim to close with his foe and achieve a standing grapple. He will then pummel his opponent into insensibility and beyond. Knocking foes down and pummelling them there is sometimes done and some stylists prefer to fight on the ground. This makes them somewhat unique among dwarves, who tend to prize balance and sure footing above all else.

Defence is done without giving ground and usually with a hard block to inflict damage. Committed Attacks often follow a successful defence and Defensive Attack is rare or even unknown. The running slam is a signature move for this style, either a Drop Kick or a regular slam where the stylist leads with a Headbutt or another attack.

Skills: Brawling; Sumo Wrestling; Wrestling.
Techniques: Agressive Parry (Brawling); Arm Lock (Wrestling); Choke Hold; Drop Kick; Elbow Strike (Brawling); Elbow Drop (Brawling); Ear Clap (Brawling); Eye Gouge (Brawling); Eye Rake (Brawling); Hammer Fist (Brawling); Head Butt (Brawling); Head Lock; Knee Drop (Brawling); Knee Strike (Brawling); Neck Snap; Stamp Kick (Brawling); Targeted Attack (Brawling Punch/Face); Targeted Attack (Elbow Strike/Skull); Targeted Attack (Hammer Fist/Skull); Uppercut (Brawling); Two-handed Punch (Brawling); Wrench Limb (Wrestling); Wrench Spine (Wrestling).
Cinematic Skills: Breaking Blow; Flying Leap; Immovable Stance; Kiai; Power Blow.
Cinematic Techniques: Backbreaker (Wrestling); Eye Pluck; Piledriver (Wrestling); Roll with Blow.
Perks: Drunken Fighting*; Focused Fury*; Improvised Weapons (Brawling); Iron Arms; Iron Hands; Iron Neck; Neck Control (Brawling); Power Grappling; Special Exercises (HP may exceed ST by 50%); Special Exercises (DR 1 with Tough Skin); Style Adaptation (Any Dwarven); Sure-Footed (Uneven); Sure-Footed (Slippery); Technique Mastery (Head Butt).


Optional Traits

Secondary Characteristics: Improved HP
Advantages: Combat Reflexes; Fearlessness; Fit or Very Fit; High Pain Threshold.
Disadvantages: Bad Temper; Berserk; Bloodlust; Code of Honor (Dwarven); Compulsive Carousing; On the Edge; Overconfidence; Vow (Never retreat from battle).
Skills: Autohypnosis; Judo; Jumping; Karate.
Techniques: Ground Fighting (Wrestling or Brawling); Leg Lock (Wrestling); Low-Fighting (Wrestling or Brawling); Lower-body Head Lock (Wrestling); Lower-body Leg Lock (Wrestling); Lower-body Neck Snap; Scissor Hold (Wrestling); Targeted Attack (Brawling Punch/Leg Joint); Targeted Attack (Brawling Punch/Foot Joint); Targeted Attack (Brawling Kick/Leg Joint); Triangle Choke (Wrestling). For a stylist with the Karate skill, any Brawling technique which can default to Karate is also available in a Karate version.
Perks: Armour Familitarity (Judo or Karate); Biting Mastery; Ground Guard; Improvised Weapon (Karate); Iron Legs.

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Edited by - Icelander on 19 Sep 2008 14:14:51
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Icelander
Master of Realmslore

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Posted - 19 Sep 2008 :  14:03:27  Show Profile  Visit Icelander's Homepage Send Icelander a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Earthfast

'Deladar Sonn' (lit: 'Sink into the solid rock')
(Gold Dwarven Wrestling)


6 points

This style is the ancestral wrestling form of Gold Dwarves. It is a popular sport among dwarves, with nearly all dwarves learning the basics, and it also functions as practical self-defence. Matches are fought in a very religious setting and dwarven Earthfast masters are usually priests or monks of Clangeddin Silverbeard or Moradin.

The style is emphasises staying on one's feet and outlasting the enemy. It teaches various ways to rush at foes and unbalance them or even sweep them off their feet, but against another Earthfast master, matches usually become standing grapple contests where the steady and slow application of pressure decides the victor.

Skills: Games (Earthfast); Judo; Sumo Wrestling; Wrestling; Wrestling Sport.
Techniques: Arm Lock; Choke Hold; Head Lock; Neck Snap; Sweep (Any skill in style); Trip; Wrench Limb; Wrench Spine.
Cinematic Skills: Immovable Stance; Kiai, Push.
Cinematic Techniques: Backbreaker (Wrestling).
Perks: Armour Familitarity (Judo); Iron Arms; Iron Legs; Iron Neck; Power Grappling; Special Exercises (FP may exceed HT by 50%); Special Exercises (Lifting ST+1); Style Adaptation (Any Dwarven); Sure-Footed (Uneven); Sure-Footed (Slippery); Technique Mastery (Judo Throw); Technique Mastery (Sweep); Unusual Training (Immovable Stance, only on prepared Earthfast Hall ground).


Optional Traits

Secondary Characteristics: Improved FP
Advantages: Fearlessness; Fit or Very Fit; High Pain Threshold.
Disadvantages: Code of Honor (Dwarven); Disciples of Faith (Dwarven religions); Overconfidence; Sense of Duty (Dwarves).
Skills: Autohypnosis; Breath Control; Dancing (Earthfast Rumbling); History (Clan History); Judo Sport or Art; Meditation; Philosophy (Dwarven mysticism); Religious Ritual (Any Dwarven); Savoir-Faire (Earthfast Hall); Theology (Any Dwarven); Wrestling Art.

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