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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Lamora Posted - 05 Oct 2016 : 00:31:12
So the last Farideh book came out today. I plan to buy the kindle sometime soon. Anyone already started it?
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Wooly Rupert Posted - 09 Apr 2018 : 20:12:02
I've heard only good things about those books, myself. I've only read one, though, and it was the one that was part of the Sundering series. Perhaps because I wasn't familiar with the characters and their backstory, the book did not grab me.
Markustay Posted - 09 Apr 2018 : 19:30:51
Not sure where the best place to ask this was, but someone had sent me the map from one of her books of the Ash Lake region, and I need to know a few things, like, what exactly are these (settlements or ruins?) and if settlements, what exact size?

Arush Vayem (which has a '?' next to it on the map)
Djerad Thymer
Djerad Kethendi
Arush Ashuak

Firetrees (now a ruin) was left off the map (it should have definitely been on there), and I think both Red Haven and Ssintar should have been as well (there is some weirdness up in the north there - the Methwood is showing a bit too far south, so either the map has some 'warpage' (which I am assuming not right now), or that forest has grown (I note several others - especially in this region - have done so).

I think I am going to have to buy her novels. I swore-off reading any more FR novels since 4e, and although I've already made a few exceptions, I am not 100% happy I did so (sot that the books were bad, they were just extremely depressing... and talked about a 'setting' I had no interest in).

I'll probably post a 'map snippet' of this small area as soon as I know what these are, because I am extremely happy with how it came out (the map actually worked perfectly when rotated with north 'up'). Its the first time I've been happy with the Ash and Lance Lakes since I was introduced to them. I haven't being doing the 'snippet' thing in quite some time, but I'd kind of like Erin's approval on this (since I DID meet her at Gencon 2012, although I doubt she remembers me... I was the very large fellow that Brian James was hanging with LOL).
sleyvas Posted - 21 Jan 2017 : 22:52:23
Oh, and I'm still only partway through the books, but I'm half wondering something on the weave not working. An argument could be made (and I will do so) that with the spellplague affecting both worlds that portions of Abeir MIGHT be in contact with the weave. In fact, any lands transferred there might still be capable of arcane magic. Granted, the magic may need to be relearned or something like what happened after the spellplague (personally, I'm working on something which would mean it possibly worked better in Abeir than it did in Toril following the spellplague). Similarly, since we saw primordials show up in Toril, the divine may have also been involved in Abeir.
sleyvas Posted - 21 Jan 2017 : 22:44:26
I just started reading this two days ago between work, but I loved the fact that we're getting more details on Abeir throughout the book and a look at what happened with Unther. Its modifying some of what I had planned for the area, but not necessarily for the worse. I would like to note certain things though as a kind of way to update the area.

1st, there was still a division between the Mulhorandi and the Untherans within Abeir (i.e. they did not join in some kind of "Mulan" movement). The Untherans were treated as slaves by the Mulhorandi. This is slightly different from the view we have of the Mulhorandi who have returned and abolished slavery represented in the SCAG.

2nd, the Mulhorandi were in either an alliance or subservient to the genasi realm of Shyr. The question of whether the Chosen beings that are with them now as noted in the SCAG were with them in Abeir unclear at the point where I am in the book right now (and I suspect won't be made more clear). My suspicion would be that some former incarnations of the deities (and remember, prior to the ToT, multiple incarnations of a given deity existed at the same time amongst the royal families) in Abeir were re-invested with the power of incarnations while in Abeir, and eventually they enacted a ritual that pulled down the manifestations of the gods again but into the flesh of one of their incarnations.

3rd, Gilgeam is in cahoots with the demon prince Graz'zt somehow. He has several Goristro (the bull men), plus other more minor demons.

Gonna finish reading other peoples notes in this thread, in case there's more than just wondering about the product line.

Also, on the Abeir side. Where Arush Vayem is is the crystalline corpse of Petron (a dawn titan), where Greenfields is is paraphrasing "pit that reaches down into the heart of the plane, where a song that never ends repeatedly echoes" and in the corresponding area to the plains of central Tymanther is a "stone tower that none dare breach".
Irennan Posted - 26 Nov 2016 : 16:32:28
Can an Untheric/Mulhorandi manifestation survive without the deity herself backing it? To my understanding, it kinda works like an avatar, so if Nanna-Sin has his manifestation again, I suppose that they managed to resurrect the deity himself.

But then, they were able to survive on Toril by carrying a large part of the main deities' power before Ao took down the barrier, and the manifestations rejoined the main deities. And when a deity puts so much power into a single avatar, even if the main part of the deity is "dead", won't they essentially live through, or become, their avatar. What difference would there be at that point?

Or Perhaps they resurrected something akin to an incarnation of Nanna-Sin (as far as I can tell, an incarnation is effectively a separate mortal entity, although still deeply connected to the deity herself, and incarnations became non-divine after the ToT)?
Mirtek Posted - 26 Nov 2016 : 16:20:18
Finally finished it and sad the series is over now.

Yes, the ending felt a little rushed, but I had the same feeling with 95% of all FR trilogies. Almost as the author happily writes and writes and writes and then suddenly realized it's the last 10% of the third book, better wrap everything up.

One thing that bothered me a little was that after all the talk about how one can't rip the spark out of a deity without destroying her, they could hand over the spark of Nana-Sin quite easily.

And what about this immortal-but-not-divine ressurected Nana-Sin? What is he now? What exactly did they ressurect? The dead deity through the remains of his manifestation? Only the manifestation but cut of from the deity who is still on the outer planes? Is the true deity Nana-Sin even still alive somewhere on the outer planes or did he find some other demise long after losing his manifestation on Toril?
sleyvas Posted - 22 Nov 2016 : 14:11:23
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

One thing I didn't expect in the book was the trip to Abeir, which was really interesting, and cool.

I didn't realize that no gods, meant no weave, which meant magic limited to that which doesn't need the weave like Azuth's Staff, Gilgeams divine spark, Dawn Titans and they're Relics, innate magic like Dragonborn breath, and Caisys unique spellscar.

I think it would be a strange setting to explore more very different from its sister Toril.

In fact as strange as this sounds like I think Ashes of the Tyrant and The Devil You Know are likely the closest thing to a setting books as you'll get for 5e Old Empires and Abeir.




Whoa, they showed Abeir and discussed its magic.... hmmm, I may have some conflicts... I definitely need to read this now. I just started fire in the blood. I got way too much to read.
CylverSaber Posted - 20 Nov 2016 : 19:54:01
What's the deal with the succubi being on both sides of the devil/demon battle? First they were demons, then with 4e they became devils, and now they're what? Both?

Oh, and Lorcan was definitely evil. You can argue how and why and if it's his fault, but you don't deliberately infect someone you supposedly care for with a plague from Hell, and threaten to let someone's family be slaughtered by Shadovar unless they agree to never speak to the love of their life again (at the cost of their soul!) if you're just neutral.
CorellonsDevout Posted - 17 Nov 2016 : 17:47:26
I agree.
Gyor Posted - 17 Nov 2016 : 17:38:59
quote:
Originally posted by Schreckstoff

quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

People are way too hard on Lorcan, no body in Lorcan's position would have done better.

Lorcan literally grew up in hell, brutalized, tramatized, beaten where everyone wanted to use him or kill him, where he never experienced a moment of love or compassion.

Then he finds himself trapped between the competing demands of cosmic beings, gods and god like beings, with enternal torment, oblivion, and possiblity worse. And on top of that he falls in love, an emotion he has no capacity to deal with, love its a alien thing to him which entered his system.

The end of the book WASN'T a second chance for Lorcan, it was a first chance for Lorcan and in a way his sister.

Anyone who villifies Lorcan needs to ask themselves in Lorcan’s shoes would I have done better (hint the answer is a resounding no).

Dalh group up on a farm surrounded by people who loved him, Lorcan grew up in hell surrounded by people who abused, used, and hated him.

None of that excuse his actions. Lorcan rarely complained about his lot in life and we really don't know how he grew up. Receiving no love is hardly traumatizing for someone mostly incapable of such.
It's not a comparison between him and Dahl, Lorcan is a terrible being possibly not of his own fault but still.



We do know that he grew up in hell and physically abused by his larger, stronger sisters.

Lorcan isn't evil, he's Lawful Neutral. And Lorcan was abit abusive, but not because he wanted to be, but because he was deseperate, he was in horrible situation.

Lorcan deserved a fair chance to be a person and that is what Farideah gave him.
Quil Posted - 22 Oct 2016 : 23:26:50
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

People are way too hard on Lorcan, no body in Lorcan's position would have done better.

Lorcan literally grew up in hell, brutalized, tramatized, beaten where everyone wanted to use him or kill him, where he never experienced a moment of love or compassion.

Then he finds himself trapped between the competing demands of cosmic beings, gods and god like beings, with enternal torment, oblivion, and possiblity worse. And on top of that he falls in love, an emotion he has no capacity to deal with, love its a alien thing to him which entered his system.

The end of the book WASN'T a second chance for Lorcan, it was a first chance for Lorcan and in a way his sister.

Anyone who villifies Lorcan needs to ask themselves in Lorcan’s shoes would I have done better (hint the answer is a resounding no).

Dalh group up on a farm surrounded by people who loved him, Lorcan grew up in hell surrounded by people who abused, used, and hated him.



Yeah. Lorcan is evil. That's kind of the point. He emotionally abuses Farideh every chance he gets throughout the entire series. It doesn't matter why.

A lot of the devils that are slaughtered in various FR books could've been mortal souls that have climbed the infernal hierarchy. The fact that a mortal might've been tricked or seduced into selling their soul or getting corrupted, and then twisted and tormented in afterlife, doesn't really make a whole lot of difference as to whether that horned devil needs to die. Because it's just evil.

Lorcan isn't as bad as a lot of devils, of course. But he's outright abusive against Farideh. There's nothing good for her with him. Perhaps in a century Lorcan will have grown into a decent person and proven himself to be Good. But now? He's evil.

Schreckstoff Posted - 18 Oct 2016 : 20:17:21
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

People are way too hard on Lorcan, no body in Lorcan's position would have done better.

Lorcan literally grew up in hell, brutalized, tramatized, beaten where everyone wanted to use him or kill him, where he never experienced a moment of love or compassion.

Then he finds himself trapped between the competing demands of cosmic beings, gods and god like beings, with enternal torment, oblivion, and possiblity worse. And on top of that he falls in love, an emotion he has no capacity to deal with, love its a alien thing to him which entered his system.

The end of the book WASN'T a second chance for Lorcan, it was a first chance for Lorcan and in a way his sister.

Anyone who villifies Lorcan needs to ask themselves in Lorcan’s shoes would I have done better (hint the answer is a resounding no).

Dalh group up on a farm surrounded by people who loved him, Lorcan grew up in hell surrounded by people who abused, used, and hated him.

None of that excuse his actions. Lorcan rarely complained about his lot in life and we really don't know how he grew up. Receiving no love is hardly traumatizing for someone mostly incapable of such.
It's not a comparison between him and Dahl, Lorcan is a terrible being possibly not of his own fault but still.
CorellonsDevout Posted - 18 Oct 2016 : 16:49:49
I am a Lorcan fan, myself. He was probably my favorite character in that series.
Gyor Posted - 18 Oct 2016 : 16:29:05
People are way too hard on Lorcan, no body in Lorcan's position would have done better.

Lorcan literally grew up in hell, brutalized, tramatized, beaten where everyone wanted to use him or kill him, where he never experienced a moment of love or compassion.

Then he finds himself trapped between the competing demands of cosmic beings, gods and god like beings, with enternal torment, oblivion, and possiblity worse. And on top of that he falls in love, an emotion he has no capacity to deal with, love its a alien thing to him which entered his system.

The end of the book WASN'T a second chance for Lorcan, it was a first chance for Lorcan and in a way his sister.

Anyone who villifies Lorcan needs to ask themselves in Lorcan’s shoes would I have done better (hint the answer is a resounding no).

Dalh group up on a farm surrounded by people who loved him, Lorcan grew up in hell surrounded by people who abused, used, and hated him.
Quil Posted - 15 Oct 2016 : 23:17:38
I loved the book, but I could've enjoyed it more if it had been two books, at least. I won't say that it felt rushed as such, but there were so many things that deserved more attention. Bryseis's and Alyona's backstory, the trip to Abeir, the final battle that was over before it barely started, the actual incarnation of the gods on the material plane, Tam could've gotten more than minor appearance ... yeah. All things considered, I think Evans did an amazing job with what she was allowed to write. Everything wrapped up very neatly. Almost, at least.

The only plotline I felt was just cut completely: what happened to Dahl's kickass grandmother?

I'm so relieved that Farideh ended up with Dahl. I like Lorcan as a character, I enjoy reading about him, but his relationship with Farideh was so abusive I'm not sure he even deserved the chance Farideh gave him in the end.

I would've loved to see more about the aftermath in Djerad Thymar, with Dumuzi, Mehen and Kallan. Mehen and Kallan especially. I'm still really glad that Mehen survived, at least. Extremely glad that they got some screentime as a couple, sort of. Must be the most screentime any same-sex couple has gotten in the Forgotten Realms novels?

One thing I never really understood was exactly how the ritual that gave Asmodeus his godhood worked. He basically absorbed Azuth, and then the ritual Bryseis performed did ... what? Strengthen him? Enabled him to keep Azuth imprisoned inside himself?

The execution of splitting Azuth and Asmodeus was really neat, though. Seeing some more of it would've been great, but still. Very neat. I was a bit worried that it'd end up feeling forced, but this felt like a good resolution.

CorellonsDevout Posted - 14 Oct 2016 : 16:54:56
Brimstone Angels
Brimstone Angels: Lesser Evils
The Adversary (which is part of the Sundering series)
Fire in the Blood
Ashes of the Tyrant
The Devil You Know
sleyvas Posted - 14 Oct 2016 : 13:52:01
quote:
Originally posted by Gyor

Yes, but especially Ashes of the Tyrant and the The Devil You Know, but the other books are good for giving context to the characters.



I had started her original book and got pulled into other things. As with many things, I've always heard good stuff about her work, but since it was 4e, I kind of wasn't that concerned. I've recently started buying up 4e novels to read on amazon (for instance, I didn't know there were more Lythari in the east books until recently). What are all of her books, so I can buy and read them all in order?
Gyor Posted - 13 Oct 2016 : 22:06:37
I'm guessing infernal. I think it might be pronounced Frien-Ike, maybe.
Eltheron Posted - 13 Oct 2016 : 07:28:22
Just unlurking long enough to say I'm very much enjoying "Devil You Know" by Evans.

And that I'm sad it's the end of the series. :(

Semi-random question, though: how is "Phrenike" pronounced, and which from which region/language is that name associated? Just wondering, a very cool character.
Schreckstoff Posted - 11 Oct 2016 : 17:38:57
He's no Faraun but yeah he's a likeable. Maybe because he's somewhat hapless for a devil surviving in the 9 hells.

Havilar never particularly grew on me so I don't really care for much on her side. Their story is the least resolved tbh. Do they stay with the Dragonborn, do they want to partake in their son's life, do they become mercenaries,... Even in the epilogue they were kind of an inconclusive afterthought.
CorellonsDevout Posted - 11 Oct 2016 : 17:10:13
I just had a thing for Lorcan. Would I want to meet him irl? Nooo lol, but I like "devilish" characters. It wasn't a healthy relationship, to be sure, but I got the impression Lorcan really wanted to try, in the end. Dahl is better for her, but I was rooting for both.

I would really have liked to see more between Kallan and Mehen.

I am also happy Zoonie survived. As a dog lover, I always worry about the canine companions of characters.
Schreckstoff Posted - 11 Oct 2016 : 14:18:02
How anyone could still ship Lorcan after all these books baffles me, it's not just that Dahl is better for her, their relationship was literally abusive before they became intimate already.

I liked that Fari for once took time to plan instead of making it up as she went.

Something more definite regarding Kallan and Mehen would have been nice, not sure if Verthingeturish Mehen ending is to my liking though. It's not like they changed their way and traditions that caused him to rebel in the first place.
CorellonsDevout Posted - 11 Oct 2016 : 04:54:27
Here is my review *spoilers*

I was a bit worried about how this storyline would end, but it concluded better than I expected. All the characters I cared about survived. A part of me was kind of hoping a…triad between Dahl, Fari, and Lorcan would form, because I couldn’t decide who I wanted her end up with. Dahl was better for her, as she said, but I like the “devilish” characters. Either way, I am glad Lorcan survived. I was kind of worried about what was going to happen, since he was in a precarious position. It ends with him starting a new path in life (that’s literally the last scene), and I am curious to see what happens, but I realize this is the end of the series. The characters I cared about survived, so I was happy about that.

The ending felt a bit rushed, as often to seems to be the case in fantasy novels (fantasy is my love, so don’t get me wrong, I breathe the genre as much I breathe yaoi manga, but the endings are often rushed). There is all this build-up to the ultimate confrontation, and then that confrontation is a bit hurried. But it was still a good ending. It blew things up without blowing them up, if that makes any sense. I am glad things turned out all right. I actually kind of enjoyed the scene where Havi and Fari were in the Fugue Plane. That was interesting. I love things involving the gods, and I always feel better when there is an afterlife, though depending on who you are, that can be good or bad, in the Realms. I don't have siblings, but I liked the theme of sister-bond. Alyona and Bisera’s story was tragic, but selfless in the end.

Fari kind of annoyed me in this book, in a way she hadn't before. As Mehen thought at one point, she was moving too slowly. Then again, she was dealing with a bunch of stuff at once that I can't even imagine, so I should cut her some slack. She just seemed very...within herself? I guess? I still like her, but she did bother me more than usual.

But that shows the power of Evans' writing. Her characters are flawed, making them believable. I would like to see more about the development between Enlil and the dragonborn. I'm glad for Kallan and Mehen (I would have liked an ending scene with them, but at least we know Mehen has a companion in him), and Duzumi really grew on me in this book. It was touching at the end to see Fari, after everything she'd been through, still nervous about Dahl's family. All in all, I enjoyed this book, as I have enjoyed all the Brimstone books. It was epic, with diverse characters and lots of conflict.
CorellonsDevout Posted - 11 Oct 2016 : 04:41:26
I just finished it.
Gyor Posted - 10 Oct 2016 : 21:04:49
Yes, but especially Ashes of the Tyrant and the The Devil You Know, but the other books are good for giving context to the characters.

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