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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Smyther Posted - 09 Feb 2005 : 23:26:36
Well, as my first post on the archives (which I have actually been reading for some time but never joined), I'd like to pose a wide reaching question. Which areas of Faerun are covered by the novels? I ask this because I am looking at writing fiction in the realms (and maybe trying to get published), and I want to know where I can write without pre-existing books barging in. Specifically, I am interested in the areas of Erlkazar, the Forest of Lethyr, and the desert of Raurin.

But, the whole spectrum should be considered, I think. Here's my list so far:

Dark Elf Trilogy: Menzoberranzan, the northern Underdark, and the area south of Sundabar.
Icewind Dale Trilogy: Icewind Dale, the far north, and the Sea of Swords to Calimshan.
Legacy of the Drow Quartet: ?
Paths of Darkness Quartet: Calimport, and more mentioned above.
The Hunter's Blades Trilogy: Citadel Abdar and more of the North, (Lone Drow?), (Two Swords?)

Daughter of the Drow: Menzoberranzan, High Forest, Skullport

The Cleric Quintet: Snowflake Mountains, Caradoon, Shilmista (yes, technically part of Erlkazar, but doesn't delve in)

Avatar Series: From Arabel to Shadowdale, from Shadowdale to Tantras, Tantras to Waterdeep, Fugue Plane and other godly domains, (Crucible ?)

Elminster: Making of a Mage: Ancient Athalantar, south of High Forest

Counselors and Kings Trilogy: Halruua, (Floodgate?), (Wizardwar?)

Moonshae Trilogy: Moonshae Isles
Druidhome Trilogy: ?

Silverfall (disgusted by the book, by the way. Don't like Greenwood's work): Waterdeep, Aglarond/Thay, Sembia

Children of Bhaal Saga (It's canon by me): Baldur's Gate to Nashkel, Athkatla and immediate area, the Wealdath and Saradush.

City of Raven's Bluff: Raven's Bluff (duh)

These are the books I know of/have read, so please add any others to the list.
25   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Artemas Entreri Posted - 26 Aug 2011 : 14:36:54
lol
Wooly Rupert Posted - 26 Aug 2011 : 14:27:12
quote:
Originally posted by entreri3478

OP- im not sure why you would want to avoid writing a story that takes place in an area of the Realms that has been used in another book. I love when books take place somewhere i have already traveled to before. That's the great thing about the Realms: there is so much information available about them, that they actually feel like a real place when you travel through with whatever novel you are reading. On the flip side, i also love when a book takes place somewhere i have never been = NEW ADVENTURE :-)



I found that argument rather ironic when they immediately did a bunch of books in Waterdeep.
Artemas Entreri Posted - 26 Aug 2011 : 14:05:47
OP- im not sure why you would want to avoid writing a story that takes place in an area of the Realms that has been used in another book. I love when books take place somewhere i have already traveled to before. That's the great thing about the Realms: there is so much information available about them, that they actually feel like a real place when you travel through with whatever novel you are reading. On the flip side, i also love when a book takes place somewhere i have never been = NEW ADVENTURE :-)
Dennis Posted - 26 May 2011 : 05:06:48

With all the side-chatters, I almost didn't get the purpose of this thread...Well, until I read the OP.

The Watercourse trilogy - Innarlith

The Brotherhood of the Griffon trilogy - Chessenta

Shield of Weeping Ghosts - Rashemen

The Haunted Lands trilogy - Thay, Aglarond
swifty Posted - 29 Aug 2010 : 10:55:34
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Faraer

'Youse' is a US and Australian regionalism for 'you'.

The Noblet tarot deck is the jeu de tarot de Jean Noblet.



More specifically, in the US, "youse" (or "youse guys") is common in the New England area -- Boston, New York City, around there. Down here in Florida and the South (culturally, central Florida is not part of the South), the word is "y'all".

youse is also often used in my home city of liverpool.we have a strong irish influence in our accent as does boston.might be just coincedence but maybe not.
The Sage Posted - 11 May 2008 : 03:58:50
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Smyther


(Edit: and what on Ed's Green Toril is the Spellplague?!)



A bad, bad dream that we hope to wake from soon.

And to expand a little on Wooly's reply, Smyther, you may find these two scrolls informative:-

Spellplague: The Wailing Years: http://forum.candlekeep.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10705

And, 4e FR: http://forum.candlekeep.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=9912
Wooly Rupert Posted - 11 May 2008 : 03:18:18
quote:
Originally posted by Smyther


(Edit: and what on Ed's Green Toril is the Spellplague?!)



A bad, bad dream that we hope to wake from soon.
Smyther Posted - 11 May 2008 : 02:01:13
Wow... after all these years this thread is still going...

I'm not dead, just taken up with university and such academic pursuits. Unfortunately that's also led to a decrease in time spent reading FR novels. May have to look into several threads recommending recent books, since I'm completely out of the loop - I only heard about this crazy thing called '4th Edition' lately, and that led me to think back and look at my old interests.

So, Xysma, how's the project coming along in my stead? I'd pick it up again, but like I say I've been gone for too long.

Now, to get back to actually writing my own novel... a pity dreams of a FR novel died, but creating my own world is just as fun =P

(Edit: and what on Ed's Green Toril is the Spellplague?!)
Fillow Posted - 02 Feb 2008 : 16:40:15
quote:
Originally posted by Rosemary Jones

Mais oui! But I read him in English translation. Phileas Fogg is one of my favorite characters. My oldest copy of this book is an 1884 edition titled "Tour of the World in 80 Days." Thomsen's book attracted my attention because it was inspired by Verne.
I may ben chauvinist but J. VERNE is the most visionary author I ever read about. Just have a look at "From the Earth to the Moon" (1865) and then to the twentieth century space conquest. With round to 100 years of advance, VERNE really had a good idea about this adventure !
And that's the same about Paris in the 20th Century (written in 1863 and published in 1994 !). It's all the same.
Moreover, he rests in my birthtown !
On eof my preferred authors with Emile ZOLA, but it's another story and I'm totally out of topic. Excuse-me Alaundo.

quote:
Originally posted by Rosemary Jones

And I would be interested in hearing what people think is a "good" novel that covers the most FR geography or describes the FR geography in the best way.
IMO, to describe canon lore and to stay close to the conceptors' spirit is enough to be a good novel about FR geography.
That's not such an interesting opinion but It was most of all to come back to the topic. Though I really think these would be a good novel !
Rosemary Jones Posted - 02 Feb 2008 : 03:07:36
quote:
Originally posted by Fillow

EDIT : was does Verne mean ? Jules Verne ? our great French writer ? I do not think so...




Mais oui! But I read him in English translation. Phileas Fogg is one of my favorite characters. My oldest copy of this book is an 1884 edition titled "Tour of the World in 80 Days." Thomsen's book attracted my attention because it was inspired by Verne. Another Verne connection are my bits of Nellie Bly memorabilia. Nellie was the American journalist who recreated Fogg's journey in real life (as much as she could).

Sorry, totally off-topic for the Realms and for this thread, but sometimes I'm attracted to a book by what I can only call a "collection connection." Trust me, if they ever do an Oz-Forgotten Realms crossover, I'll be the first one to order it. Same thing with Barsoom. You send John Carter of Mars to the Forgotten Realms, and I'll have to buy it.

And I would be interested in hearing what people think is a "good" novel that covers the most FR geography or describes the FR geography in the best way.

Rosemary Jones Posted - 02 Feb 2008 : 02:34:21
quote:
Originally posted by Faraer
I was clarifying Rosemary Jones's recommendation of the book 'for anyone really taken with the idea of geography and the Realms'. Yes, it follows Realms geography, but uses it for would-be comic effect, and it's not a place to find serious Realmslore. I doubt Brian Thomsen intended it to be 'canonical'.






And it does make me laugh. I have a bit of a soft spot for Volo and some of those earlier TSR novels set in the Realms.



Fillow Posted - 14 Jan 2008 : 20:41:26
quote:
Originally posted by Faraer

'Youse' is a US and Australian regionalism for 'you'.

The Noblet tarot deck is the jeu de tarot de Jean Noblet.


Thanks (again !) for this French lesson.
Twice a day I see French expressions in the same topic and that I don't understand them ! (Jules Verne was the first one).
I'm so immersed in your language that it looks like I do not read French anymore when I'm among you.

Rinonalyrna Fathomlin Posted - 14 Jan 2008 : 16:39:10
"Youse" sounds like something the stereotypical Italian-American might say--and you heard that from someone who has Italian blood in her.
Wooly Rupert Posted - 14 Jan 2008 : 01:40:10
quote:
Originally posted by Faraer

'Youse' is a US and Australian regionalism for 'you'.

The Noblet tarot deck is the jeu de tarot de Jean Noblet.



More specifically, in the US, "youse" (or "youse guys") is common in the New England area -- Boston, New York City, around there. Down here in Florida and the South (culturally, central Florida is not part of the South), the word is "y'all".
Rinonalyrna Fathomlin Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 21:57:27
Fillow: You're welcome.

quote:
Originally posted by Faraer
Les Visiteurs du Soir is coming out on DVD!


Out of sheer curiosity I looked that movie up. The plot sounds very intriguing.
Faraer Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 21:22:45
'Youse' is a US and Australian regionalism for 'you'.

The Noblet tarot deck is the jeu de tarot de Jean Noblet.
Fillow Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 15:47:02
quote:
Originally posted by Faraer

One of youse guys restored/recreated the awesome Noblet tarot deck I bought recently.
Hmmm... Excuse-me but I did not understand bold words.

Thanks to you Faraer & Wooly for having answered me.
Faraer Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 13:49:49
quote:
Originally posted by Fillow
I thank you for answering, Rinonalyrna. sometimes, I'm really proud to be a Frenchie.
One of youse guys restored/recreated the awesome Noblet tarot deck I bought recently. Les Visiteurs du Soir is coming out on DVD!
quote:
Once around the Realms [/i]doesn't follow The Realms geography ? It's not an official or canon novel ?

I was clarifying Rosemary Jones's recommendation of the book 'for anyone really taken with the idea of geography and the Realms'. Yes, it follows Realms geography, but uses it for would-be comic effect, and it's not a place to find serious Realmslore. I doubt Brian Thomsen intended it to be 'canonical'.
Wooly Rupert Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 13:31:17
quote:
Originally posted by Fillow

Once around the Realms doesn't follow The Realms geography ? It's not an official or canon novel ?



It's listed as "Volo Novel; unknown if factual or apocryphal; needs Elminster notes!" That's from the very old and outdated Presenting... Seven Millennia of Realms Fiction page, which at the time listed all the fiction and when it happened.
Fillow Posted - 13 Jan 2008 : 09:55:02
quote:
Originally posted by Rinonalyrna Fathomlin

It's a reference to the author Jules Verne.

I thank you for answering, Rinonalyrna. sometimes, I'm really proud to be a Frenchie.

quote:
Originally posted by Faraer

It doesn't use Realms geography except ... I wonder if it would have been published if it wasn't the idea of the head of the books department.
Once around the Realms doesn't follow The Realms geography ? It's not an official or canon novel ?
Faraer Posted - 12 Jan 2008 : 23:28:15
Yes, it's based on Around the World in Eighty Days. It doesn't use Realms geography except as material for a series of gags. I wonder if it would have been published if it wasn't the idea of the head of the books department.
Rinonalyrna Fathomlin Posted - 12 Jan 2008 : 22:22:14
It's a reference to the author Jules Verne.

And indeed, Once Around the Realms ain't too popular around here, but that doesn't mean it can't appeal to anybody.
Fillow Posted - 12 Jan 2008 : 10:14:55
quote:
Originally posted by Rosemary Jones

... ONCE AROUND THE REALMS by Brian Thomsen. A very fun FR take on one of my favoriter Verne novels.

Really ?
I read a review about this novel on the Candlekeep website and it was not good at all !
It was here : http://www.candlekeep.com/bookshelf/novels/8550.htm

EDIT : was does Verne mean ? Jules Verne ? our great French writer ? I do not think so...
Rosemary Jones Posted - 12 Jan 2008 : 04:30:45
And for anyone really taken with the idea of geography and the Realms, I'm reading ONCE AROUND THE REALMS by Brian Thomsen. A very fun FR take on one of my favoriter Verne novels.
Rosemary Jones Posted - 12 Jan 2008 : 04:25:06
quote:
Originally posted by Xysma

quote:
Originally posted by Rosemary Jones
Pages 214 and 215 of FRCS are well-thumbed in my copy.


I could tell you did your homework, I'm really enjoying this book so far.



I highly recommend sticky notes. I had several colors which all had different meanings. And my editor at WOTC was very kind about panic e-mails like "I need a camel. Where would camels come from?"

Once I was done with CRYPT, I really wanted to do a book about Procampur. I rather fell in love with ideas of those districts defined by roof tiles.

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