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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Wooly Rupert Posted - 09 Jan 2019 : 16:19:25
It occurs to me that Ed has been posting Realmslore on the Twitter, and not everyone has the Twitter.

So I thought a single place where such lore could be collected would be a good thing.

Ed is a frequent poster there, adding all sorts of Stormtalons and Epic Fantasy stuff, but for the purposes of this thread, I'd like to keep it focused on his Realmslore.

(I'm also stickying this thread, to make it easier to find)

Ed Greenwood (@TheEdVerse) on Twitter

The #Realmslore hashtag on Twitter
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
questing gm Posted - 18 Oct 2021 : 02:50:42
On Rymdyl

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449785835616878597

Oct 18 2021

@Artie_Pavlov

Hi @TheEdVerse. Is there any lore on Rymdyl you can share? Or is it NDA?

@TheEdVerse

See p84 of THE BORDER KINGDOMS, a canon-official hardcover Realms sourcebook by Alex Kammer and yours truly, available at the DM's Guild.

Update: rival adventuring bands have recently settled there, and are digging everywhere for Rymdyl's never-found treasure.

@Artie_Pavlov

Nice! was that particular piece of lore leftover from the old magazines era?

@TheEdVerse

Not "leftover" in terms of cutting-room-floor, no. Never put forward for publication. It's part of my ongoing "unfolding lore for NPCs because they're not static, they get up to as much as the PCs" DMing lore notes.

The Realms is ALIVE.
questing gm Posted - 18 Oct 2021 : 02:48:14
On Seven Sister spell to create turtle soup

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449851281154191364

Oct 18 2021

@KaitlinBHoward

I remember reading that one of the seven sisters liked turtle soup so much that she created a spell to summon it. Which sister was that?

@TheEdVerse

Alustriel. See page 66 of FOR6/THE SEVEN SISTERS. Her fellow sisters don't share her wild fondness for it, though some of them like it. El and Khelben use the spell more often to drench a foe's head in turtle soup unexpectedly than they do to gain a meal.
questing gm Posted - 18 Oct 2021 : 02:45:46
On 'torchtowers' in Waterdeep

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449855042543050754

Oct 18 2021

@Sundered_Ant

Hope your medical issues are treating you well @TheEdVerse. I have a hopefully simple question - what exactly are the "torchtowers" in Waterdeep? I get the impression they are like signal towers, but are they a specific set of towers?


@TheEdVerse

I'm tired from my annual stress echo, but okay, just suffering through the 2 weeks of wearing a Holter heart monitor that gets in the way of everything.

Every tower along the city walls has three beacon-fires laid ready for lighting (if a beacon has to be kept alight a long time, the unlit two get cannibalized as fuel for the lit one, as more firewood is brought up from storerooms below in the tower), but "torchtowers" is the collective name for wall-towers that aren't also city gates or major "moot-towers" where walls meet. So any "just another tower" along the wall is a torchtower. (Every walltower contains dungeon cells, a Watch "ready room," locked storage rooms for evidence/confiscated items retention, some bedchambers and garderobes, and a tiny armory.)
questing gm Posted - 18 Oct 2021 : 02:43:11
On elves' good alignment

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449567588816769026
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449587683454488583
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449589943014146048

Oct 17 2021

@RossFisherDavis

@TheEdVerse guess this one isn't an easy question at all, but how can the Elven attitude to other races be considered morally 'good'? The aggressively xenophobic, sometimes homicidal immediate reaction to any non-elf in Myth-Drannor for example.

@TheEdVerse

Every culture has their own definitions of good and evil, of fairness and progress, and their own moral code. These are seldom static.

Adventure and storytelling often lie in the clashes, and the learning/changing of personal and societal views.

@RossFisherDavis

So the alignment chart in turn can only really apply to singular characters, not a civilization or a society as a whole.

@TheEdVerse

Exactly.

Many elves would reject the very notion of other races judging them, but as with humans, dwarves, and others, individual elves who travel more, and have more contact with other races and places, tend to have broader views (more tolerance).

Halflings who live in human-dominated cities are among the most flexible and tolerant, particularly if they live in cosmopolitan cities (like the ports of Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate) and see many different folk, from many lands.

I've always seen alignments as a baseline for determining the "usual prevailing views/attitudes" of a group (e.g. race or army), but even then, the lived experience of "this particular" group will largely determine their views. (If you're always raided by orcs, you'll see orcs negatively. If they aid you, no).

@RossFisherDavis

Thankyou for the response by the way! I read through the entirety of Elminster's stories again during lockdown 2020-2021 and it was a wonderful escape.

@TheEdVerse

You're welcome!

In El in Myth Drannor, I repeatedly showed elves sneering at "lesser" humans...even as they displayed the same ignorance, decadence, folly, etc. they saw as "human nature."
questing gm Posted - 17 Oct 2021 : 03:43:06
On suitable name in Rashemi for a small fishing village at the mouth of River Ashan

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449199035768844291

Oct 16 2021

@davespring

Dear @TheEdVerse what would be a suitable name in Rashemi for a small fishing village at the mouth of River Ashan? I'm going to run The Sinister Secret of Saltmarsh in Rashemen.

@TheEdVerse

Here are four possibilities, from my old, faint pencil Rashemen notes:
Ishtel, Telmar, Ultanir, Yarloran
questing gm Posted - 16 Oct 2021 : 03:06:02
On the first race in space

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448808893753221126

Oct 15 2021

@moonringblue

@TheEdVerse what was the first race in space in the forgotten realms?

@TheEdVerse

As usual, that's a "lost in the mists of time" debate.

If you mean Torilian ground-dwelling races who somehow got up into space (beyond lone powerful spellcasters), almost certainly the elves (see Spelljammer), but many races have their (conflicting) beliefs.

And how you define "space" also comes into it. Giants have had floating/flying cities (not all of them cloud cities) for as long as "anyone" can remember.
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:41:36
On the Stonelands

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448673180927860741
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449550290928246786

Oct 14 2021

@MarcoVolo9

Hi @TheEdVerse ! I read that the Stonelands is a very rocky land, with cracks, water and trees everywhere, but how do caravans or Purple Dragon's patrols can go throught it? How does Redspring inhabitants wander around their village? Thanks, it could help my current campaign :)

@TheEdVerse

The Stonelands is almost all exposed bedrock, with a very thin coating of topsoil, anchored by wind- and cold-stunted trees. Except in the bottoms of the ravines, where centuries of rotted-down trees and vegetation have accumulated into often-rich soil.

The best way to picture it is: imagine a huge hill of mashed potatoes in front of you on a long platter. You take a fork and drag it right-to-left- and left-to-right through the mash, leaving horizontal deep furrows. Those are the ravines, with almost bare, sometimes knife-edged ridges between them, and lots of trees and water and tangled vines down at the bottom of them.

You’ve just made a model of the Stonelands.

So even pack mules have a hard time traversing it. Individual able-bodied folk with packs on their backs can CLAMBER through the Stonelands, but no one’s going to be marching or taking wagons through it. So no caravans go through it, except by the one wide-enough, flat-enough route (involving Yellow Snake Pass) that the Zhentarim took over and controlled; everyone else (including the Zhents) go around.

Purple Dragon patrols don’t enter it; on rare occasions, an army will be sent into it, but no one patrols it.

There’s not enough arable land to grow enough food for large settlements, and no reason to settle there. It’s hunting and foraging country.

As for Redspring: will answer later, must rush off to work at the day job now!


@MarcoVolo9

Hi @TheEdVerse! ...How does Redspring inhabitants wander around their village? Thanks, it could help my current campaign :)

@TheEdVerse
On foot, quite happily. Except when riding in goat- or mule-drawn carts for transporting-goods reasons, or sledges in winter snow.


As I wrote in Volo’s Guide To Cormyr (although an editor removed all the commas between the place names in that sentence), Redspring lies in “ideal grazing country because of their numerous ponds and rivulets, and so numerous shepherds and keepers of herds of goats, cattle, and other herd animals have come to live here over the years.”

Which should make it obvious that it doesn’t lie in the Stonelands proper. The term “Stonelands” is used locally in upland/back country Cormyr specifically to mean the terrain of knife-edge exposed bedrock ridges with breakneck-steep ravines between, not “everything up north, there,” as a dockworker or shopkeeper who’s never left Suzail might think of it; to outlanders and folk who live in Suzail and Marsember, the Stonelands may be a big east-west band that marks where the settled realm ends, on the north, but to folk in Eveningstar and Arabel, things are more nuanced.

So there are fingers of topsoil-covered terrain reaching north into the Stonelands in several places. Redspring is in one of them. It stands in well-watered (many springs rising, and flowing down and out of it), hilly but with topsoil, ranching country.

Hillmarch is also located in the same sort of countryside: rolling hills, with very little level ground, but topsoil and not bare rock ridges. There are exposed rock faces (cliffs your sheep can fall over) here and there, but plenty of wild grass-covered dirt to walk around on.

Redspring gets its name from the reddish hue of the springs that rise in it (the local drinking water), which is red due to a lot of dissolved iron from the rocks beneath. If there weren’t richer, better iron deposits much farther south and closer to the coast, there’d likely be iron mines near Redspring. As it is, it’s ranching country, shipping wool and mutton, goats and goat-milk cheese, and smoked, salted sides of beef south to the heart of Cormyr, and east to the Dales and Moonsea lands.

- Edited on 17/10/21 to add new tweets
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:37:03
On exarchs, demigods and portfolios

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448495742893633539

Oct 14 2021

@LeslieCourtne14

Hey Ed. In 4e it was said that Obould had become an exarch of Gruumsh. What does that mean? Is he like a demigod or something? If so, what would Obould’s portfolios be?

@TheEdVerse

An exarch may be CALLED a demigod by mortals, and an exarch has extraordinary powers and is said to have “ascended” from mortality, but exarchs aren’t gods (they are lesser than gods). Many attract their own worshippers, and some can grant some spells, but they are divine servitors of a “real” deity (so, above Chosen but below a true demigod); if you’re not pledged to a deity, you can’t be an exarch.

Exarchs don’t have their own portfolios, but can reflect or specialize in an aspect of the portfolios of the god they serve (if there was a god of trash, an exarch serving that god might aid and pay attention to makers and users of trash can lids). Many exarchs of the Realms live in the Realms as opposed to on another plane, and the precise nature of their powers (like the spell granting) depends in large part on what the deity they’re pledged to grants/allows them to have (so it varies, from exarch to exarch).
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:33:28
On Vorhardruil

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448482438485774337

Oct 14 2021

@CorpsThese

I know the tweet (https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1235717834828726272) is a bit old, but where can I find more information about this Vorhardruil ? If there is.

@TheEdVerse

Right here. ;} Nothing's been published elsewhere, he's from my home Realms campaign lore. He lives in the overgrown ruined city in the heart of the Wealdath, when he's not traveling the Realms destroying "troublesome" undead (many of his targets are in large cities).
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:17:33
On Star Elves and Orcs in 15 century on the Sword Coast.

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448476001978179587
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448476890528878592

Oct 14 2021

@PesoReview

1) Dear Mr. Ed Greenwood, would you help a noob brazillian player of D&D?
I’m doing my files to a new campaing and i really like to create solid character, with tight backgrounds but i’m looking for certain infomations and can’t find it anywhere.

2) I would like to ask you some informations about Star Elves and Orcs of 5e during 15 century on the Sword Coast.
About elves i need to know where they lived during this time and which elves were notorious (wizards, noble, important families and such).

3) And about Orcs i need to know which barbarian tribes lived on the Sword Coast in that time and the class of each tribe. Sir, if you could help me i would be tremendously grateful.
Or if you could only point me where on the books i could find it it would be excellent also.

4) The adventure goes by the 1490 DR.
Can you help me with this answers? i would be eternally grateful.
Thanks in advance! and thank you very much for all your amazing work on D&D

@TheEdVerse

Hi, and well met!
Happy to help, but I’m not sure what you mean by the “class” of each orc tribe: ?

Star elves are still few and reclusive in the 1490s DR Sword Coast lands; most dwell far to the east, in the Yuirwood (Aglarond). Those who live in the Sword Coast lands tend to keep to forests (notably The High Forest, but also in the southernmost Moonwood [southernmost Glimmerwood], the Misty Forest, and Westwood), and to have willing contact with sun elves, wood elves, wild/green elves, moon elves and half elves; they detest everything about crowded cities (especially the smells) and mistrust humans (whom they see as too swift to violence in all disputes; “you never know when a human will turn on you, blade in hand”). Many humans may mistake a star elf for a moon elf at a chance meeting, and there are star elves who travel, explore, and adventure in the Sword Coast North (not so much in Amn, Tethyr, Calimshan, and other heavily populated areas farther south).

Among these are the star elf merchant families of Evemdrel and Saeyil, and the noble family House Dahlmkess (who believe assimilation in a “sentient civilization” of all “civilized” races, against “the Rapacious Ones” [orcs and other goblinkin such as goblins and hobgoblins, illithids, beholders, and Lolth-worshipping drow] is inevitable, and is better managed—so star elves can end up controlling or influencing the “unfortunate” belligerent tendencies of humans—than resisted). In this, Dahlmkess differs from most other star elf nobility, notably the conservative houses of Lalaundura and Rannekho.

Powerful star elf wizards include Varlroke, a gruff and prickly loner (male, old, mysterious); Avaeya Fonril, a kindly advisor and tutor to many (female, charismatic, seen as wise and caring); the star elf adventurers Shasslammaera “Tash” Relouvrin (fiery-tempered, acrobatic, agile, and worldly-wise, usually having back-up plans ready in case of treachery) and Telharl Velvoor (gleeful, whimsical, young, sword-tongued, and fun-loving). Among (all) elves in the region, as much about these individuals is commonly known as I’ve given here (with Tash being the best known), but in, say, human cities and among human sages, only Varlroke has been heard of.

Some star elves of the High Forest are planning a military conquest of The Reaching Woods, to make it a new home and exterminate or drive out the gnolls. Others think this is an unwise, overbold idea that will inevitably give star elves too high a public profile.

As for the orcs, the descendants of Obould continue to rule an orc kingdom from Dark Arrows Keep (Lorgru ascended the throne in 1485 DR, after orcs in the region were defeated in the War of the Silver Marches), but there are “barbarian” orc warbands wandering the Sword Coast North as there have always been (just as hobgoblin warbands, usually 20-30 strong, wander to this day). Regardless of the politics of any particular moment, the root causes of orc behaviour in the Sword Coast North remain: orcs breed like rabbits in many caverns in the mountains across the North, out-populate their available food and must forage farther and farther afield in their food-hunts, and in the end either form an orc horde and sweep south plundering until exterminated, or if no strong orc leader arises who wants to command a horde, individual warbands of starving orcs go out in search of food and wander the lands. In the 1490s DR, the mountain-orc-dominated Kingdom of Many Arrows is free of starvation, thanks to cultivation, to trade, and to rearing “meat herds” of rothé and other livestock in mountain valleys. It also nows civilized discipline. So aside from renegade warlords (as the ill-fated Hartusk) on the fringes of the kingdom, there will be patrols and hunting bands, but no Many Arrows warbands.

However, there are many warbands of other orcs, orogs, half-orcs, and the like wandering the Sword Coast lands.

Orc barbarian tribes with names like Evil Eye, Death Moon, Broken Bone, Vile Rune, and Rotting Eye are found in the Greyhawk setting.

In the Sword Coast North of the Forgotten Realms, the only similar orc name is “the Broken Rune,” and it’s not a tribal name, but an allegiance/philosophy: the Broken Rune refers to an orc legend about a pact (the Rune) among orcs, elves, and dwarves, broken millennia ago, that orcs believe the other two races broke, and that this justifies orc raids “to get even.”

Orc warbands will bear the name and device their leader favours, so in the 1490s: The 40-50-strong warband led by Othrogh Four-Arms, a battle-scarred, cunning old veteran with graying skin and four arms, has a badge (and name) of Four Fists, drawn in a counter-clockwise, crooked-down-to-punch pinwheel. The 30-plus warband of the shrewd, sneering Guthmur, a mountain orc with a deep scar that clefts his left jaw, is the Reavers, and its badge is a black scythe-blade, dripping many drops of red blood, on a white banner field. The almost-40-strong warband of the grim, gigantic orc brothers Durth (the talker) and Targh (the silent mountain) are The Mighty. Their badge is an upright, fingers-to-viewer orc left fist that’s jutting spikes all around.

The Maragog orc tribe of (caverns deep in) The Crags sends out three to five “bring back food and prove yourselves” warbands of young members (all classes and genders) every year. All fly a maroon banner adorned with a row of four black talons. They bear the names Pride of Maragog, Valor of Maragog, Reach of Maragog, Thirst of Maragog, and Fang of Maragog, and these names get endlessly recycled, with different personnel.

There are also many smaller, lesser-known, or recently formed warbands led by powerful orcs, or an orc shaman-plus-two or three brute warriors nucleus, and they tend to be named for their leaders.
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:07:55
On the right pronunciation for Lolth

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448471277266776065

Oct 14 2021

@GethOverlord

Pardon, would you settle a disagreement? How do you pronounce Lolth? My partner and I agree that both our pronunciations are acceptable. But you, quite literally, wrote the book.

@TheEdVerse

ALL pronounciations are acceptable, because regional accents across the Realms (above and below the surface) have different vowel sounds and emphases. "LO-ull-thh" (but faster) is common around Waterdeep, but as you go east and north, you'll hear "LOW-th." And so on.
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 01:01:27
On toilets in Waterdeep

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448783221618003978
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448472771630182402
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449019972345372676
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1449403169629515780

Oct 15 2021

@RpgMatch

If there are sewers in Waterdeep, does that mean there are toilets too?

AND are there canonically any poorer areas where there are cesspools, simple latrines, or even areas where night soil is thrown out of chamber pots down into the street? Are there any laws preventing this?

@TheEdVerse

Oh, yes. This has all been covered, multiple times. (There's even a scene in Cormyr in one of my novels where a character is paying to empty her chamber pot into the regular nightsoil wagon.) TSR did tend to censor graphic details of garderobe/privy/jakes use.

So, the quick answer is that clubs, eateries, and the homes of the noble and wealthy have garderobes (toilets), that flush with foot-treadles; the water comes from rooftop rainwater cisterns that can be filled in dry weather by pumping. Hand-pumps serve most washbasins adjacent to them, and everyone has a standing-right-by ewer for pouring water to flush, and for carrying water elsewhere or dumping it over your head while washing hair.

And everywhere has a bumstick and a sluices-stick (they go by various politer regional names, such as “athorn” and “dollurd,” respectively, in Waterdeep). You use the former to scrub your behind, and the latter to clean the toilet seat and area; both otherwise reside in receptacles of pleasantly-scented water that submerges their “business ends.” Both are stout short sticks with old towels, handcloths, or scraps of clothing affixed to one end.

They’re normally made to look clearly different from each other, so one won’t be mistaken for the other, but otherwise tend to be of similar construction and form.

Less affluent addresses may lack a cistern, or access to it for all garderobes. When that access doesn’t exist, the facilities will still have the two sticks and the ewer (and a by-the-sink handpump, unless it’s elsewhere and the water is brought to the garderobe by ewer), and the water from the ewer is poured down the garderobe to flush it. Busy garderobes may have a row of filled ewers, with “house rules” about taking down an emptied one and returning it filled, if you poured it.

Most rooftop cisterns are screened to keep dead birds and critters and leaves from clogging the water-flow, and they drain roof slopes into the cistern, which has its own overflow into any rooftop garden or greenery, and then another overflow into downpipes, which take excess rainwater down to balcony plantings or windowboxes, and then the street (where drainage gutters should carry it away, often using alleys for this rather than major streets).

Really poor addresses, and garderobes or servants’ sleeping areas, may use chamberpots (metal or ceramic vessels, without or without lids, but usually having stout handles) for facilities; these have to be carried and emptied into a nightsoil bin (often a water-filled cistern, to keep the smell down, out of which solids are “dipped” with a giant ladle that hopefully doesn’t get used for anything else, into a nightsoil wagon to carry it away.

In the Deep, that “away” destination is usually the Rat Hills, well to the south of the city.

Many nobles buy stable waste, and the manure of their own stables, for wagon-carting as fertilizer to their own country estates, up “the Amphail Road.” They would very rarely trust dung from any other source for this purpose.

One last note: some older garderobes flush with pull-levers on the wall, rather than foot-treadles.


@RpgMatch

Most excellent information. Thank you!

Do the garderobes have traps to keep the smell of the sewers/cesspools out? Or has that innovation not been discovered/implemented?

@TheEdVerse

Garderobes in wealthy homes have "two-steps." There's a water trap part way down the garderobe shaft [which may be shared by several garderobes]: foot-treadle opens its floor to dump water and sewage; when it closes, water from a holding tank refills, shut off by float. A second water trap (same mechanics, but usually larger) is in the cellar, where all shafts enter a common pool, right above the drop into the sewers. ALL city properties must, by Lords' decree, have a "sewer trap" (what we would call a "backflow preventer") thanks to tides entering the sewers (which is what "washes them clean," daily). This decree quietly doesn't extend to properties east of North Ward, at the bottom of the cliff.


@hierodula

I want to see illustrations of water deep with roof cisterns because I don’t recall ever seeing one

@TheEdVerse

They're in the attic space (if Waterdhavian houses were built like modern North American ones, within the roof trusses, so UNDER the roof-slopes), and filled by roofpeak drain-holes, so the house heat keeps them from freezing in winter.

- Edited on 16/10/21 to add new tweets
- Edited on 17/10/21 to add new tweets
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 00:49:25
On ignoring the Spellplague

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448465836327505921

Oct 14 2021

@PrMatteus

Can a DM just ignore the spellplague? Would it be a lot of work to convert the 5e Realms adventures to the 1370-1380s DR?

@TheEdVerse

A DM can ignore anything they like. And no, if you put STORY first (and that's really CHARACTERS first), it's never a lot of work to convert. "Reality" at your gaming table is what the PCs experience. Lorebooks different? I guess Volo lied again. He does that a lot.
questing gm Posted - 15 Oct 2021 : 00:46:55
On the new Thay book

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448464922136940548
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448470181383127041
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448474274705072132

Oct 14 2021

@GHC_and_Tacos

Our new Thay book (@TheEdVerse Alan Patrick and myself) is really coming together nicely. It is going to pull back the veil on Thay and let every see what life in Thay really is like. I am excited to get this out to everyone soon!

@TheEdVerse

Thay behind the curtain. I was going to say behind the red robes, but that's another book entirely. There's enough in this book to tour Thay, at the gaming table, and not leave the poor DM frantically inventing the unfolding countryside.

Bring Thay to life at LAST.

@TywinResists

How do the Red Wizards feel about Rath Modars Thayan Resurrection and betrayal?

@TheEdVerse

As in, an official position? They've been silent. (And an official position is about the only way by which the Red Wizards would have a monolithic, uniform view.) It's safe to conclude that Szass Tam disapproves, but it's not safe to conclude anything else.

@BraynerPereira1

Will the book consider the events after the Haunted Lands trilogy?

@TheEdVerse

The book is set "right now" Realms-time.
questing gm Posted - 14 Oct 2021 : 00:54:41
On Volo's Enchiridion in Waterdeep: Dragon Heist

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1448130327415869441

Oct 13 2021

@DnMeAdventures

@TheEdVerse, could you please speak to how connected Waterdeep: Dragon Heist is to Waterdeep works of the past?

I'm going through Volo's Enchiridion in the back of the book and is this 5e work connected to all the other versions? Or does it deviate? Or is it all still Ed Canon?

WDH is the first @Wizards_DnD campaign book I've read and it's absolutely SOAKING with lore and I love it and it's all deliciously overwhelming, but I don't know how deep it all goes.

Even though I've been playing #dnd #dnd5e for ~6 years now, I'm still VERY new to all the lore.

@TheEdVerse

The Enchiridion is the best distillation of what a visitor new to Waterdeep needs to know, and the most up to date guide.

Its brevity means it leaves out a lot of details (e.g. the laws in the Code Legal, and the who/where/what of the guilds and noble families).

What is in there is all correct (a marvel, considering Volo's involvement!) and matches my own older canon. So you can trust it, and build on it.

Volo's Guide to Waterdeep has more adventure hooks and shop details, and the 2e City of Splendors boxed set provides lore for the big gaps I mentioned (plus Eric Boyd's superb Noble Families web enchancement, that should still be up on the Wizards website). If you can find Steven Schend's Waterdeep By Night series on the same website, you'll be covered for hauntings, too!
Wooly Rupert Posted - 13 Oct 2021 : 02:46:54
To expand on the above, a bit... The original question was if the clergy of Gond created prosthetics, and if there was a preference for those, over magical healing.

The answer was rather involved, but a large part of it was the fact that priests capable of casting regenerate are fairly uncommon -- so magical replacement of limbs simply wouldn't be an option for most folk.

Additionally, sometimes such magic wouldn't work: if a person was born missing a limb, for example, then it couldn't be magically regenerated.

So Gond's temples do make prostheses, and they will take money, if it's offered -- but they'll also give the prostheses out in return for services rendered to the church. These services would often be small things, advantageous to the faith -- things that your average commoner would be able to do.

And offering prostheses is something of a long-term investment for the church, because the recipients will come back to the church if the artificial limb needs to be adjusted, or modified, or replaced.

I don't believe it was stated, but this could also impact the recipient's faith -- you're going to look favorably on the deity whose followers have improved your life and/or made it possible for you to live a normal life.
questing gm Posted - 13 Oct 2021 : 00:43:29
On functionality of Gond prosthetics

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1447747214168764417

Oct 12 2021

@Greysil_Tassyr

@TheEdVerse As a followup to a podcast question... How functional are the prosthetics made by Gond's clergy? Obviously, the wealthy would get better ones, but how much functionality would a "stock" piece provide?

@TheEdVerse

Any stock piece has a GREAT "yoke" to attach to the wearer, and good joints. Feet flex at the ankle, hands have a grip (thumb and fingers) and a finger you can point, both manipulated by your other hand (i.e. you move thumb or finger/s into position, and they "hold").

@Greysil_Tassyr

Thank you for the swift reply, friend Ed!

I assume that someone who could pay for a custom piece would get nearly complete, if not full functionality?

@TheEdVerse

Replying to @Greysil_Tassyr

Yes.

The most expensive pieces have pay-to-renew cleric spells that keep them bonded to the body and give pretty good motor control. So, fingers that can do delicate work but not feel pain.
questing gm Posted - 11 Oct 2021 : 02:54:48
On Elminster's final advice

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1447257298288644104

Oct 11 2021

@ArcanistKing

Hey @TheEdVerse, would you have any parting words/advice El would give to my party as he shares his final moments with them? He has been an ally of the party most of the campaign and the villains have caught him. My party would love to hear his final words right from the creator!

@TheEdVerse

"Every ending for one is a beginning for others, and the gods grant us all too short a time. So make good use of thine. Ye need not move mountains or rule realms. Just be thyself, make the world better than ye found it, and LOVE others, kindly. Few kings manage that."
questing gm Posted - 10 Oct 2021 : 04:07:13
On bard colleges in Baldur's Gate

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1446502188336009216

Oct 8 2021

@EoghanMacmillan

Hey Ed, quick wee question: are there any extant bardic colleges (or similar institutions) in Baldur's Gate? From what I read the College of Cli was there historically, but anything else of note? Thanks in advance Slightly smiling face

@TheEdVerse

There's The House Of The Lute on Ulvur's Lane, halfway up the "bowl" above the harbour; a modest kaeth house/minstrels' gallery at streetfront, but offers instruction (soundproofed chambers) from masters, above and behind. Small but great library.

@EoghanMacmillan

Replying to @TheEdVerse
Cheers! So that'd be Lower City, right? Either Steeps or Eastway, depending on which side of the harbour we're talking. Anything in the Upper, at all? Not really sure how many would be appropriate for a city this size.

Also, uh, "kaeth house"? Not familiar, please define... #128563;#128517;

@TheEdVerse

In the Steeps (higher up, not dockside-close).

Kaeth is one of the Realms words for coffee, so a "coffee house" venue.

In the Upper City, there are half a dozen clubs at which bards and minstrels regularly perform, but no colleges. A handful of old retired bards teach for coin at their dwellings (one has a house in the Upper City, but most live in rented upper rooms across Eastway).

The Gate tends to be more a "earn coin, DO things," hustle place than it is a "train and learn and consult libraries" place.

The houseowning bard in the Upper City who trains for coin is the half-elf Sharintra Ironmrantel. Her old, narrow high house fronts on Lamprepurr Lane (Temples District). She wears old, tattered shawls over worn-smooth leathers.
questing gm Posted - 09 Oct 2021 : 02:12:02
On Elvish words for "sylvan" or "of the forest/woodlands"

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1446266238238330881

Oct 8 2021

@gkrashos

@TheEdVerse Okay, last one. I promise. Well, for a while. Maybe, only a little while. Addiction is a terrible thing ... how do elves and dwarves describe something as "sylvan" or "of the forest/woodlands"? Thanks Ed, you're the best!

@TheEdVerse

For sylvan or of the forests/of the woodlands, elves say that something is of the woods/forest as it should be, and instead of using the elven words “aar” for woodland or “or” for forest, they use the word “laraelever.”

laraelever = (literally “of-heart-home”) of the woods/forest as it should be (unblighted, unscorched by fire, uncut by the uncaring who clear, as opposed to harvest in harmony with sylvan life cycles and continued growth)

An elf might use this word to describe a curved piece of wood in furniture that grew that way and was harvested, as opposed to a piece that was carved out of a much larger piece of wood.

For UNTOUCHED sylvan areas (by which elves mean: no non-woodland-being trails cut through, and no woodcutting), the Elvish word is “araeladonever” (heart-peace-home).
questing gm Posted - 09 Oct 2021 : 02:09:28
On Zelbross not known from published lore

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1446276252260786181

Oct 8 2021

@smparlin

@TheEdVerse Sir, Ed!! Cira 1300s, is there anything about Zelbross you can share we might not know from published lore? How much did you flesh it out in the home realms game and did the Knights stop by?

@TheEdVerse

The Company of the Crazed Venturers, not the later Knights, visited Zelbross, and there’s a faint 1978 pencil map and key somewhere in my Shipping Container 1 (the 80-footer).

The hamlet sprawls along the west bank of Brossaddan’s Water (later called “the Hark Rill” and later still “the Harkril”), a tiny local stream that empties into the Delimibyr, which is where the superb-for-pottery clay banks are. “Sprawls” because there’s a cluster of homes, outhouses, and “half dug into hills” storage barns (for winter food) nigh the river and then a wide arc of outlying farms around it, reached by a spiderweb of lanes (grassy tracks to minimize traffic-caused mud, with two thick lines of berrybushes planted along both sides so you don’t get lost trudging home in a winter whiteout blizzard and freeze to death, to provide a little wind cover, and to provide berries and a supply of edible critters that come to forage on the berries). It had an inn on the Shining Trail (the Last Place) and a tavern, The Sly Fox, and a secret Harper safe haven: the farm of the recluse Harthress “Hard Axe” Shaenra, a scarred, fat old retired adventuress with long, wild white hair, a deep, white, puckered sword-scar running straight down a viewer’s left side of her face, and a gravel voice mainly used to spew long and complicated oaths (“By the untasted teats of the stillborn sow!” and the like). She was, of course, a Harper, and wore bracers (normally hidden under the tattered sleeves of her filthy old weathercoats) that could catapult multiple sleep-poisoned darts. Though she did most of her fighting with axe and blade.

The countryside north of Zelbross, up to the forest, was very rich in game (deer and foxes and “gurra” [the local name for groundhogs] in particular, and several Zelbrossans maintained extensive and successful trap-lines by which they fed their families and neighbours, and gained lots of pelts to cure and make into winter clothing.

There’s not a lot more that I can recall off the top of my head and drawing on the campaign notes here in my office, but near Zelbross, in the wilds northeast of the hamlet, is the “bottle-tomb” of an ancient wizard (a hole in the ground lined with stones that’s the rough shape of a bottle, that a dead person is ‘buried’ in standing up) that at one time—and may still—have a scepter, some rings, and a spellbook in it; the Venturers found it, but didn’t plunder it.
questing gm Posted - 09 Oct 2021 : 02:04:11
On Karsus' next of kin

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1446502188336009216

Oct 8 2021

@mcmurphy510

@TheEdVerse got a quick #realmslore question for you.

Did Karsus of Netheril (the momentary god) have any siblings or family?

Thanks for your awesome world!

@TheEdVerse

At the time of his momentary godhood, Karsus had only one surviving kinsman: a nephew, Raent. Who detested everything his uncle did, and was.

Raent was an arcanist with his own "wild talents" (i.e. a sorcerer as well as a mage). And disappeared, likely deliberately.
questing gm Posted - 05 Oct 2021 : 02:25:31
On minotaurs' favorite marinades

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1445029541433462785

Oct 4 2021

@TheEdVerse

Deeper and deeper into the minotaur’s maze
We fared, only to stop, drop our jaws and gaze
At the firepit where the beast on a spit did raze
Foe after foe, in a trice, after marinating them for days

@MissMartinsen

I had no idea minotaurs were such gourmands! What kind of marinades do they favor? :)

@TheEdVerse

According to my father, "roast blood of insurance salesmen," but he may have been projecting. ;}

Seriously, I'd say they would crush lemons, limes, oranges, quince, persimmons, and even tomatoes.
questing gm Posted - 03 Oct 2021 : 14:51:09
On Calimport in Alzhedo

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1444171700120207363

Oct 2 2021

@gkrashos

Hi Ed. I was just struck by something. Calimport wouldn’t be called that by its citizens. “Port” is a word in Common (English). So is the name Calim(Alzhedo word for “port”) or something else entirely?

@TheEdVerse

Heh. The thing is, the Alzhedo word for "port" is "ulport" (and the "u" vanishes when it's combined into a name, so, "Calimport"). Of old, ulport was "ulporth."

The Common Tongue borrowed the word from Alzhedo.
questing gm Posted - 03 Oct 2021 : 14:48:56
On house numbering system in Waterdeep

https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1444489071858966529
https://twitter.com/TheEdVerse/status/1444812430119481347

Oct 3 2021

@RpgMatch

Replying to @PuckinDM
House numbers in Waterdeep is definitely a question for @TheEdVerse. How does the house numbering system work, Ed? #waterdeep

@TheEdVerse

It doesn’t. ;}

Numerical street addresses are still being introduced, and very messily.

The system was a Lord Neverember innovation.

Before he became Open Lord, buildings in Waterdeep had “roll numbers” in the Palace tax records and floorplan registry, but only the owners/taxpayers and the Palace knew them. What citizens knew was how to describe the location of where they lived. See my answer of April 25/20 about a specific building, which is “eastfront Irimmar’s Walk, two doors north of Selduth Street, Trades Ward.” Everything is ‘so many doors’ from a streetmoot (intersection), temple, pump, civic building, or city gate. And “eastfront” in this example means means fronting on the east side of the street.

To echo what I said in an earlier reply, the Realms isn’t a copy of our real world. Some things developed in different ways there, and are done differently, in the Realms.

@CommonplacePub1

#RealmsLexicon "Streetmoot" - intersection

@TheEdVerse

"Streetmoot" in a city, "waymoot" out in the wilderlands (roads and trails intersecting or crossing).


- Edited on Oct 5 2021 to add new tweet.

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